Fendalton war memorial church

Fendalton war memorial church Fendalton war memorial church Fendalton war memorial church Fendalton war memorial church Fendalton war memorial church Fendalton war memorial church Fendalton war memorial church

Anglican Archbishop Julius Churchill laid the foundation stone of the new St Barnabas’ Church in Fendalton on 22 March 1925. The handsome stone edifice, designed by architect Cecil Wood, was consecrated by Bishop Campbell West-Watson on 26 November 1926.

The church was dedicated to the glory of God and in memory of those who gave their lives in the Great War. The First World War roll of honour, an oak tablet carved by sculptor Frederick Gurnsey, listed the names of 32 men from the parish who had given their lives. Parishioners also installed a brass plaque in memory of Lieutenant William John Marriott, a former Fendalton scoutmaster, killed in action in France on 20 September 1916. The west window (not pictured here) was donated by Kate Gerard as a memorial to all Fendalton men who served in the war.

After the Second World War a second memorial tablet similar in design to the first was installed in the church. This listed another 27 names.

The church was severely damaged in the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake but was reopened on 19 February 

Sources: ‘St Barnabas’ Church’, Press, 7/6/1924, p. 10; ‘New Fendalton Church: Laying of Foundation Stone’, Press, 21/3/1925; ‘Memorial Window: Art in Stained Glass’, Press, 19/7/1926, p. 8; ‘A Noble Edifice: Consecration by the Bishop’, Press, 22/11/1926, p. 11; Heritage New Zealand, St Barnabas Church (Anglican), 1985; Frieda Looser, Fendall’s Legacy: A History of Fendalton and North-West Christchurch, Christchurch, 2002, pp. 138-41; Kete Christchurch, St Barnabas Anglican Church, Fendalton, 2015.

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