First World War laws and regulations

This annotated idex of wartime laws and regulations 1914-21 was compiled by Tim Shoebridge and published in 2014.

The New Zealand government passed the War Regulations Act 1914 on 2 November 1914, an umbrella Act for the web of rules and regulations concerning wartime matters (recruitment, enemy aliens, censorship, industrial conditions etc). These rules were constantly refined and updated during the war, and were mostly revoked between the armistice and October 1920. I’ve tabulated the regulations by combing the indexes of the New Zealand Gazette, where they had to be published to pass into law. The changing scope of what could fall under the War Regulations Act is documented in the ‘War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments’ section of this document.

Regulations issued under the War Regulations Act (and its amendments) were printed as separate publications at several points during the war, with the fifth and final edition updated to 23 June 1919. I’ve annotated this list with the corresponding pages in the 1919 edition, which includes only those regulations still in force in June 1919. These references are printed as [WRA 1919 pp]. There’s also a really useful index at the end of this publication which you can download as a pdf here (13 mbs).

Many wartime rules and regulations were passed under other Acts (such as the Military Service Act). I have indexed these into this page to provide as full a picture as possible of the laws and regulations in power during the war. You can also download this index of wartime laws and regulations as a pdf document (1.3mbs). Please email any corrections or additions to info@nzhistory.net.nz

Detailed table of contents

Law and order

Censorship

Soldiers in New Zealand – rules and benefits

Recruiting and military organisation

Specific military units and boards

Industrial conditions in New Zealand

War funds and finance

Miscellaneous

War-related gazette notices not indexed

Law and order

War Regulations Act 1914 and amendments

1914 – 2 November
War Regulations Act 1914 [WRA 1919 pp.5-6]

  • the Governor in Council can make regulations to better secure the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, and the effective conduct of naval and military operations (s2-3)
  • any person who commits an offence against the regulations shall be liable on summary conviction before a magistrate to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months when the accused is an alien, or 3 in any other case, or to a fine not exceeding £100 (s4) (the clause relating to enemy aliens deleted by War Regulations Amendment Act No. 2 1915)
  • these regulations won’t be invalid where they conflict with any other Act (s5)
  • Magistrate shall take the fact of being at war into consideration; the burden of proving the accused is not an enemy alien falls on the accused; prosecution shall be by summary proceedings and not indictment; accused shall stay in prison while their conviction is appealed (s6)
  • Act shall stay in force until 1 August 1915 (s8) (extended to end of the war by the War Regulations Amendment Act 1915); (extended to a year after the end of the war by the War Regulations Amendment Act 1916)
  • s2-3 and 6a-c revoked by the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1914 – 10 November
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 November 1914, pp.4021-4) [WRA 1919 pp.22-6]

  • ‘Whereas by the War Regulations Act 1914, the Governor in Council may for the purpose of better securing the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, and the effective conduct of the military or naval operations of His Majesty during the present war, make regulations as to the power and duties of the members of the Defence Forces, or of the Police Force, or of other persons acting on His Majesty’s behalf: And whereas by the said Act the Governor in Council may also make regulations prohibiting any acts which, in his opinion, are injurious to the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, or of the effective conduct of the military or naval operations of His Majesty during the present war’
  • any authorised person may arrest without warrant any person reasonably suspected of acting in breach of these regulations
  • any alien enemy so arrested shall be detained by the military authorities at the discretion of the Minister of Defence
  • military authorities authorised to search any premises or ship thought to be used for such activities
  • any boat passing through a defended harbour and reasonably suspected of breaching these regulations can be fired upon
  • military authorities can post an armed guard at any building or ship for the purpose of securing public safety; anyone who approaches and disregards a warning can be fired upon; all members of Defence Forces stationed at any fort, battery, ship, or camp shall be deemed to be an armed guard
  • Attorney-General can charge any enemy alien with interfering with military or naval operations; that person can be court-martialled and be liable to execution
  • no person can assist a prisoner of war to escape or harbour them
  • no person can obstruct a person carrying out the orders of a military authority, or withhold information required by them, or trespass on land used for military purposes, or any place used for telegraphic purposes (whether in possession of the Crown or not)
  • no person can publish or spread false reports likely to create disaffection or alarm
  • no person shall have telegraph equipment without authorisation
  • no vessel can leave a defended harbour without permission from the military authority
  • no person can publish or communicate the movements of HM’s vessels, or about fortification or defence of any place, such as might be useful to the enemy
  • no-one can communicate with a prisoner of war except through the post office
  • no-one can show lights at night which might be construed as signalling to the enemy
  • no-one shall interfere with telegraph equipment
  • no-one shall act as intermediary with alien enemies through the post office

 

1915 – 3 July
War Regulations Amendment Act 1915 [WRA 1919 p.7]

  • in prosecutions under this Act, the Court may admit any evidence it sees fit whether such evidence is legally admissible in other proceedings or not (s3)
  • the ‘acts … injurious to the public safety’ can be of omission as well as commission (s4) (revoked by the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)
  • extends the duration of the Act till the end of the present war with Germany (s5)
  • revoked by the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1915 – 11 October
War Regulations Amendment (No. 2) 1915 [WRA 1919 pp.8-10]

  • the Minister of Defence may requisition any military supplies from the owner or occupier of any factory or workshop which may be adapted to the manufacture of military supplies (s3)
  • they’ll then be legally obliged to deliver (s4); price to be determined by arbitration (s5); penalty for failure to deliver (s6); Minister may take possession of factory in event of refusal (s7) and the owner penalised for refusal (s8)
  • amended 10 December 1918 to cover the period after the war (s29 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918) [WRA 1919 p.21]
  • s2, 4, 7 and parts of s3 revoked by the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 7 August
War Regulations Amendment Act 1916 [WRA 1919 pp.11-15]

  • scope of war regulations extended to cover: the suppression, restriction, or control of enemy trade; enemy property; allowing the Public Trustee to work on behalf of attorneys out of the country; allowing soldiers to allocate the power of attorney; empowering minors in the NZEF to grant the power of attorney; the regulation of sale of liquor to soldiers, the treatment of venereal disease, and the prevention of prostitution; the maintenance of essential industries (s3)
  • regulations may regulate the procedure of the Supreme Court in its treatment of enemy trade (s4)
  • Licensing Committees may overturn publicans’ licenses if they’re found to be serving soldiers (s4)
  • extends the duration of the Act to one year following the conclusion of the war with Germany  (s7)

1916 – 7 August
War Legislation Amendment Act 1916 [WRA 1919 p.16]

  • makes provision for the cancellation of contracts for military supplies in cases of wilful breach of contract by contractor (s41)
  • s41 repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1917 – 31 October
War Legislation Act 1917 [WRA 1919 pp.17-18]

  • existing regulations remain in force, and the power to make regulations extended to: prohibiting the use of labour or capital in inessential industry, prohibiting or restriction the registration of businesses, prohibiting the establishment of foreign companies in NZ, regulating the delivery of goods in cities and boroughs to effect labour savings, to regulate the labour of enemy aliens, to require people employed in inessential industries to prove why they should be, for the management of any industry or business in the public welfare, and to authorise the employment of women and girls in any industry in lieu of men (s34-35)

1918 – 15 April
Finance Act 1918 [WRA 1919 p.19]

  • Governor-General may pass regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 concerning: the procuring, exacting, enforcing, controlling and regulating national service in the present war – national service means all service, employment, occupation, business, work or industry essential to the public welfare (but not including military service); prohibiting or restricting any service, employment, occupation, business, work or industry; regulation of the remuneration of national service (subject to the IC&A Act 1908)

1920 – 5 March
Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on 10th January 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

  • ‘The War Regulations Act and amendments remain in operation for one year after the war or for such shorter period as the Governor-General may by Proclamation determine. (See 1916, No. 9, section 7). All War Regulations remain in force for the same period unless revoked sooner.’

1920 – 6 October
War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

  • all War Regulations other than those mentioned in the schedules to this Act are hereby revoked (s8)

 

Suppressing seditious activity

See also Enemy aliens and prisoners of war in NZ

Overview

10 November 1914

  • people suspected of breaking War Regulations may be arrested without warrant and detained at the discretion of the Minister of Defence
  • authorities may search any premises or ships suspected of being used for seditious activities
  • alien enemies arrested for seditious activities may be detained at the pleasure of the Minister of Defence
  • any boat suspected of breaching regulations may be fired upon
  • any building or ship may be guarded by armed guard in public interest, and anyone who disregards warnings from guards may be fired upon
  • Attorney-General may charge any enemy alien with interfering with military and naval operations; that person may be court-martialled and executed
  • no person can assist and POW to escape or harbour them
  • no person can obstruct the carrying out of military orders, or trespass on land used for telegraphic purposes
  • no person can spread false reports likely to create disaffection or alarm
  • no person shall have telegraph equipment without permission, or interfere with telegraph equipment
  • no person can leave a defended harbour without permission of military authorities
  • no person can publish or communicate the movements of HM’s vessels, or about fortifications, such as might be useful to the enemy
  • no-one can communicate with an enemy alien except through the Post Office, or act as an intermediary at the Post Office
  • no-one can show lights at night which might be construed as signalling to the enemy

17 December 1914

  • Postmaster-General can stop the delivery of mail thought injurious to military or naval operations, or accept mail from them or issue money orders to them

20 September 1915

  • military authorities can detain any alien enemy ‘suspected of being disaffected and dangerous’ at their pleasure
  • no person can incite lawlessness or violence, or possess any documents which advocates it
  • no-one can carry a firearm without permission
  • no-one may carry flammable liquids near any railway, harbour, or ship
  • constables may search any person for guns, ammunition, explosives

15 November 1915

  • no person can incite another to break a contract with the Crown relating to the war, discontinue to serve the Crown, of rail to render service to the Crown

24 July 1916

  • Attorney-General may order any person not usually resident in NZ who is ‘disaffected, disloyal, or likely to be a source of danger to the peace, order and good government’ of NZ to leave

4 December 1916

  • no person shall publish any seditious utterance, meaning any statement which excites disaffection against HM or the govts of Britain or NZ, or to incite violence, lawlessness, or disorder
  • no person to encourage any offence prejudicial to public safety, create hostility between the classes, interfere with training or recruiting, interfere with the manufacture or transport of goods required for the war, to prejudice relations with foreign nations or discourage victory in the present war, to encourage resistance to compulsory military service in the war, to interfere with the administration of criminal prosecutions, to refuse service to the Crown or encourage others to refuse, to excite disloyalty
  • Attorney-General may order that disaffected or disloyal people injurious to the public safety may be banned from landing in NZ
  • when Attorney-General orders the arrest of such a person under clause 26 of the war regulations of 24 July 1916, they may be arrested and deported

21 December 1916

  • Police may ban the use of any place about to be or likely to be used for meetings about the war which would be injurious to the public safety
  • any person who allows an unlawful meeting to be held on their premises will be guilty of an offence

5 February 1917

  • disaffected enemy aliens may be arrested and detained at the pleasure of the Minister of Defence – extended to include ‘strangers’ (any person not permanently resident in NZ) on 19 November 1917

16 February 1917

  • no person can incite a seditious strike or seditious lockout intended to effect the conduct of military or naval operations, the manufacture or transport of goods required for the war, the loading or unloading of any vessel carrying troops or necessary goods

20 August 1917

  • no person shall impede any member of the military police in their duties, or incite them to resistance

10 October 1917

  • constables and Customs officials may question people disembarking from ships about their nationality, and detain any person, parcel, or object found around the wharf

5 November 1919

  • people arriving in NZ shall fill out a declaration listing name, occupation, ethnicity, purpose of visit etc (s3, schedule)
  • Germans and Austrians not to land in NZ without a license from the Attorney-General (s4)
  • Attorney-General may prohibit the landing in NZ of undesirable persons (s5)
  • Attorney-General may order disaffected or disloyal persons to leave NZ (s6)
  • Attorney-General may order the arrest and detainment of people proposed to be deported (s7-9)
  • Customs or Police may temporarily block entry (s11)

1914 – 10 November
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 November 1914, pp.4021-4) [WRA 1919 pp.22-6]

  • ‘Whereas by the War Regulations Act 1914, the Governor in Council may for the purpose of better securing the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, and the effective conduct of the military or naval operations of His Majesty during the present war, make regulations as to the power and duties of the members of the Defence Forces, or of the Police Force, or of other persons acting on His Majesty’s behalf: And whereas by the said Act the Governor in Council may also make regulations prohibiting any acts which, in his opinion, are injurious to the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, or of the effective conduct of the military or naval operations of His Majesty during the present war’
  • any authorised person may arrest without warrant any person reasonably suspected of acting in breach of these regulations
  • any alien enemy so arrested shall be detained by the military authorities at the discretion of the Minister of Defence
  • military authorities authorised to search any premises or ship thought to be used for such activities
  • any boat passing through a defended harbour and reasonably suspected of breaching these regulations can be fired upon
  • military authorities can post an armed guard at any building or ship for the purpose of securing public safety; anyone who approaches and disregards a warning can be fired upon; all members of Defence Forces stationed at any fort, battery, ship, or camp shall be deemed to be an armed guard
  • Attorney-General can charge any enemy alien with interfering with military or naval operations; that person can be court-martialled and be liable to execution
  • no person can assist a prisoner of war to escape or harbour them
  • no person can obstruct a person carrying out the orders of a military authority, or withhold information required by them, or trespass on land used for military purposes, or any place used for telegraphic purposes (whether in possession of the Crown or not)
  • no person can publish or spread false reports likely to create disaffection or alarm
  • no person shall have telegraph equipment without authorisation
  • no vessel can leave a defended harbour without permission from the military authority
  • no person can publish or communicate the movements of HM’s vessels, or about fortification or defence of any place, such as might be useful to the enemy
  • no-one can communicate with a prisoner of war except through the post office
  • no-one can show lights at night which might be construed as signalling to the enemy
  • no-one shall interfere with telegraph equipment
  • no-one shall act as intermediary with alien enemies through the post office

 

1915 – 20 September
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 September 1915, pp.3263-4) [WRA 1919 pp.36-9]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • military authorities can arrest and detain any alien ‘suspected […] of being disaffected and dangerous’ at its pleasure
  • no person can incite lawlessness or violence, possess any document which advocates it
  • no person can buy or sell firearms or ammunition without a permit issued under this regulation – amended 29 November 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1915, p.3937), 24 July 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1916, p.2485), 2 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 April 1918, pp.947-8) [WRA 1919 pp.141-2]
  • Minister of Defence can proclaim areas where guns and ammunition can be stored
  • no-one can carry a firearm without permission, or use a gun to injure a member of the Defence Force or Police Force
  • no-one can carry flammable liquids near any railway, harbour, or ship
  • constable may search any person for guns, ammunition, explosives
  • Minister of Defence may declare highways adjoining or intersecting camps to be closed except for military purposes – it will no longer be a highway henceforth but part of the camp
  • continued until specifically revoked from 6 October 1920 by s2 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1915 – 15 November
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 November 1915, pp.3813-4) [WRA 1919 pp.40-3]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no male over the age of 18 years shall leave NZ without a permit issued by Internal Affairs – valid for only one month – doesn’t apply to enemy aliens, non-British subjects, men in the army, or seamen – amended 29 November 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1915, p.3937), 13 December 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 December 1915, p.4031), age reduced to 15 years 21 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2806-7) [WRA 1919 pp.70-2]
  • no person can incite another to break a contract with the Crown relating to the war, to discontinue to serve the Crown, or fail to render service to the Crown
  • no person shall take liquor on board a troop-train
  • amended 10 December 1918 by s26 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918
  • continued under s3 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920
  • revoked, including regulation 1 in s16 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920, 18 September 1922 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 September 1922, p.2625)

1916 – 24 July
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1916, pp.2481-5) [WRA 1919 pp.60-4]

  • Attorney-General may order any person not ordinarily resident in NZ who is ‘disaffected, disloyal, or likely to be a source of danger to the peace, order, and good government’ of NZ, to leave
  • Undesirable Immigrants Exclusion Act 1919 allows regulation 26 to be revoked, 18 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, pp.3789-90)

1916 – 4 December
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1916, pp.3751-3) [WRA 1919 pp.83-6]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no person shall publish any seditious utterance, meaning any statement which excited disaffection against the King or governments of Britain and NZ, or to incite violence, lawlessness, or disorder
  • no person to encourage any offence prejudicial to public safety, create hostility between the classes, interfere with training or recruiting, interfere with the manufacture or transport of goods required for the war, to prejudice relations with foreign nations or discourage victory in the present war, to encourage resistance to compulsory military service in the war, to interfere with the administration of criminal prosecutions, to refuse service to the Crown or encourage others to refuse, to excite disloyalty
  • Attorney-General may order that disaffected or disloyal people injurious to the public safety may be banned from landing in NZ
  • when Attorney-General orders the arrest of such a person under clause 26 of the war regulations of 24 July 1916, they may be arrested and deported
  • Undesirable Immigrants Exclusion Act 1919 allows regulations 8 and 9 to be revoked, 18 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, pp.3789-90)

1916 – 21 December
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, pp.3594-5) [WRA 1919 pp.89-90]

  • Police may ban the use of any place about or likely to be used for meetings about the war which would be injurious to the public safety
  • any person who allows an unlawful meeting to be held on their premises will be guilty of an offence

1917 – 16 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 16 February 1917, pp.699-700) [WRA 1919 pp.97-9]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • industries may be declared essential by Order in Council
  • no person can incite a seditious strike or seditious lockout intended to effect the conduct of military or naval operations, the manufacture or transport of goods required for the war, the loading or unloading of any vessel carrying troops or necessary goods
  • continued by s14 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1917 – 20 August
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 20 August 1917, p.3278) [WRA 1919 p.117]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no person shall impede any member of the military police in their duties, or incite them to resistance

1919 – 5 November
Undesirable Immigrants Exclusion Act 1919

  • people arriving in NZ shall fill out a declaration listing name, occupation, ethnicity, purpose of visit etc (s3, schedule)
  • Germans and Austrians not to land in NZ without a license from the Attorney-General (s4)
  • Attorney-General may prohibit the landing in NZ of undesirable persons (s5)
  • Attorney-General may order disaffected or disloyal persons to leave NZ (s6)
  • Attorney-General may order the arrest and detainment of people proposed to be deported (s7-9)
  • Customs or Police may temporarily block entry (s11)
  • Act to apply within Cook Islands (s14)

Harbours, ships, war risk insurance

1914 – 6 August
Order in Council for granting of days of grace 4 August 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 August 1914, pp.3045-6, 3173-4)

  • Imperial order in council providing that non-military enemy vessels will be given several days to leave allied ports as per a 1907 agreement
  • this order extended to Bulgarian ships (New Zealand Gazette, 20 October 1915, p.3543)

1914 – 30 September
War Risk Insurance Act 1914

  • NZ Govt undertakes to cover the war risks of marine insurance upon cargo in military transport vessels
  • repealed by the third schedule of the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919

1914 – 10 November
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 November 1914, pp.4021-4) [WRA 1919 pp.22-6]

  • ‘Whereas by the War Regulations Act 1914, the Governor in Council may for the purpose of better securing the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, and the effective conduct of the military or naval operations of His Majesty during the present war, make regulations as to the power and duties of the members of the Defence Forces, or of the Police Force, or of other persons acting on His Majesty’s behalf: And whereas by the said Act the Governor in Council may also make regulations prohibiting any acts which, in his opinion, are injurious to the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, or of the effective conduct of the military or naval operations of His Majesty during the present war’
  • any authorised person may arrest without warrant any person reasonably suspected of acting in breach of these regulations
  • any alien enemy so arrested shall be detained by the military authorities at the discretion of the Minister of Defence
  • military authorities authorised to search any premises or ship thought to be used for such activities
  • any boat passing through a defended harbour and reasonably suspected of breaching these regulations can be fired upon
  • military authorities can post an armed guard at any building or ship for the purpose of securing public safety; anyone who approaches and disregards a warning can be fired upon; all members of Defence Forces stationed at any fort, battery, ship, or camp shall be deemed to be an armed guard
  • Attorney-General can charge any enemy alien with interfering with military or naval operations; that person can be court-martialled and be liable to execution
  • no person can assist a prisoner of war to escape or harbour them
  • no person can obstruct a person carrying out the orders of a military authority, or withhold information required by them, or trespass on land used for military purposes, or any place used for telegraphic purposes (whether in possession of the Crown or not)
  • no person can publish or spread false reports likely to create disaffection or alarm
  • no person shall have telegraph equipment without authorisation
  • no vessel can leave a defended harbour without permission from the military authority
  • no person can publish or communicate the movements of HM’s vessels, or about fortification or defence of any place, such as might be useful to the enemy
  • no-one can communicate with a prisoner of war except through the post office
  • no-one can show lights at night which might be construed as signalling to the enemy
  • no-one shall interfere with telegraph equipment
  • no-one shall act as intermediary with alien enemies through the post office

 

1915 – 5 August
Crimes Amendment Act 1915

  • any person who commits an act with the intention of destroying or endangering any ship or cargo, or conspires or incites others to do so, shall be guilty of an indictable offence and liable to the death penalty
  • repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 29 March
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 April 1916, pp.1099-1100)

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Minister of Defence may authorise a badge to be worn by officers or crew of any vessel chartered or controlled by the NZ government in connection with the war

1917 – 17 April
The shipping industry, the carriage of goods, merchandise, or passengers by land or sea, the lading and unlading of ships, and the frozen meat industry declared essential industries (New Zealand Gazette, 17 April 1917, p.1291)

1917 – 11 June
Shipping regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (Shipping Regulations 1917) (New Zealand Gazette, 11 June 1917, pp.2311-3 [WRA 1919 pp.109-10]

  • intended to control the NZ shipping industry to secure public safety and the efficient conduct of that industry and the industries dependent thereon
  • NZ ships can’t be re-registered elsewhere, sold or mortgaged, chartered, withdrawn from trade, leave NZ without permission from the Minister of Marine
  • extended to ships registered in outside ports but used by any company with its headquarters in NZ, 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 November 1919, pp.3563-4)
  • continued by s15 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920
  • revoked 23 February 1922 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 March 1922, p.578)

1917 – 11 June
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 11 June 1917, p.2313) [WRA 1919 p.111]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no blue or white ensign flag can be displayed as to be calculated to deceive

1917 – 16 July
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 16 July 1917, p.2873) [WRA 1919 p.114]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no person to enter a seagoing vessel in harbour, other than people on official business or employed on the ship
  • gangways to be guarded

1917 – 10 October
War Regulations for the safety of ships and cargoes (New Zealand Gazette, 10 October 1917, pp.3845-6) [WRA 1919 pp.117-8]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • from 17 October 1917, no enemy alien or naturalised alien can be engaged in lading or unlading a ship or in any work on the wharves
  • constables and Customs officials may question people about their nationality, and detain any person, parcel, or object found around the wharf
  • people may be banned from the wharves
  • definition of ‘ship’ amended, 4 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 November 1918, p.3691) [WRA 1919 p.183]
  • revoked 3 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 November 1919, p.3371)
  • revived from 6 October 1920 (s3 of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

                   

1917 – 23 November
Additional war regulations for the safety of ships and cargoes (New Zealand Gazette, 23 November 1917, pp.4337-9) [WRA 1919 pp.124-7]

  • to come into operation 30 November 1917
  • no cargo, baggage, or other goods to be placed on board any ship until examined by an examining officer (Customs)
  • any person found deceiving the examining officer shall be guilty of an offence
  • examining officer can open any package or luggage, take custody of suspicious people, enter any building in course of their work

1918 – 24 June
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 24 June 1918, pp.2405-6) [WRA 1919 pp.151-2]

  • every person who trespasses on a guarded wharf is guilty of an offence – armed guard may arrest anyone who does without a warrant
  • it’s an offence to approach within 50 yards of such a wharf in any pleasure boat without permission

1918 – 30 July
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 1 August 1918, pp.2805-6) [WRA 1919 pp.163-5]

  • every ship registered in NZ that has been issued with wireless-telegraph equipment shall be supplied with two certified operators
  • installations to be licensed by the navy
  • amended 14 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 November 1918, p.3818)

1918 – 1 October
War regulations relating to the employment of alien enemies as masters, mates, or engineers of ships or as officials of harbour boards (New Zealand Gazette, 1 October 1918, pp.3415-6) [WRA 1919 p.179]

  • no alien enemies allowed to be involved with domestic shipping
  • continued from 6 October 1920 (s21 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1918 – 29 October
Prohibiting the importation of all goods which are unsafe for carriage by sea because of risk of fire due to their nature or condition, or the manner in which they are packed (New Zealand Gazette, 29 October 1918, p.3655)

  • banned under s46 of the Customs Act 1913 and the Regulation of Trade and Commerce Amendment Act 1915
  • similar notice on the same page banning exports for the same reason

Police, public servants, teachers

1916 – 7 August
War Legislation Amendment Act 1916

  • uncertificated temporary teachers may be appointed during the war period, no such appointment to continue for more than 12 months after the end of the war (s14) – repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920
  • rights asserted of public servants and teachers who have enlisted to retain their superannuation (s17) – superannuation time limit extended 11 November 1920 (s53 of the Finance Act 1920)
  • temporary police officers may be appointed by the Commissioner of Police, not to exceed 12 months after the end of the war (s32)

1917 – 31 October
War Legislation Act 1917

  • Police Force authorised to keep officers on beyond their retirement age during the war, or three months after, or longer as the Governor directs (s28)
  • public servants are not entitled to retire on superannuation during the war without leave (s29)
  • authority terminates with the end of the war (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)
  • s28 repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

Enemy aliens and prisoners of war in New Zealand

See also Trading with the enemy

General

10 November 1914

  • alien enemies suspected of breaking the War Regulations may be arrested without warrant and detained at the discretion of the Minister of Defence
  • alien enemies can be charged with interfering with naval or military operations, and could face execution
  • no-one can communicate with prisoners of war except through the post office, or act as an intermediary for alien enemy mail

9 December 1914

Enemy aliens must report to their nearest police station for registration; they must inform the police when travelling 20 miles from their home

17 December 1914

  • enemy aliens can’t change their names (except by marriage)
  • no-one can communicate with any person or company in an enemy country

19 July 1915

  • any person who has ever been the subject of an enemy country, even if later naturalised British, counts as an enemy alien
  • alien enemies not allowed to leave NZ without permission
  • all powers of arrest conferred under the War Regulations may be used against alien enemies

20 September 1915

Military authorities may detain any alien ‘suspected of being disaffected and dangerous’ at its pleasure – extended to include ‘strangers’ (any person not permanently residing in NZ) on 5 February 1917

11 October 1915

No enemy alien may be employed as a teacher in NZ (repealed November 1927)

22 February 1916

Wills of alien enemies can’t be probated, and their assets distributed, without the permission of the Attorney-General

3 April 1916

  • Attorney-General appoints Public Trustee the Custodian of Enemy Property
  • alien enemies owning property must send details to the Public Trustee by 1 May 1916
  • income from such property to be paid to the Public Trustee (revoked 11 May 1916)

2 May 1916

Wives of enemy aliens to count as enemy aliens even if they were born British citizens

24 July 1916

Attorney-General can appoint the Public Trustee as custodian of the possessions of prisoners of war

15 September 1917

Governor-General may order that any individual’s naturalisation be revoked

28 September 1917

Registration of Aliens Act 1917 – every alien to register with the police within 28 days of the Act being passed (suspended August 1923)

10 October 1917

  • Supreme Court may forfeit any land acquired by an alien enemy since August 1914 to the Crown
  • alien enemies banned from voting in local elections

24 June 1918

A Commissioner appointed to force alien enemies to report for national service

10 December 1918

Any son of an alien enemy who refused military or civil service during the war, or who has been convicted of an offence under the War Regulations, shall be deemed a person of enemy origin, and banned from owning property in NZ (repealed November 1927)

5 August 1919

  • no enemy property may be sent from NZ
  • information about enemy property in NZ to be sent to the Public Trustee, Custodian of Enemy Property

5 November 1919

  • people arriving in NZ must declare their occupation, ethnicity, and purpose of their visit
  • Germans and Austrians not to land without permission from the Attorney-General
  • Attorney-General may order the disaffected or disloyal people to leave NZ, or block their entrance

5 November 1919

British-born women may apply to be divorced from alien enemies now living in other countries

16 October 1922

Disabilities and disqualifications against alien enemies in all Acts revoked

1923

‘Alien friends’ may apply for NZ citizenship under the British Nationality and Status of Aliens (in New Zealand) Act 1923

Enemy companies in NZ

25 November 1914

Attorney-General can place any company owned or partly owned by an alien enemy under the management of the Public Trustee

17 December 1914

No enemy alien can change their name, or the name of their business, after 22 December 1914

28 July 1915

Attorney-General can declare any contract made with an alien enemy to be void until the end of the war

9 August 1915

Attorney-General may prohibit any business currently being carried on by an enemy alien from operating in NZ

3 April 1916

  • Attorney-General appoints Public Trustee the Custodian of Enemy Property
  • alien enemies owning property must send details to the Public Trustee by 1 May 1916
  • income from such property to be paid to the Public Trustee (revoked 11 May 1916)
  • numerous companies declared enemies 1916-19, revoked 2 May 1919

2 May 1916

  • no enemy alien to be involved in foreign trade (to British colonies or elsewhere)
  • Attorney-General may vest any enemy-owned shares in NZ companies in the Custodian of Enemy Property, who may sell them

4 May 1916

  • Attorney-General may appoint the Public Trustee as the Controller of any business declared to be an enemy
  • Controller can take and retain possession of that business, collect moneys owed, sell the firm etc

1914 – 10 November
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 November 1914, pp.4021-4) [WRA 1919 pp.22-6]

  • ‘Whereas by the War Regulations Act 1914, the Governor in Council may for the purpose of better securing the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, and the effective conduct of the military or naval operations of His Majesty during the present war, make regulations as to the power and duties of the members of the Defence Forces, or of the Police Force, or of other persons acting on His Majesty’s behalf: And whereas by the said Act the Governor in Council may also make regulations prohibiting any acts which, in his opinion, are injurious to the public safety, the defence of New Zealand, or of the effective conduct of the military or naval operations of His Majesty during the present war’
  • any authorised person may arrest without warrant any person reasonably suspected of acting in breach of these regulations
  • any alien enemy so arrested shall be detained by the military authorities at the discretion of the Minister of Defence
  • military authorities authorised to search any premises or ship thought to be used for such activities
  • any boat passing through a defended harbour and reasonably suspected of breaching these regulations can be fired upon
  • military authorities can post an armed guard at any building or ship for the purpose of securing public safety; anyone who approaches and disregards a warning can be fired upon; all members of Defence Forces stationed at any fort, battery, ship, or camp shall be deemed to be an armed guard
  • Attorney-General can charge any enemy alien with interfering with military or naval operations; that person can be court-martialled and be liable to execution
  • no person can assist a prisoner of war to escape or harbour them
  • no person can obstruct a person carrying out the orders of a military authority, or withhold information required by them, or trespass on land used for military purposes, or any place used for telegraphic purposes (whether in possession of the Crown or not)
  • no person can publish or spread false reports likely to create disaffection or alarm
  • no person shall have telegraph equipment without authorisation
  • no vessel can leave a defended harbour without permission from the military authority
  • no person can publish or communicate the movements of HM’s vessels, or about fortification or defence of any place, such as might be useful to the enemy
  • no-one can communicate with a prisoner of war except through the post office
  • no-one can show lights at night which might be construed as signalling to the enemy
  • no-one shall interfere with telegraph equipment
  • no-one shall act as intermediary with alien enemies through the post office
  • definition of enemy alien amended 6 October 1920 (Second Schedule of the War Regulation Continuance Act 1920)

 

1914 – 25 November
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 November 1914, pp.4141-2)

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Attorney-General can place the Public Trustee in charge of any company half-owned by an alien enemy or carrying on a business on enemy territory
  • Public Trustee appointed controller of the Continental C. and G. Rubber Company, 26 November 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 November 1914, p.4215)
  • repealed by regulations of 11 May 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 May 1916, pp.1721-3)

1914 – 9 December
Enemy subjects to report to the Police (New Zealand Gazette, 17 December 1914, p.4340)

  • all un-naturalised citizens of foreign countries residing in NZ must report to the nearest police station for registration, and may not travel more than 20 miles from their home without receiving a permit from the police

1914 – 17 December
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 December 1914, pp.4361-3) [WRA 1919 pp.27-9]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914 and 25 November 1914
  • Postmaster-General can stop the delivery of mail thought injurious to military or naval operations, or accept mail from them or issue money orders to them
  • no enemy alien can change their name, or the name of their business, after 22 December 1914 (other than women getting married)
  • no person shall communicate with any person or company in an enemy country
  • no person shall interfere with the censorship of mail
  • no person shall disobey the military government of territory occupied by NZ, such people could be imprisoned
  • lists of banned correspondents (1915 pp.2050, 2352, 2887, 3037, 3911, 4057), (1916: 454, 503, 582, 805, 989, 1868, 2632, 2966, 3142, 3512), (1917: 965, 1228)
  • bans revoked (1916: p.1795), (1917: 1193, 1410, 2211, 3547, 3548), (1918: 2321), (1919: 1382)

1915 – 19 July
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 July 1915, pp.2473-4) [WRA 1919 pp.33-5]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • all regulations made before and after this notice under the War Regulations Act 1914 shall hereafter be referred to as the War Regulations
  • for the purposes of the War Regulations, any person who has been the subject of an enemy country shall be deemed an alien enemy (even if they’re British born or naturalised) (previous definition of 10 November 1914 repealed)
  • amended definitions of not publishing information about military and naval activities
  • Customs officer can turn away ships carrying enemy goods
  • alien enemies not allowed to leave NZ without permission
  • all powers of arrest conferred under regulations may be exercised against anyone thought to be an enemy alien

1915 – 28 July
Enemy Contracts Act 1915

  • Attorney-General may declare any contract made with an enemy, or in which an enemy is interested, to be an enemy contract
  • once gazetted the contract becomes void, and will remain so after the war’s end
  • repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920
  • NZ Casein Company contracts declared enemy contracts on 19 August 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 August 1915, p.3037)

1915 – 9 August
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 August 1915, pp.2871-2) [WRA 1919 pp.35-6]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Attorney-General may prohibit any business currently carried on by an enemy alien from operating in NZ

1915 – 18 August
Form published for the execution of legal documents of prisoners of war (New Zealand Gazette, 18 August 1915, pp.3053-4)

1915 – 20 September
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 September 1915, pp.3263-4) [WRA 1919 pp.36-9]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • military authorities can arrest and detain any alien ‘suspected […] of being disaffected and dangerous’ at its pleasure
  • no person can incite lawlessness or violence
  • no person can buy or sell firearms or ammunition without a permit issued under this regulation – amended 29 November 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1915, p.3937), 2 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 April 1918, pp.947-8)
  • Minister of Defence can proclaim areas where guns and ammunition can be stored
  • no-one can carry a firearm without permission, or use a gun to injure a member of the Defence Force or Police Force
  • no-one can carry flammable liquids near any railway, harbour, or ship
  • constable may search any person for guns, ammunition, explosives
  • Minister of Defence may declare highways adjoining or intersecting camps to be closed except for military purposes – it will no longer be a highway henceforth but part of the camp

1915 – 11 October
Alien Enemy Teachers Act 1915

  • no alien enemy permitted to be employed as a teacher in NZ
  • governing body of school may compensate the teacher for loss of office
  • to continue for the duration of the war (this clause repealed by the third schedule of the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919)
  • repealed 11 November 1927 by the War Disabilities Removal Act 1927

1916 – 22 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 23 February 1916, pp.542-3) [WRA 1919 pp.44-5]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no-one can probate the will of an enemy alien, or distribute the assets of such as estate, without the permission of the Attorney-General
  • definition of enemy alien of regulations of 19 July 1915 is amended to include Bulgarians
  • no person may publish lists of the contents of ships bound for the UK or any place north of the equator
  • amends the War Regulations of 22 February 1915 prohibiting the publication of information to cover ‘confidential communications’
  • no-one can publish any matter or statement in such a way that it shows parts have been omitted by a censor
  • the military authorities may ban the publication of any matter relative to the war
  • continued by s4 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920
  • amended 22 September 1924 so that no beneficiary of an estate shall be deemed to be an enemy alien if the deceased person died before the Treaty of Peace (as per s4 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920) (New Zealand Gazette, 2 October 1924, p.2251)
  • amended 24 November 1924 so that the provisions of clause 2 shall not apply to alien enemies who died after the Treaty of Peace (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1924, p.2830)

1916 – 3 April
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 April 1916, pp.953-7) [WRA 1919 pp.47-53]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • the Public Trustee appointed the custodian of enemy property, and people who owned such property had to send details of the property to the PT by 1 May 1916 – all income to be paid to the PT (repealed by regulations of 11 May 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 May 1916, pp.1721-3)
  • no person shall trade with the enemy except under certain circumstances
  • companies declared enemies 20 April 1916, along with license to wind up 3 businesses (New Zealand Gazette, 20 April 1916, p.1103-4); 16 January 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 January 1917, p.206); 1917: 264, 445, 989, 1138, 1239, 1445, 1971, 2045, 2211, 2431, 3009, 3323, 3363, 3909, 4477, 4581; 1918: 203, 755, 981, 1275, 2057, 2473, 3109, 3257, 3503, 3829; 1919: 25, 695, 963
  • technically amended 24 July 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1916, pp.2481-5), 18 December 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, pp.3853-4) [WRA 1919 pp.87-8], 20 August 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 August 1917, pp.3277-8) [WRA 1919 p.116], 10 September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 September 1917, p.3535 [WRA 1919 p.119]), policy for company licenses updated 30 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 30 April 1918, p.1274), 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 November 1919, p.3561)
  • all notices declaring companies, firms, and persons to be enemies revoked 2 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 May 1919, p.1281)
  • continued by s5 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920
  • regulations revoked 16 March 1925 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 March 1925, p.837)

1916 – 2 May
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 May 1916, pp.1595-8) [WRA 1919 pp.53-7]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no enemy alien to be involved in foreign trade (whether it be to British colonies or elsewhere)
  • Attorney-General may vest any shares in a NZ company held by an enemy alien in the Custodian of Enemy Property, who can sell the shares
  • Attorney-General may declare any company substantially controlled by an enemy alien to be an enemy company under the regulations of 3 April 1916
  • NZ companies to report if they have foreign correspondents based in enemy countries
  • wives of alien enemies to count as alien enemies under this and all other war regulations (cf 24 July 1916)
  • technically amended 28 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 1916, p.2876) [WRA 1919 pp.73-4]
  • Eberhard Focke, carrying on business in Wellington as Castendyk and Focke, classified as an enemy alien and prohibited from engaging in foreign trade, 5 July 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 July 1916, p.2314)
  • the declaration of Jerusalem & Co, jewellers, Wellington, as an enemy company revoked on 15 July 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 July 1916, pp.2424-5)
  • shares in the Drapery and General Importing Co of NZ (Ltd) and Hallenstein Bros Ltd vested in the Custodian of Enemy Property on 13 September 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 September 1916, pp.2991-2)
  • clause relating to detention of enemy goods repealed by regulations of 13 October 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 October 1916, pp.3283-6) [WRA 1919 pp.79-82]
  • clause one shall not apply to naturalised aliens, who they can be licensed to participate in foreign trade (New Zealand Gazette, 20 August 1917, pp.3277-8)
  • shares of Otto Levinger, Ernest Ullmann, and Valesca Schultze in the Union Steamship Company vested in the Public Trustee as Custodian of Enemy Property on 10 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 February 1919, p.383)
  • continued by s6 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 4 May
Notice under the War Regulations declaring certain persons, firms, and companies to be enemies (New Zealand Gazette, 4 May 1916, pp.1599-1605)

  • further such notices: 1916 p.1665, 1819, 1918, 2269, 2314, 2335, 2632, 2681, 2939, 3037, 3176, 3201, 3341, 3553

1916 – 11 May
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 May 1916, pp.1721-3) [WRA 1919 pp.58-60]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Attorney-General may appoint the Public Trustee the Controller of any business declared to be an enemy
  • Controller can take and retain possession of that business, collect moneys owed, sell the firm or carry it on etc
  • regulations of 25 November 1914 and clause 29 of the regulations of 3 April 1916 repealed
  • continued by s7 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920
  • the following companies placed under the Public Trustee as per these regulations on 15 May 1916: Markwald Son and Ross, G. Hardt & Co, Eugene Schroeder, Rhodius & Co (Ltd), the Continental C. & G. Rubber Co.

1916 – 24 July
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1916, pp.2481-5) [WRA 1919 pp.60-4]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • importation of goods from non-enemy countries to be licensed by the Comptroller of Customs
  • enemy trade provisions amended
  • Public Trustee can be appointed trustee for the possessions of prisoners of war
  • the wife of an enemy alien shall be deemed to be an enemy alien, an the wife of an enemy alien who isn’t naturalised will likewise be considered not-naturalised (cf 2 May 1916)
  • no man over 18 years can leave NZ as crew of a vessel unless they have been discharged from the armed forces or have a permit to leave New Zealand; reduced to 15 years 21 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2806-7) [WRA 1919 pp.70-2]
  • Attorney-General may order any person not ordinarily resident in NZ who is ‘disaffected, disloyal, or likely to be a source of danger to the peace, order, and good government’ of NZ, to leave
  • technically amended 28 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 1916, p.2876) [WRA 1919 pp.73-4], 11 September 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 September 1916, p.2989) [WRA 1919 p.75], 13 October 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 October 1916, pp.3283-6) [WRA 1919 pp.79-82], 20 November 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 November 1916, p.3615) [WRA 1919 p.83]
  • appointment of Public Trustee as Custodian of prisoner of war property shall continue until revoked by the Attorney General, even if the person has ceased to be a prisoner of war or be resident in NZ, 12 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 May 1919, p.1475) [WRA 1919 pp.202-3]; amended by s9 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920 to extend definition of ‘prisoner of war’ to those enemy aliens for whom an arrest has been authorised by not yet carried out
  • definition of ‘prisoner of war’ revised; all appointments of the Public Trustee as custodian of enemy property remain in force, who shall have full discretion to make payments to the prisoner of war or his wife and family, 15 September 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 September 1919, pp.2873-4)
  • Undesirable Immigrants Exclusion Act 1919 allows regulation 26 to be revoked, 18 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, pp.3789-90)
  • continued by s8 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 18 December
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, pp.3953-4) [WRA 1919 pp.87-8]

  • war regulations of 3 April 1916 provided that no owner of a British ship in NZ could transfer interests to non-British person – further clarification
  • continued by s11 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 21 December
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, pp.3594-5) [WRA 1919 pp.89-90]

  • Attorney-General may declare enemy property (as defined by s3 of the War Regulations Amendment Act 1916) may be vested in the Public Trustee as the Custodian of Enemy Property
  • Public Trustee can sell it and hold the proceeds in trust for those entitled to it
  • Police may ban the use of any place about or likely to be used for meetings about the war which would be injurious to the public safety
  • any person who allows an unlawful meeting to be held on their premises will be guilty of an offence
  • real estate owned by William Hammerich, formerly of Greytown, hotel-keeper, now believed to be resident in Germany, vested in the Custodian of Enemy Property on 5 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 March 1917, p.873)
  • property belonging to A. Hartrodt and Co of Hamburg, now in the custody of the NZ Express Co Ltd (a case containing paper-knives), vested in the Public Trustee as Custodian of Enemy Property on 30 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1917, p.1193)
  • continued by s12 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1917 – 5 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 5 February 1917, pp.439-40) [WRA 1919 p.92]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • it’s an offence to publish or distribute information about the movements of ships from New Zealand which might be profitably destroyed by the enemy (cf 9 January 1917)
  • an authorised officer (under the Military Service Act) can arrest and deliver into custody an NZEF soldier suspected of committing an offence under these regulations
  • disaffected enemy aliens may be arrested and detained at the pleasure of the Minister of Defence – extended to include ‘strangers’ (any person not permanently resident in NZ) on 19 November 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 November 1917, p.4276) [WRA 1919 p.124]
  • amended 2 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1917, pp.1209-10) [WRA 1919 p.102]

1917 – 15 September
Revocation of Naturalisation Act 1917

  • Governor-General can order that an individual’s naturalisation be revoked by Order in Council
  • amended 9 August 1920 concerning the surrender of letters of naturalisation on revocation (Revocation of Naturalisation Amendment Act 1920)
  • 1917 and 1920 Acts repealed 1923 by the British Nationality and Status of Aliens (in New Zealand) Act 1923

1917 – 28 September
Registration of Aliens Act 1917

  • every alien to register with the police within 28 days of the Act being passed
  • certificates of registration to be issued, and a register of aliens to be compiled by the Government Statistician
  • Act suspended 20 August 1923 by the Registration of Aliens Suspension Act 1923, subject to reactivation by a Proclamation of the Executive Council

1917 – 10 October
War Regulations for the safety of ships and cargoes (New Zealand Gazette, 10 October 1917, pp.3845-6)

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • from 17 October 1917, no enemy alien or naturalised alien can be engaged in lading or unlading a ship or in any work on the wharves
  • constables and Customs officials may question people about their nationality, and detain any person, parcel, or object found around the wharf
  • people may be banned from the wharves
  • definition of ‘ship’ amended, 4 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 November 1918, p.3691)
  • revoked 3 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 November 1919, p.3371)
  • continued by s17 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

                   

1917 – 31 October
War Legislation Act

  • Supreme Court permitted to forfeit any land acquired by an enemy alien since the start of the war into the hands of His Majesty (Part I) – repealed 11 November 1927 by the War Disabilities Removal Act 1927
  • enemy aliens banned from voting in local elections (Part II)
  • as of March 1920, the loss of electoral rights were permanent and not affected by the end of the war (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

1917 – 5 November
Regulations under the Registration of Aliens Act 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 November 1917, pp.4138-40)

  • every alien to register using the forms included in the regulations
  • forms to be kept by Government Statistician
  • aliens leaving NZ to deliver their certificate of registration to the Govt Statistician
  • consuls, staff of visiting commissions, and crews of ships exempt from registration
  • additional registration officers appointed 6 November 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 November 1917, pp.4195-6)

1918 – 27 February
Compulsory notification of claims by British subjects against the enemy (New Zealand Gazette, 28 February 1918, pp.663-4) [WRA 1919 pp.139-40]

  • intended to identify property in enemy territory belonging to British subjects – such information already sought in Britain, now being extended to NZ
  • all NZ individuals and companies to make declaration to the Public Trustee about such property by 30 April 1918
  • continued by s18 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1918 – 24 June
Additional war regulations providing for the compulsory national service by alien enemies and other persons of alien enemy descent (New Zealand Gazette, 24 June 1918, pp.2406-8) [WRA 1919 pp.152-4]

  • Minister of Defence may appoint a Commissioner to enforce these regulations
  • Commissioner may require any alien enemy or reservist to report for national service
  • John Cullen appointed to the position

1918 – 1 October
War regulations relating to the employment of alien enemies as masters, mates, or engineers of ships or as officials of harbour boards (New Zealand Gazette, 1 October 1918, pp.3415-6) [WRA 1919 p.179]

  • no alien enemies allowed to be involved with domestic shipping
  • continued from 6 October 1920 (s21 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1918 – 10 December
War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918

  • every son of an alien enemy, who has refused military or civil service during the war, or has been convicted of an offence under the War Regulations, shall be deemed to be a person of enemy origin (s4)
  • they’re banned from owning property in NZ except by license from the Governor-General (s5-6)
  • any land acquired since 4 August 1914 may be taken for public purposes by the Supreme Court, and the owners may be entitled to compensation (s7-10)
  • s10 of the War Legislation Act 1917 limits the prohibition of certain contracts until the termination of the war; this Act will continue those terms (s11)
  • s2-12 of Act repealed 11 November 1927 by the War Disabilities Removal Act 1927
  • no person can act as Consular Agent for any foreign state without the authorisation of the Crown (s28)

1919 – 2 May
Revoking all notices by the Attorney-General under the War Regulations declaring certain companies, firms, and persons to be enemies (New Zealand Gazette, 3 May 1919, p.1281)

  • original regulations were clause 20 of the War Regulations of 3 April 1916

1919 – 5 August
War regulations as to enemy property (Enemy Property Regulations, 1919) (New Zealand Gazette, 5 August 1919, pp.2559-61)

  • made under s3 of the War Regulations Amendment Act 1916 and the regulations of 3 April 1916
  • no enemy property can be sent from NZ
  • information about enemy property in NZ to be sent to the Public Trustee, acting as Custodian of Enemy Property
  • a register of property to be kept
  • continued by s23 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920
  • deed of mortgage owed to Hermann Brown, of Germany, vested in the Custodian of Enemy Property, 29 November 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 December 1920, p.3299)

1919 – 5 November
Undesirable Immigrants Exclusion Act 1919

  • people arriving in NZ shall fill out a declaration listing name, occupation, ethnicity, purpose of visit etc (s3, schedule)
  • Germans and Austrians not to land in NZ without a license from the Attorney-General (s4) – repealed 11 November 1927 by the War Disabilities Removal Act 1927
  • Attorney-General may prohibit the landing in NZ of undesirable persons (s5)
  • Attorney-General may order disaffected or disloyal persons to leave NZ (s6) – repealed 11 November 1927 by the War Disabilities Removal Act 1927
  • Attorney-General may order the arrest and detainment of people proposed to be deported (s7-9)
  • Customs or Police may temporarily block entry (s11)
  • Act to apply within Cook Islands (s14)

1919 – 5 November
Divorce and Matrimonial Causes Amendment Act 1919

  • British-born women may apply for a divorce on the grounds that their husband is a ‘person of enemy origin’ (a subject of Germany, Austria, or Bulgaria prior to 28 June 1919) who has been absent from NZ for at least 12 months (s3)
  • the husband’s desire that the wife should leave NZ and join him overseas, or that he was prepared to support her, would not be grounds of refusal for a divorce (s4-6)
  • the woman in all cases to be granted guardianship of children (s8)
  • the Imperial Act ‘Matrimonial Causes (Dominion Troops) Act 1919’ adopted in NZ (s10)
  • repealed 11 November 1927 by the War Disabilities Removal Act 1927

1919 – 14 November
Enemy subjects – permits to travel (New Zealand Gazette, 20 November 1919, p.3548)

  • notice issued 9 December 1914 (Gaz 1914 p.4340) restricting the movements of enemy subjects is now revoked – the operation of the Registration of Aliens Act 1917 will meet all future requirements

1922 – 8 June
Amending War Regulations relating to trading with the enemy (companies) (New Zealand Gazette, 8 June 1922, p.1580)

  • technically amending s5 in the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1922 – 16 October
War Disabilities Removal Act 1922

  • ‘No person who in New Zealand is a British subject, whether by birth or naturalization or otherwise howsoever, shall hereafter be subject to any disabilities or disqualifications imposed by any Act or war regulations or other enactment in respect of enemy aliens or persons of enemy origin, as those terms are defined by any such entitlement.’ (s2)

1923
British Nationality and Status of Aliens (in New Zealand) 1923 (reserved for royal assent)

  • Aliens Act 1908 revoked
  • shall come into operation on a date proclaimed in the Gazette
  • British Nationality and Status of Aliens Act 1914 (Imperial Act, amended 1918, 1922) brought into force in NZ – defines ‘natural born British subject’, outlines the status of married women and children, the loss of British nationality by foreign naturalisation, naturalised subjects can divest themselves of their old nationality; real and personal property of every alien may be treated in the same way as naturalised subjects; they cannot hold property outside the UK, qualify for any local or national office, own a ship, possess any rights or privilege of British citizen except land ownership (s3, First Schedule)
  • ‘alien friends’ may apply for naturalisation in NZ, assuming the Minister of Internal Affairs is satisfied of their good character etc – they would then have the same status as a British born subject (s4-6)
  • technical provisions concerning certificates of naturalisation (s7-12)
  • naturalised aliens may own land in NZ (s13)
  • Act applied to Cook Islands and Western Samoa (s14)
  • amended 6 November 1924 allowing natives of Western Samoa to be naturalised despite not speaking English (British Nationality and Status of Aliens (in New Zealand) Amendment Act 1924)

 

Censorship

Censoring newspapers, mail, telegrams etc

See also Enemy aliens, Suppressing seditious activity

3 August 1914

  • Governor may close telegraph stations in times of war
  • Governor appoints censors of telegraphic messages at various ports, who could view any message before they’re sent

29 September 1914

  • newspapers forbidden from publishing information about the movements of troop ships or ships accompanying them

10 November 1914

  • no person can trespass on any place used for telegraphic purposes, interfere with telegraph equipment, or use it without authorisation
  • no person can publish information about the movements of HM’s vessels or the fortifications of any place, such as might be useful for the enemy

17 December 1914

  • Postmaster-General can stop the delivery of mail thought injurious to public safety or to military or naval operations – no-one can act as an intermediary for such communications

15 February 1915

  • no person can publish information about future naval or military operations, the condition of the armed forces; the condition of warships, troop ships, and supply ships; or the state of defensive works

19 July 1915

  • no person shall publish (verbally or in print) any information likely to interfere with the recruiting, training, discipline, or administration of HM’s forces in NZ or abroad; with the successful conduct of military and naval operations; likely to be injurious to public safety during the war; prejudice HM’s relations with foreign powers; spread false statements relative to the war likely to cause alarm; or any make statement indicating disloyalty or disaffection in respect to the war

11 October 1915

  • Minister of Defence may ban the sale of any book he considers injurious to the public interest in respect of the present war – no person can sell or possess such publications

22 February 1916

  • no person may publish lists of the contents of any ship heading for the UK or any place north of the equator
  • no-one may publish anything in such a way as to show that parts had been omitted by the censor
  • military authorities may ban publication of any matter relative to the war

1 March 1916

  • Minister of Defence may prohibit the exhibition of any moving picture which represents or relates to the war

9 January 1917

  • no person can publish or distribute information about the movements of ships which might profitably be destroyed by the enemy

22 December 1917

  • it’s illegal to use invisible ink

18 March 1918

  • anyone who transmits a secret-code telegram from NZ, or who knows of one being sent, is guilty of an offence

23 July 1918

  • Attorney-General may stop the publication of any periodical until it had been censored in the interests of public interest

30 July 1918

  • every ship registered in NZ issued with wireless telegraph equipment to be supplied with certified operators

1914 – 13 July
Regulations for control of ships carrying wireless-telegraph apparatus while within territorial waters of New Zealand (New Zealand Gazette, 16 July 1914, pp.2806-7)

1914 – 3 August
Regulations under the Post and Telegraph Amendment Act 1910, concerning the censorship of mail (New Zealand Gazette, 3 August 1914, pp.3036-7)

  • Governor can close any telegraph station in time of war
  • Governor can authorise the appointment of Censor of telegraphic messages
  • censor would have to view all messages before they were sent
  • censors appointed to telegraph stations at Wellington, Awanui, at or near Nelson, and Bluff (others appointed during the year)

1914 – 7 September
Wireless-telegraph regulations for ship-stations (New Zealand Gazette, 10 September 1914, pp.3496-8)

1914 – 29 September
Prohibiting the publication of information concerning military and naval operations (New Zealand Gazette, 29 September 1914, p.3655)

  • newspapers forbidden from publishing information about the names, destinations, route, dates of departure or arrival, or movements of transports carrying troops or ships accompanying them, or any other matters relative to military or naval operations referred to in future notices in the Gazette

1914 – 10 November
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 November 1914, pp.4021-4) [WRA 1919 pp.22-6]

  • no person can obstruct a person carrying out the orders of a military authority, or withhold information required by them, or trespass on land used for military purposes, or any place used for telegraphic purposes (whether in possession of the Crown or not)
  • no person can publish or spread false reports likely to create disaffection or alarm
  • no person shall have telegraph equipment without authorisation
  • no vessel can leave a defended harbour without permission from the military authority
  • no person can publish or communicate the movements of HM’s vessels, or about fortification or defence of any place, such as might be useful to the enemy
  • no-one can communicate with a prisoner of war except through the post office
  • no-one can show lights at night which might be construed as signalling to the enemy
  • no-one shall interfere with telegraph equipment
  • no-one shall act as intermediary with alien enemies through the post office

 

1914 – 17 December
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 December 1914, pp.4361-3) [WRA 1919 pp.27-9]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914 and 25 November 1914
  • Postmaster-General can stop the delivery of mail from any person, company, or firm, in New Zealand or elsewhere, engaged in any undertaking, correspondence, or communications of a nature injurious to the public safety or conduct of military or naval operations, or order through the Gazette that no postal packet or telegram addressed to or intended for them shall be forwarded or delivered by the Post Office
  • no enemy alien can change their name, or the name of their business, after 22 December 1914 (other than women getting married)
  • no person shall communicate with any person or company in an enemy country
  • no person shall interfere with the censorship of mail
  • no person shall disobey the military government of territory occupied by NZ, such people could be imprisoned
  • lists of banned correspondents (1915 pp.2050, 2352, 2887, 3037, 3911, 4057), (1916: 454, 503, 582, 805, 989, 1868, 2632, 2966, 3142, 3512), (1917: 965, 1228)
  • bans revoked (1916: p.1795), (1917: 1193, 1410, 2211, 3547, 3548), (1918: 2321), (1919: 1382)

1915 – 22 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 February 1915, pp.665-6) [WRA 1919 pp.32-3]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no person can publish or communicate forecasts or plans of future naval and military operations; the organisation, strength, movements, armaments, condition, disposition, or distribution of HM’s troops; the conditions of warships, troop ships, supply ships; the situation, armaments, or state of HM’s defensive works in NZ or elsewhere
  • unless the information is received over British cables and passed by the Censor, or has already appeared in British or New Zealand newspapers, or has been passed for publication by the Chief of the General Staff NZ
  • no person can speak or publish false reports likely to cause disaffection to HM or interfere with the success of military or naval operations

1915 – 19 July
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 July 1915, pp.2473-4) [WRA 1919 pp.33-5]

  • no person shall publish or transmit any information likely to interfere with the recruiting, training, discipline, or administration of HM’s forces in NZ or abroad; with the successful conduct of military and naval operations; likely to be injurious to public safety during the war; prejudice HM’s relations with foreign powers; spread false statements relative to the war likely to cause alarm; or any make statement indicating disloyalty or disaffection in respect to the war
  • ‘publish’ means to make known to individuals or the public at large; ‘HM’s forces’ means forces raised by NZ or British dominions

1916 – 22 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 23 February 1916, pp.542-3) [WRA 1919 pp.44-5]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no-one can probate the will of an enemy alien, or distribute the assets of such as estate, without the permission of the Attorney-General
  • definition of enemy alien of regulations of 19 July 1915 is amended to include Bulgarians
  • no person may publish lists of the contents of ships bound for the UK or any place north of the equator
  • amends the War Regulations of 22 February 1915 prohibiting the publication of information to cover ‘confidential communications’
  • no-one can publish any matter or statement in such a way that it shows parts have been omitted by a censor
  • the military authorities may ban the publication of any matter relative to the war
  • amended 22 September 1924 so that no beneficiary of an estate shall be deemed to be an enemy alien if the deceased person died before the Treaty of Peace (as per s4 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920) (New Zealand Gazette, 2 October 1924, p.2251)
  • amended 24 November 1924 so that the provisions of clause 2 shall not apply to alien enemies who died after the Treaty of Peace (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1924, p.2830)

1916 – 1 March
Regulations censoring moving pictures under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 March 1916, pp.627-8) [WRA 1919 p.46]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Minister of Defence may prohibit the exhibition of any moving picture which represents or relates to the present war

1917 – 9 January
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1917, pp.3-4)

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • it’s an offence to publish or distribute information about the movements of ships from New Zealand which might be profitably destroyed by the enemy

1917 – 5 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 5 February 1917, pp.439-40) [WRA 1919 p.92]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • it’s an offence to publish or distribute information about the movements of ships from New Zealand which might be profitably destroyed by the enemy (cf 9 January 1917)
  • an authorised officer (under the Military Service Act) can arrest and deliver into custody an NZEF soldier suspected of committing an offence under these regulations
  • disaffected enemy aliens may be arrested and detained at the pleasure of the Minister of Defence – extended to include ‘strangers’ (any person not permanently resident in NZ) on 19 November 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 November 1917, p.4276)
  • amended 2 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1917, pp.1209-10) [WRA 1919 p.102]

1918 – 18 March
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1918, p.851) [WRA 1919 p.141]

  • anyone who transmits a secret-code telegram from NZ, or who knows of one being sent, is guilty of an offence under the regulations

1918 – 23 July
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (Censorship Regulations) (New Zealand Gazette, 26 July 1918, pp.2759-61) [WRA 1919 pp.160-3]

  • Attorney-General may stop the publication of any periodical until it had been censored in the interests of public safety

1918 – 30 July
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 1 August 1918, pp.2805-6) [WRA 1919 pp.163-5]

  • every ship registered in NZ that has been issued with wireless-telegraph equipment shall be supplied with two certified operators
  • installations to be licensed by the navy
  • amended 14 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 November 1918, p.3818)

Banned publications and propaganda

1915 – 20 September
Order in Council banned the importation of the newspaper ‘Direct Action or Solidarity’ or any other published by ‘The Industrial Workers of the World’ (New Zealand Gazette, 20 September 1915, p.3265)

1915 – 11 October
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 October 1915, p.3485) [WRA 1919 pp.39-40]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Minister of Defence may ban the sale of any book he considers injurious to the public interest in respect of the present war – no person can sell or possess such publications
  • The International Socialist Review, The Fatherland, Issues and Events, and periodicals printed in German prohibited under this regulation, 29 February 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1916, p.728)
  • authority for making decisions transferred from Minister of Defence to the Attorney-General; Customs may seize any such literature entering the country; definition of literature to be banned slightly amended, 18 June 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 June 1918, p.2403) [WRA 1919 pp.150-1]
  • restrictions on printing and distributing prohibited material expanded, 26 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 July 1918, p.2761)
  • ‘The Black Prophet’ by Guy Fitch Phelps banned 28 June 1918, and the periodical ‘The Green Ray’, published in Dunedin, banned 3 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 July 1918, p.2494)
  • the pamphlet ‘Gold for Iron’, issued by the Auckland Branch of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, banned 19 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 July 1918, p.2735)
  • the periodical ‘Novi Svijet’ (New World), published in Auckland by the Jugo-Slav Publishing Company, banned from NZ as of 6 June 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 June 1919, p.1779)

1916 – 21 December
Prohibiting the importation into New Zealand of certain newspapers and periodical literature (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, pp.3955-6)

  • following publications banned in the public interest under s46 of the Customs Act 1913 and s2 of the Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914: Atlanta American, Atlanta Georgian, Boston American, Chicago American, Chicago Examiner, Los Angeles Examiner, Los Angeles Herald, Morgan Journal, New York American, New York Deutsches Journal, New York Evening Journal, San Francisco Examiner, San Francisco Sunday American, Sunday Georgian, Cosmopolitan Magazine, Good Housekeeping Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Hearst’s Magazine, Motor Magazine, Motor Boating Magazine, Ross’s Magazine, Bull (illustrated newspaper)
  • ‘The Gaelic American’ added to the list, 16 January 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1917, p.167)
  • ‘Ross’s Monthly’, published by R.S. Ross, 345 Queen St, Melbourne, added to the list 12 February 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 February 1917, p.539)
  • ‘The Delineator’ and ‘The Masses’ added to the list 12 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 March 1917, p.987) – ban on ‘The Delineator’ lifted on 16 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 April 1918, p.1059)

1917 – 30 November
Direct Action, Solidarity, and all other printed matter published by the ‘International Workers of the World’ banned from New Zealand (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1917, p.4441)

1919 – 26 July
The periodical ‘The International’, published by the International Socialist League (S.A.), Johannesburg, or any other matter published by them, banned from NZ under s46 of the Customs Act 1913 and s2 of the Trade and Commerce Amendment Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1919, p.2434)

1919 – 6 October
Prohibiting the importation into NZ of a certain publication (New Zealand Gazette, 9 October 1919, p.3098)

  • periodical called ‘Knowledge and Unity’, published in Brisbane

1919 – 27 November
Prohibiting the importation into NZ of a certain publication (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1919, p.3636)

  • book called ‘Red Europe’, by Frank Anstey, MP, published in Melbourne

1920 – 7 January
Prohibiting the importation into NZ of a certain publication (New Zealand Gazette, 15 January 1920, p.157

  • book called ‘The New Unionism’ by Andre Tridon, published in New York

1920 – 16 March
Prohibiting the importation into NZ of Sinn Fein Irish Republic Brotherhood badges and portraits of Eamonn de Valera of the so-called Irish Republic (New Zealand Gazette, 18 March 1920, p.894)

 

Soldiers in New Zealand – rules and benefits

Serving liquor to soldiers and six o’clock closing

1915 – 16 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914, prohibiting the sale liquor to soldiers in uniform other than on the premises where it’s sold (New Zealand Gazette, 18 February 1915, p.645) [WRA 1919 p.32]

1915 – 15 November
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 November 1915, pp.3813-4) [WRA 1919 pp.40-2]

  • no person shall take liquor on board a troop-train

1915 – 29 November
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1915, p.3937) [WRA 1919 p.42]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no person shall take liquor to a military camp, or be found in possession of it there

1916 – 21 August
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2801-3) [WRA 1919 pp.64-6]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • anyone who buys liquor for soldiers commits an offence against these regulations (ie ‘anti-shouting’)
  • this doesn’t include liquor served with a meal or by a boardinghouse keeper
  • no woman may enter or remain near a bar after 6pm
  • constables may search bars for breaches at any time
  • technically amended 28 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 1916, p.2876) [WRA 1919 pp.73-4], 2 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 April 1918, p.948 [WRA 1919 pp.142-3]
  • no proceedings under these regulations to be taken against constables, 21 December 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, p.3955)

1916 – 2 October
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 2 October 1916, pp.3157-9) [WRA 1919 pp.76-8]

  • the Police may apply to a Licensing Board to have a publican’s license cancelled if they’re found guilty of breaching s3 of the War Regulations Act 1916 relating to the sale of liquor, that he has permitted his premises to be frequented by disorderly or disreputable persons, that he has failed to conduct orderly premises, or that he is not a fit and proper person to hold such a license

1917 – 27 October
Sale of liquor restriction Act 1917

  • pubs shall be closed between 6pm Saturday night and 9am Monday morning, and between 6pm and 9am each other day of the week until six months after the end of the war
  • clause limiting six o’clock closing to the end of the war abolished by s2 of the Licensing Amendment Act of 10 December 1918

1918 – 4 June
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 8 June 1918, p.2159) [WRA 1919 pp.149-50]

  • no person can supply liquor to any member of the NZEF after they’ve been called into camp when that person is undergoing medical treatment; likewise those discharged on medical grounds and undergoing treatment; other than that prescribed by a medical practitioner
  • continued by s20 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1918 – 3 September
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 3 September 1918, pp.3121-2) [WRA 1919 pp.173-5]

  • intended to ensure the health, efficiency, and discipline of soldiers returning from overseas service by restricting the sale and supply of liquor
  • military authorities may order the closure of pubs until further notice (not exceeding 24 hours) in parts of Auckland, Wellington, Lyttelton, or Dunedin within 15 miles of the post office when troop ships arrive there
  • 15 miles extended to 25 miles, 2 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 December 1918, p.3867) [WRA 1919 pp.184-5]
  • excludes liquor being shipped through the wharf, 18 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 February 1919, p.457) [WRA 1919 p.185]
  • the named ports exchanged for ‘any ports in NZ’; the four main ports limited to 10 miles from the port, 25 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 February 1919, p.549) [WRA 1919 p.188]

1918 – 10 December
Licensing Amendment Act 1918

  • permits a special licensing poll on national prohibition

1918 – 18 December
Defence Act 1909 – additional regulations as to the discipline of the Defence Forces (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1919, pp.15-16)

  • no soldier undergoing medical treatment consume liquor or bring it into a hospital without permission of the officer in charge
  • soldiers undergoing medical treatment shall be guilty of an offence if they go AWOL, neglect orders, attend any political meeting in uniform, accept payment for civil employment before discharge, appear improperly dressed in public, behaves in an inappropriate or unsoldierly manner, fails to report venereal disease, disobeys the rules of the rules of the hospital, is in possession of liquor on a train or gets intoxicated, disobeys commands, is guilty of misconduct which aggravates medical problems
  • Commanding Officers can summarily fine offenders £2 to be deducted from pay
  • amended 22 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 March 1919, pp.857-8)

Soldiers and prostitution

1916 – 21 August
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2801-3) [WRA 1919 pp.64-6]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • anyone who buys liquor for soldiers commits an offence against these regulations (ie ‘anti-shouting’)
  • this doesn’t include liquor served with a meal or by a boardinghouse keeper
  • no woman may enter or remain near a bar after 6pm
  • constables may search bars for breaches at any time
  • technically amended 28 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 1916, p.2876) [WRA 1919 pp.73-4], 2 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 April 1918, p.948
  • no proceedings under these regulations to be taken against constables, 21 December 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, p.3955)

1916 – 21 August
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2803-4) [WRA 1919 pp.67-8]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • it’s an offence to keep a ‘house of ill-fame’ (ie a brothel) or permits premises to be used for one, or for women to loiter for the purposes of prostitution, or for a man over 15 years live on the earnings of a prostitute
  • premises can be searched, and person can be ordered to not live within 50 miles of the premises for six months

Military camps and manoeuvres

1915 – 20 September
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 September 1915, pp.3263-4) [WRA 1919 pp.36-9]

  • Minister of Defence may declare highways adjoining or intersecting camps to be closed except for military purposes – it will no longer be a highway henceforth but part of the camp
  • highway adjacent to Featherston Camp to be closed for traffic except with the consent of the military authorities, 15 December 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 23 December 1915, p.4121) – extended 12 March 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 April 1916, pp.1053-4)

1915 – 12 October
Gaming Amendment Act 1915

  • amends s5 of the Gaming Amendment Act 1910
  • Minister of Internal Affairs may issue licenses to use the totalisator to racing clubs whose activities have been interrupted for military purposes up to a total of the number of days missed
  • repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1915 – 15 November
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 November 1915, pp.3813-4) [WRA 1919 pp.40-2]

  • no person shall take liquor on board a troop-train

1915 – 29 November
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1915, p.3937) [WRA 1919 p.42]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no person shall take liquor to a military camp, or be found in possession of it there

1916 – 5 August
Regulations for the Administration and Equipment of Camps and Barracks under the Defence Act 1909 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 August 1916, pp.2620-7)

  • outlines the administration, general regulations, charge and allotment of barracks, gas-supply, electric lighting, electric lamps, barrack expense stores, equipment of barracks, charges for loss, marching-out inspections, fire-engines, repair of stores, demands for expense stores, etc
  • technical amendment issued 12 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 March 1917, p.1024)

1916 – 8 December
Declaring certain lands to be available for military manoeuvres under the Military Manoeuvres Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 January 1917, p.9)

  • ‘Featherston Military Training Camp Manoeuvre Area. All that area bounded by a line commencing at a point 6 chains south and 1 mile 64 chains west of Huritene Trig. Station in Block XIV, Wairarapa Survey District; thence due north, 17 miles 20 chains; thence due east, 13 miles 10 chains; thence due south, 17 miles 20 chains; and thence due west 13 miles 10 chains, to the place of commencement.’
  • ‘Trentham Military Camp Manoeuvre Area. All that area bounded by a line commencing at a point 24 chains south and 43 chains west of Fitzherbert Trig. Station in Block XIV; Belmont Survey District; thence due north 11 miles 50 chains; thence due east, 11 miles 50 chains; thence due south to the northern boundary of Rimutaka Survey District; thence along the summit of the range of Mount Climie south-westward to a point due east of the place of commencement, and thence due west to the place of commencement.’

1916 – 18 December
Regulations under the War Regulation Act 1914 concerning land around camps (New Zealand Gazette, 10 January 1917, p.5) [WRA 1919 p.88]

  • Minister of Defence can declare and land within one mile of a training camp to be deemed included in and to form part of that camp
  • people who live within that area will follow the instructions of the Camp Commandant

1917 – 29 January
Regulations under the Military Manoeuvres Act 1915 concerning compensation for land owners (New Zealand Gazette, 8 February 1917, p.466)

1917 – 8 March
Land deemed to be included in military camps for sanitary purposes, under Regulations of 18 December 1916 and published 10 January 1917

  • Trentham Camp
  • Featherston Camp
  • Tauherenikau Camp

Protections from prosecution

1916 – 31 July
Additional war regulations exempting soldiers of the Expeditionary Forces from arrest on civil process or under the Destitute Persons Act (New Zealand Gazette, 31 July 1916, pp.2563-4)

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no-one can arrest a soldier, or prosecute them, under the Destitute Persons Act 1910 or the Imprisonment for Debt Limitation Act 1908
  • amended 28 May 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 May 1917, p.2155)
  • repealed and replaced 29 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 May 1919, pp.1279-80)

1917 – 16 March
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 19 March 1917, p.997

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no-one can commence civil proceedings or file a bankruptcy petition against the property of a soldier
  • amended 28 May 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 May 1917, p.2155), 18 June 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 June 1917, p.2430), 7 May 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 May 1918, p.1756) [WRA 1919 pp.146-7]
  • amended 18 June 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 June 1917, p.2430) so that consent to prosecute a soldier can be given by the Attorney-General only when recommended by a Stipendiary Magistrate
  • repealed and replaced 29 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 May 1919, pp.1279-80)
  • section relating to the protection of guarantors of soldiers against judicial and other process continued by s19 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1917 – 1 October
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914, concerning the protection of property of soldiers (New Zealand Gazette, 1 October 1917, pp.3710-1)

  • adds to regulations of 31 July 1916, 16 March 1917, 28 May 1917, 18 June 1917, under which ‘protection has been given to soldiers against arrest, bankruptcy, distress for rent, and execution of civil process […] it is expedient to give further protection to soldiers in respect of the enforcement of securities over their property’
  • no-one can exercise the power of sale of soldiers’ property without leave from the Attorney-General – doesn’t apply to any mortgage, bill of sale, or security to which the Mortgages Extension Act 1914 is applicable
  • repealed and replaced 29 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 May 1919, pp.1279-80) [WRA 1919 pp.200-2]

1917 – 31 October
War Legislation Act 1917

  • Stipendiary Magistrate may modify burdensome contracts for the relief of soldiers (s14-15)
  • provisions relating to the relief of people with contracts impinged upon by war regulations (s16-17) – amended 10 December 1918 by s31 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918

1918 – 10 December
War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918 [WRA 1919 pp.20-1]

  • Minister of Justice and Attorney General have the power to cancel a warrant of arrest against a serving member of the NZEF (s25)
  • extends protection of soldiers from judicial process to cover relief from burdensome contracts (provided by s14 of the War Legislation Act 1917) (s26)

1919 – 29 April
War regulations for the protection of soldiers and discharged soldiers (Soldiers’ Protection Regulations, 1919) (New Zealand Gazette, 2 May 1919, pp.1279-80) [WRA 1919 pp.200-2]

  • soldiers or discharged soldiers protected from the execution of civil judgments and process, bankruptcy, forfeitures etc
  • made under War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918 s26 
  • revokes previous orders of council of 31 July 1916, 16 March 1917, 18 June 1917, 1 October 1917
  • definition of ‘recently discharged soldier’ extended from 6 to 12 months, 2 June 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 June 1919, p.1745) [WRA 1919 pp.203-4]
  • allows power boards to seek pursue discharged soldiers for unpaid sums (New Zealand Gazette, 20 December 1923, p.2985
  • continued by s22 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

Trusteeship of soldiers’ property

1916 – 2 September
Regulations under the War Regulations Amendment Act 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 September 1916, pp.2935-6) [WRA 1919 pp.74-5]

  • an attorney, agent, trustee, executor, or administrator in the NZEF may delegate their responsibilities to the Public Trustee
  • a minor in the NZEF may pass power of attorney to any person
  • amended 26 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 March 1917, p.1054 [WRA 1919 p.101]

1917 – 2 April
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments for the management of soldiers’ properties (Soldiers’ Property Regulations 1917) (New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1917, pp.1211-13) [WRA 1919 pp.103-5]

  • to make provision for the management and disposition of the business, property, and affairs of NZEF soldiers
  • Minister of Defence may, on the recommendation of the National Efficiency Board, constitute Soldiers’ Property Boards of Trustees to carry these regulations into effect
  • soldier may by power of attorney appoint any Board of Trustees to manage his property, business, or affairs (to be confirmed by the National Efficiency Board)
  • the Boards shall continue after the death or incapacity of a soldier, only to finish three months after a soldier gives notice or their will is probated
  • the National Efficiency Board to administer these Boards
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: John Lamont, A.J. Clanfield, J.C. Petersen, Theobald Meagher, C.M. Wood, W.H. Gladding, G.C. Wilson, and Reginald Roberts, 1 November 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 November 1917, p.4201) (I’ve obviously missed some earlier ones – the dates of first gazettal are listed in the cancellation notices)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: John Lamont (No. 2), and John Birmingham, 26 November 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1917, p.4363)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: John Gladding (No. 2), 29 January 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 31 January 1918, p.348)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: C.L. McFarland, John Biggar, George Biggar, 21 February 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 February 1918, p.643)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: W.S. Glenny, John Lorrett, F.M. Goggin, 6 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 April 1918, p.1033)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: James Cain, Felix Baker, 18 June 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 June 1918, p.2462
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Simon Brophy, H.W. Howorth, 19 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 July 1918, p.2735)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: John William Neate, 20 September 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 September 1918, p.3362
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Lancelot Edmund Athelstan Hitchings, 23 October 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 October 1918, p.3593)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Stephen Robson and Frederick William Innes, 7 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 November 1918, p.3710)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Harold Arthur Hopkins, Richard John Stevenson Gray, and William Hicks, 25 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 December 1918, p.3904)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Edward Joseph Williams, 22 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 February 1919, p.593)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: William Hicks, 9 January 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1919, p.109)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: H.A. Hopkins and J.C. Petersen on 30 January, and James Cain on 3 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 February 1919, p.357)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Reginald Roberts, Stephen Robson, James Young, Richard John Stevenson Gray, John William Neate, 19 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 February 1919, p.441)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: William Stanley Glenny, Frederick William Innes, 27 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 March 1919, p.676)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: George Frederick Bulfin, Garret Barry, C.M. Wood, John Lamont, John Lamont (No. 2), on 11 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 March 1919, p.727)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: E.S. Jameson, 18 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1919, p.826)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: L.E.A. Hitchings, 25 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 March 1919, p.868)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: William Reilly, 14 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 April 1919, p.1035) 
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: G. Edwards and A.J. Clanfield, 7 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 May 1919, p.1319)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: E.J. Williams, 8 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 May 1919, p.1382)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: F.W. Rush, 16 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 May 1919, p.62)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: L.B. Brown, 4 June 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 June 1919, p.1766)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: E.W. Larsen, 5 June 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 June 1919, p.1798)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Felix Baker and John Lorrett, 7 July 1919, p.2335)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: C.L. MacFarland, 19 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1919, p.2685)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: F.M. Goggin, 25 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 1919, p.2746)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: F.G. Leahy, John Birmingham, F.J. Hodges, 29 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 September 1919, p.2789)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: A.B. Irvine and H.W. Howarth, 4 September 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 September 1919, p.2845)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Thomas Brennan, 17 October 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 23 October 1919, p.3212)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: W.H. Gladding and W.H. Gladding (No. 2), 30 October 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 November 1919, p.3393)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: J. Biggar and G. Biggar, 8 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 November 1919, p.3461)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Thomas Bate, 1 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1919, p.3668)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Simon Brophy, 2 February 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 February 1920, p.509)
  • both the National Efficiency Board and the Soldiers’ Property Regulations (which the NEB administered) revoked, 17 February 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 February 1920, p.676)

1918 – 27 August
War regulations for the protection of soldiers’ businesses (Soldiers’ Business Regulations) (New Zealand Gazette, 27 August 1918, pp.3067-70) [WRA 1919 pp.168-73]

  • the businesses of soldiers in the present war are essential to the public welfare, so steps need to be taken for the maintenance and management of such businesses; likewise, provisions should be made to restrict businesses which compete with those of soldiers
  • National Efficiency Board can force businesses competing directly with soldiers’ businesses to operate under a restricted business license, which sets such restrictions on business as the NEB deems appropriate
  • one option is the restricted business paying some profits to the Board of Trustees controlling the protected business (Boards of Trustees being those created under the Soldiers’ Property Regulations 1917 of 2 April 1917)
  • business will remain protected when a soldier dies, but protection will cease when the soldier is discharged from the NZEF
  • no-one can start a business directly competing with a soldier’s business without the permission of the NEB
  • revoked 3 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 November 1919, p.3371)

Financial assistance to soldiers or their families

1914 – 5 November
War Contributions Validation (No. 2) Act 1914

  • local authorities empowered to make payments to relatives of employees who join the NZEF upon whom they depend
  • the whole Act repealed by the third schedule of the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919

1917 – 16 January
Regulations under the Defence Act 1909 (etc) concerning temporary exemption of voluntary recruits from the NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1917, pp.163-4) [WRA 1919 pp.91-2]

  • Minister of Defence permitted to exempt a voluntary recruit from military service if their work is essential industry or their service would cause hardship
  • regulations of 16 January 1917, 16 April 1917, and 30 January 1918 amended by Order in Council on 18 June 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 June 1918, pp.2401-3)

1917 – 16 January
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916 (etc) concerning financial assistance for soldiers of the NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1917, pp.165-7)

  • when a reservist or voluntary recruit complains that his service would cause hardship for his family, Military Service Board can make a grant of financial assistance to his family not exceeding £2 a week, to continue for no more than 26 weeks after a soldier’s death
  • the financial assistance should go towards rent, interest payments on loans,  mortgages and purchase arrangements, rates and taxes, insurance premiums, expenses in keeping his business going
  • arrangements reached since passage of Military Service Act not eligible
  • these regulations technically amended on 16 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 April 1917, pp.1295-6), 25 June 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 June 1917, p.2510), 6 August 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 August 1917, p.3059), 13 January 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 February 1918, pp.377-8)
  • revoked and replaced 18 June 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 June 1918, pp.2401-3)

1917 – 22 December
War Bursaries (New Zealand Gazette, 10 January 1918, pp.23-4)

  • outlining the terms of bursaries offered to the children of soldiers of the NZEF killed in action or incapacitated, to get a place at a technical college, a secondary school, or university (enabled by s30 of the War Legislation Act 1917)

1918 – 18 June
Regulations as to financial assistance for soldiers of the NZEF (Financial Assistance Regulations 1918) (New Zealand Gazette, 21 June 1918, pp.2401-3)

  • orders in council of 16 January 1917, 16 April 1917, and 30 January 1918 revoked
  • Military Service Boards constituted as commissions of inquiry with the power to award grants to soldiers’ families in cases or hardship

1919 – 10 June
Further regulations as to the financial assistance of discharged soldiers of the expeditionary forces (New Zealand Gazette, 10 June 1919, pp.1783-4)

  • Expeditionary Forces Amendment Act 1918 s7 provides for bonuses to be paid to men honourably discharged from the NZEF after overseas service
  • order in council of 18 June 1918 (the Financial Assistance Regulations 1918) allow grants of financial assistance to soldiers to allow them to meet certain financial obligations; earlier regulations on 16 January 1917 – extended 5 November 1919 by s24 of the Finance Act 1919
  • additional bonus might be available if recommended by a Military Service Board

Mortgage and rent restrictions

See also Crown land and Crown tenants

1914 – 14 August
Mortgages Extension Act 1914

  • mortgagees cannot call up the principal, exercise power of sale, commence action for breach of agreement, or increase interest over property they hold
  • to continue until 31 December 1915
  • technically amended 12 September 1914 (Mortgages Extension Amendment Act 1914) and 5 November 1914 (Mortgages Extension Amendment Act (No. 2) 1914 Act 1914), 31 October 1917 (s25 of the War Legislation Act 1917), 15 April 1918 (s24 of the Finance Act 1918), period shall expire 31 August 1919 (as per the Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1918), 30 August 1919 (s3 of the Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919)

1916 – 7 August
War Legislation Amendment Act 1916

  • prohibits raising rent beyond ‘standard rent’ – detailed explanation – to conclude six months after the end of the war (s2-10 – Part I)
  • continued until 31 August 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920 (28 August 1920)
  • extended to 31 July 1924 by the Rent Restriction Continuance Act 1923 (30 July 1923) (amendments and extensions go on through the 1920s and 30s)
  • amended 31 July 1924 by the Rent Restriction Act 1924

1917 – 31 October
War Legislation Act 1917

  • Inspector of Factories may apply on behalf of tenants to have the capital value of dwelling houses ascertained (Part IV)
  • Part IV continued until 31 August 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920 (28 August 1920)

1918 – 10 December
War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918

  • no order of recovery of a dwelling house under Part I of the War Legislation Amendment Act 1916 can be made to eject a soldier or discharged soldier (or their wife or widow) if they were still maintaining the property properly and paying rent (s13)
  • amended 5 November 1919 by s53 of the Housing Act 1919
  • s13 continued until 31 August 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920 (28 August 1920)

Holding jobs and benefits open during service

1914 – 2 November
Friendly Societies Amendment Act 1914

  • amends Friendly Societies Act 1909
  • contributions of members who join the NZEF may be postponed
  • to expire 31 December 1915 (extended)
  • repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 7 August
War Legislation Amendment Act 1916

  • a member of Parliament on active service shall not be struck from the roll of his district, and they shall retain their Parliamentary honorarium so long as they remain a member of Parliament (s22) – repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920
  • local bodies may claim back expenses of assisting the local Recruiting Board with recruiting (s24)
  • local bodies may pay the life insurance premiums of its employees in the NZEF as per s3 of the Local Authorities Empowering Act 1915 (s25) - s25 repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920
  • apprenticeships may be suspended for members of the NZEF (s28) – repealed by s40 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918
  • no mining privileges will be forfeited by those holders engaged in military service (s30)
  • mineral leases over certain lands in the Nelson Land District protected (s31)

1918 – 10 December
War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918

  • any apprentice who’s apprenticeship was interrupted by serving in the navy or army in any capacity, the apprenticeship shall be deemed to be suspended for the war and six months following (s40)

Religious objectors

1917 – 24 April
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916 concerning non-combatant service for religious objectors (New Zealand Gazette, 24 April 1917, p.1399)

  • ‘religious objector’ means a reservist who has been exempted from military service by a Military Service Board under s18(e) of the Military Service Act 1916
  • religious objectors to carry out such non-combatant work as the executive government decides, at the same rate of pay as a NZEF soldier, and will be entitled to such lodging and rations as soldiers, but won’t have to wear uniform

Crown land and Crown tenants

1914 – 5 November
Land Laws Amendment Act 1914

  • Minister may exempt any lessee or licensee of Crown law from the provisions of their lease of licenses relating to crop rotation – until 30 June 1917 (s42)
  • Minister may postpone the payment of for up to 4 months – until 31 August 1915 (s43)
  • Minister may postpone the payment of rent of small grazing runs (s44)
  • sections 42-44 of 1914 Act expire on 31 August 1920 (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)
  • s42-44 continued until 31 August 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920 (28 August 1920)
  • s42-3 continued until 31 December 1921 and s44 repealed 22 March 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1921
  • s42 continued until 31 December 1922 by the Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1921-22 (11 February 1922)

1915 – 12 October
Land Laws Amendment Act 1915

  • Minister may exempt members of the NZEF who are Crown tenants from rent (s23)
  • a member of the NZEF can appoint an agent to apply for Crown land on their behalf (s24) - amended by s11 of the War Legislation Amendment Act 1916
  • s24 repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 7 August
War Legislation Amendment Act 1916

  • age limit of people who can apply for Crown land under s51(d) of the Lands for Settlements Act 1908 shall not apply to people engaged in military service outside NZ (s12)
  • Minister of Lands may postpone payment instalments for NZEF men holding licenses to Crown land (s13)

University degrees

1915 – 12 October
New Zealand University Amendment Act 1915

  • amends New Zealand University Act 1908
  • permits the University of NZ to award degrees to soldiers who have not completed their studies due to military service but have shown a level of proficiency consistent with their being awarded their degrees
  • ‘power may be exercised during the continuance of the present war and a reasonable time after a state of war has ceased to exist’ (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

Repatriation

1916 – 31 January
Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914 (Section 25) – suspending the provisions of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act 1908 and its amendments, and all awards and industrial agreements preventing or restricting the employment of discharged soldiers (New Zealand Gazette, 10 February 1916, p.449)

  • Inspector of Factories may direct that discharged soldiers may be employed in an industry on the wages and conditions the Inspector deems appropriate
  • revoked 3 December 1917

1917 – 3 December
The Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914 (section 25) – suspending the provisions of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act 1908 and its amendments, and of all awards and industrial agreements in so far as they prevent or restrict the training and employment of discharged soldiers in certain industries (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1917, pp.4439-40)

  • order-in-council of 31 January 1916, suspending awards and agreements for discharged soldiers, revoked
  • new criteria set
  • revoked and replaced 15 July 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 July 1919, pp.2376-8)

1919 – 22 February
Regulations under the Repatriation Act 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1918, p.3573)

  • lists offences under the Act (falsely claiming money or misusing money)

1919 – 15 July
The Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914 (Section 25), and the Repatriation Act 1918 (Section 15) – suspending the provisions of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act 1908, and its amendments, and of all awards and industrial agreements in so far as they prevent or restrict the training and employment of discharged soldiers in certain industries, and providing for the granting of assistance to discharged soldiers while so employed (New Zealand Gazette, 15 July 1919, pp.2376-8)

  • order in council of 3 December 1917 revoked and replaced
  • Repatriation Dept may arrange for discharged soldiers to get experience in any line of work, and set their rates of pay

1919 – 5 November
Finance Act 1919

  • Repatriation Board may make payments to discharged soldiers out of the War Expenses Account during periods of unemployment (s16-18)

1920 – 11 November
Finance Act 1920

  • Repatriation Dept may release mortgages or other securities in respect of grants of financial assistance

1921 – 1 February
Regulations under the Repatriation Act 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 February 1921, p.497)

  • the Repatriation Department may release a security once the terms have been fulfilled

Soldiers’ wills

1916 – 7 August
War Legislation Amendment Act 1916

  • soldiers’ wills exempted from the usual rules of will-making (co-signing witnesses etc), assuming the soldier died during the war or six months following, even if not in military service
  • such wills won’t apply to freehold native lands – succession will apply as if no will had been made
  • applies to all soldiers’ wills made since the beginning of the war
  • technically amended 10 December 1918 by s23 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918
  • still in force (New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

Expeditionary Forces Voting Act

1914 – 4 September
Expeditionary Forces Voting Act 1914

  • members of NZEF entitled to vote in the next general election and licensing poll – how it’s to be done
  • Expeditionary Forces Voting (No. 2) Act 1914 (5 November 1914) extends the entitlement to Maori members of NZEF voting in Maori electoral districts (No. 2 Act repealed by the third schedule of the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919)
  • original Act repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1917 – 29 September
Parliamentary Representation (Expeditionary Forces) Adjustment Act 1917

  • Minister of Defence to provide a return of the number of men (broken into Maori and others) serving overseas in the NZEF, or in military camps in NZ, as of the date of the last census – 15 October 1916
  • repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1919 – 5 November
Expeditionary Forces Voting and Electoral Rights Amendment Act 1919

  • members of NZEF qualified to vote in general election and licensing poll
  • provisions relating to voting in the general election and licensing poll repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

War pensions

1915 – 5 August
War Pensions Act 1915

  • pensions may be paid to soldiers or their families in cases of death or disablement (s3)
  • War Pensions Boards created to assess applications for pensions (s4)
  • maximum rates of death pensions set out in First Schedule, disablement pensions in Second Schedule (s5)
  • increased payments may be made when assistant required (s6)
  • the claims of wives and children to have precedence over other dependants (s7)
  • natives married by native custom will be deemed to have a legitimate marriage and legitimate children (s8)
  • a widow’s pension to end 2 years after remarriage (s9)
  • orphans get an increased pension (s10)
  • payment to female child to end at 17; pension to mentally or physically defective children to continue until such time as the Board decides (s11)
  • rules around applications (s12)
  • payments may be made to parents whose future means are inadequate (s13)
  • pensions only payable to people resident in NZ (s14)
  • other payments and gratuities made to soldier to be taken into consideration when setting the rate of pension, including property ownership and other sources of income (s15) – property clause removed by s9 of the War Pensions Amendment Act 1916)
  • pensions may be reviewed (s16)
  • pensions to commence from date of death or date of discharge (s17)
  • pension inalienable against sale, assignment, insolvency etc (s18)
  • pension can be suspended or withdrawn if crimes committed (s19-20)
  • Minister may make payments to dependants pending grant of pension (s21)
  • nurses and other who served also eligible for pensions (s22)
  • conditions by which pensions to be eligible to dependants of men reported missing (s23)
  • inquiry to be made into cases of illegitimate children (s24)

1915 – 23 August
Regulations under War Pensions Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 August 1915, pp.3026-9)

  • how to make pension claims (including forms)
  • how pensions would be paid
  • agents may be appointed
  • pensions may be reviewed

1915 – 12 October
Defence Amendment Act 1915

  • the provisions of the War Pensions Act 1915 are extended to members of the NZEF while in NZ and their dependants (s2(1))
  • War Pensions Board may take the fact that death occurred in NZ into consideration in computing the amount of a pension (s2(2))
  • repealed 8 July 1916 by the War Pensions Amendment Act 1916 (s3)

1915 – 29 November
Additional regulations under War Pensions Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1915, pp.3939-40)

  • maximum pensions for nurses and dependants amended (New Zealand Gazette, 6 November 1919, p.3378)

1916 – 8 July
War Pensions Amendment Act 1916

  • Act extended to members of the Force serving in NZ (s4)
  • pensions paid to parents in special cases (s7)
  • pensions may be paid to family members even if pensioner not living in NZ (s8)
  • a pensioner’s income and property not to be taken into consideration when determining their pension (s9)
  • rates paid to children increased (s11)
  • members of navy eligible for pensions (s12)
  • pensions may be granted to people other than dependants who can prove they have suffered material loss of income or property following a man’s death (s13)
  • limitations to applications (s14-15)

1917 – 27 October
War Pensions Amendment Act 1917

  • pension rates increased (s2)
  • fixed rates established for different types of injury (listed in Third Schedule) (s3) – amended 29 August 1923 by s16 of the War Pensions Amendment Act 1923
  • War Pension Board may raise rates in special cases – increased from a maximum of ten shillings a week to £1 (s4-5)
  • Board can halve the payment of a soldier refusing necessary medical treatment (s6)
  • Board can increase pension payments for men who have to live away from home for medical treatment (s7)
  • Board can award a temporary rate in cases where disablement hasn’t yet reached its furthest point (s8)
  • Board may increase pension payable to widows and children if rate is insufficient (s10-12)
  • Board may grant pension to a widowed mother if she depended on the deceased son  (s13)
  • supplementary pensions to be issued in certain cases to people in receipt of Imperial pensions (s14)
  • rates of pensions for different ranks outlines in First Schedule
  • amended 5 November 1919 to clarify wives’ rights and to extend the pension to veterans of the Boer War (s12-13 of the Finance Act 1919)

1918 – 8 April
Additional regulations under War Pensions Act 1915, concerning pensions for disabled soldiers and medical treatment (New Zealand Gazette, 9 May 1918, pp.1766-7)

1919 – 29 April
Regulations under the War Pensions Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 May 1919, p.1297)

  • sets maximum rates of pension under s22 of the Act

1920 – 11 November
Finance Act 1920

  • War Pensions Medical Appeal Board appointed to consider appeals to pension applications rejected by the War Pensions Boards, on the grounds that death or injuries were not war-related – Appeal Board has the power to overturn the decision and award pensions (s2)

1923 – 29 August
War Pensions Amendment Act 1923

  • disabled member of armed forces may be issued an ‘economic pension’, as may his wife, family, or widowed mother (s3-8)
  • additional allowance available to disabled soldier requiring an assistant (s9)
  • constitutes War Pensions Appeal Board (s10)
  • attribution of death or disablement to war service to be determined by whether it happened with 7 years of discharge and reasonable evidence that that is the case (s11)
  • women and children to receive death pension if soldier dies within seven years after they received the injury (s13)

1924 – 16 June
Regulations prescribing the procedure of the War Pensions Appeal Board and other matter (New Zealand Gazette, 16 June 1924, pp.1499-1504)

1926 – 22 March
Regulations under the War Pensions Act 1915 and War Pensions Amendment Act 1923 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 April 1926, pp.859-60)

Discharged soldier settlement

1915 – 11 October
Discharged Soldiers Settlement Act 1915

  • areas of Crown land can be set aside for settlement by discharged soldiers (s3-4)
  • finance can be made available (s6-7)
  • £50,000 to be raised to finance scheme (s8)
  • no right of transfer until 10 years had passed (s11)
  • right to war pension not affected by the Act (s13)

1915 – 8 November
Regulations under the Discharged Soldiers Settlement Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 November 1915, pp.3764-7)

  • amended regulations issued 13 November 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 November 1916, p.3563); amended 2 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 April 1917, p.1223); 30 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 May 1917, pp.1981-2); 11 February 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 14 February 1918, p.490); 8 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 April 1918, p.1007)
  • revoked and replaced 20 August 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 August 1918, p.3021-34)

1916 – 7 March
Regulations regarding advances under the Discharged Soldiers Settlement Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 March 1916, pp.787-8)

  • amended 15 October 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 October 1917, pp.3935-7)
  • revoked and replaced, 20 August 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 August 1918, p.3021-34)

1916 – 8 July
Discharged Soldiers Settlement Amendment Act 1916

  • land also available to officers at the termination of their appointment (s2)
  • NZ men who served in other forces also eligible for land (s3)
  • financial assistance provisions extended (s4)
  • land may be taken under Public Works Act (s5)
  • increased authority to raise money for purposes of Act (s6-7)

1917 – 31 October
Discharged Soldiers Settlement Amendment Act 1917

  • discharged soldiers may also receive financial assistance for purchasing or leasing land, clearing and improving it, discharging mortgages, and purchasing plant (s2)
  • discharged soldiers may apply to the Land Board to have private land purchased on their behalf (s3)
  • land may be set aside for soldiers’ dwellings (s4)
  • contracts with soldiers to be valid even if they’re under 21 years (s5)
  • kauri gum cannot be dug on land set aside for soldiers (s6)

1918 – 8 April
Regulations regarding advances under section 2 of the Discharged Soldiers Settlement Amendment Act 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 April 1918, pp.1008-11)

  • revoked and replaced, 20 August 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 August 1918, p.3021-34)

1918 – 30 April
Regulations regarding dwellings for discharged soldiers under section 4 of the Discharged Soldiers Settlement Amendment Act 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 30 April 1918, pp.1702-5)

1918 – 20 August
Regulations under the Discharged Soldiers Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 August 1918, p.3021-34)

  • amended 4 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 November 1918, p.3699); 17 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 December 1918, p.4020), 24 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 May 1919, p.1247); 29 July 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 31 July 1919, p.2479); 19 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1919, p.2659); 22 September 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 September 1919, p.2985); 23 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 January 1920, p.23); 1 April 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 April 1920, p.1058); 14 May 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 May 1920, pp.1547-8); 22 November 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 November 1920, p.3145); 29 November 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 December 1920, p.3215)

1919 – 5 November
Discharged Soldiers Settlement Amendment Act 1919

  • Crown may resume land from Land Boards for the purpose of the Act (s2)
  • financial benefits may be extended to widow or other near relatives in case of death of a soldier who was receiving financial assistance under 1915 Act (s4)
  • members of NZ Nursing Service also eligible (s8)

1920 – 11 November
Finance Act 1920

  • Minister of Finance may guarantee loans made by banks to discharged soldiers (s24)

Further amendment Acts:

  • Discharged Soldiers Settlement Amendment Act 1921
  • Discharged Soldiers Settlement Amendment Act 1923
  • Discharged Soldiers Settlement Amendment Act 1924
  • Discharged Soldiers Settlement Loans Act 1919
  • Discharged Soldiers Settlement Loans Act 1920

 

Recruiting and military organisation

General recruiting

Date

Rule

24 December 1909

Defence Act 1909
Structure of Defence Forces:

  • Council of Defence and Inspector-General of Defence Forces (CoD disbanded in favour of a Commandant in November 1910)
  • Permanent Force
  • Territorial Force
  • Militia

Compulsory training scheme:

  • Junior Cadets 12-14 years (or until leaving primary school)
  • Senior Cadets 14-18 years (or until leaving secondary school)
  • General Training Section 18-21 years (18-25 years from November 1910)
  • Reserve 21-30 years (25-30 years from November 1910)

6 August 1914

Applications from volunteers to be prioritised:

  • members of the Permanent Force (Staff Corps and Royal NZ Artillery)
  • territorials now serving, over 20 years of age
  • the territorial reserve
  • if those groups don’t provide enough men, volunteers aged between 20 and 35 with military experience will be considered
  • no-one under 20 years, shorter than 5ft 4in, or heavier than 12st will be accepted

February 1915

Enlistment advertising aimed at volunteers aged between 20 and 40

1 October 1915

National Register to be made of men aged between 17 and 60

11 October 1915

Expeditionary Force Act retrospectively authorises the raising of the NZEF, with members to serve for the duration of the war and 6 months following

15 November 1915

No male over 18 years can leave NZ without a permit from Internal Affairs issued for one month (doesn’t apply to enemy aliens, non-British subjects, men in the army, or seamen)

11 February 1916

Minister of Defence may approve a badge to be worn by men who have enlisted or enrolled for active service, have been honourably discharged, or who are exempted from military service – badges authorised 28 August 1916

24 July 1916

No man over 18 years can leave NZ as crew of  a vessel unless they’ve been discharged from the armed forces or have a permit to leave

1 August 1916

Military Service Act created an Expeditionary Force Reserve

  • to include every man aged between 20 and 46, except current and discharged members of NZEF, men in prison or of unsound mind, and Maori (until 26 June 1917)
  • First Division to include unmarried men, men who married after 1 May 1915 (except those with children over 16 years from a prior marriage), widowers with no children under 16, divorced or separated men with no children under 16
  • Second Division to include all other men
  • men have to enrol when enrolment of the reserve is proclaimed, and a register of names prepared
  • enemy aliens and medically unfit men may be discharged from reserve
  • men can be balloted for military service with the NZEF

21 August 1916

Military authorities can post military service notices in any public or private place, and can order them projected by lantern slide in theatres and cinemas

21 August 1916

Age at which men are prohibited from leaving NZ dropped from 18 to 15 years, and no man can land in NZ with a passport more than two years old

1-2 September 1916

The enrolment of the First and Second Divisions of NZEF reserve proclaimed, with men ordered to enrol before 15 September (1st Division) or 16 September (2nd Division)

18 September 1916

  • compulsory recruits had to answer questions put to them
  • voluntary recruits may state a preference about which reinforcement draft they join, while compulsory recruits may not

15 November 1916

First ballot of the First Division of Reserve

28 February 1917

  • men over 15 years landing in NZ have to state their name, occupation, age, country of birth and residence, whether British or of British parentage, whether they intend to stay in NZ and their purpose in visiting
  • anyone not planning to become a permanent resident may only stay 3 months

24 April 1917

Religious objectors must carry out such non-combatant work as the government decides

18 June 1917

Home Service Branch established for the employment of C1 and C2 reservists

26 June 1917

Henceforth Maori liable to be called up under the Military Service Act 1916 – Native Expeditionary Force Reserve created

4 July 1917

2nd Division of Reservists divided into:
A. no children
B. one child
C. two children
D. three children
E. four children
F. more than four children

8 June 1917

From 23 June 1917, voluntary enrolment of reservists over 21 years in the First Division of Reserve shall cease

4 July 1917

Reservists in the 2nd Division to provide a statement giving the number of their children within 10 days of 11 July 1917

17 September 1917

All classes of the Second Division of the Reserve directed to enrol

6 November 1917

First ballot of class A of the Second Division of Reserve (men with no children)

22 December 1917

Military authorities may arrest any visitor from another allied country which has compulsory military service and send them back there

6 February 1918

The enrolment of the First Division of the Native Expeditionary Force Reserve proclaimed

13 April 1918

First ballot of class B of the Second Division of Reserve (men with one child)

30 April 1918

First ballot of the Native Expeditionary Force Reserve

9 July 1918

Constables can demand to see a certificate of enrolment, discharge, or leave from any man of military age, and any man who doesn’t produce them can be arrested for 48 hours to assess whether they should be charged with an offence under the Military Service Act

9 May 1919

First Military Defaulters’ List published

15 July 1919

First ballot of class C of the Second Division of Reserve (men with two children)

7 August 1919

Members of NZEF discharged (except officers, NCOs, men who have served overseas, men employed on home service, and men on defaulter list)

11 August 1919

Expeditionary Force Reserve abolished

1909 – 24 December
Defence Act 1909
General powers of the Governor

  • ‘“Defence Forces” or “Forces” means all officers, non-commissioned officers, and men in the Permanent Force, the Territorial Force, and Reserve; and includes any rifle club, and any volunteer body enrolled in the Forces under the authority of the Governor for special service within or beyond New Zealand’ (s2)
  • Governor can divide New Zealand into military districts, and make regulations fixing the number of men in the Permanent Force and their qualifications; the enrolment, training etc of the forces; punishments; the regulation of artillery and rifle practice and control over the grounds where they take place; the granting of service awards and certificates of efficiency; fixing an age limit for when officers and men will cease to serve in the Defence Forces; the establishment and conduct of canteens in camps; prescribing the mode and subjects of examinations; and anything else necessary to bring this Act into effect (s3-4)
  • Governor to be Commander in Chief and may appoint officers of the Defence Forces, including a Commandant of the Defence Forces, District Commanding Officers, officers to inspect the Forces; officers and NCOs from the Imperial Forces may be engaged for up to 5 years (s5)
  • Governor may divide or disband any portion of the Forces (s6)
  • no person shall be a member of the Forces unless he is a British subject by birth or naturalisation (s7)
  • Officers of the Permanent Staff and Permanent Force shall outrank officers of other branches of the Forces (s8)
  • oath of allegiance (s11)

Council of Defence and Inspector-General of Defence Forces

  • Council of Defence constituted comprising politicians and Defence people, along with an Inspector-General to review and report on the state of the Forces to the Council (s12-13) – Council of Defence replaced by Commandant on 2 November 1910 (s3 of the Defence Amendment Act 1910)

Part II: Permanent Force

  • members of Permanent Force shall serve for 8 years, to be enrolled in the reserve after 5 years (unless they opt to continue), can be called upon for duty at any time, discharge can be purchased during first 3 years (s15)
  • Permanent Force may assist Police (s17)

Part III: Territorial Force

  • Volunteer Force to become Territorial Force (s20)
  • clauses relating to rules, capitation, property, land for rifle ranges and drill grounds, volunteer drill-sheds and lands, and powers and duties of trustees lifted straight from s56-102 of the Defence Act 1908 (s20)
  • Territorial Force not to serve outside NZ (s22)
  • numbers to be kept up by personnel transfers from the General Training Section (s23)
  • each member of Territorial Force to be classified efficient or non-efficient, with non-efficients liable to more training; efficients under 30 years to be drafted into the Reserve after 3 years (s25)
  • members of Territorial Army can volunteer for ‘special service’ outside NZ (s26)

Part IV: Militia

  • all men between 17 and 55 who have lived in NZ for more than 6 months are liable to be trained and serve in militia (with listed exceptions) (s27)
  • militia divided into Class I (unmarried men between 17 and 30), Class II (married men between 17 and 30, and unmarried men between 30 and 40), and Class III (married men between 30 and 55, and unmarried men between 40 and 55) (s27(3))
  • Governor may call out militia for service in wartime – militia deemed to be part of the Defence Force when called out (s28-30)
  • miners’ rights to be protected (s32)

Part V: Liability to serve in time of war

  • Council of Defence may make rules about the use of the Militia in wartime (s33-34)

Part VI: Universal obligation to be trained

  • men who lived in NZ for more than six months to be trained as following: Junior Cadets (12-14 or date of leaving school), Senior Cadets (14-18 or to date of leaving secondary school), General Training Section (18-21 years), and the Reserve (21-30 years) (s35) – General Training Section ages changed to 18-25 years and Reserve to 25-30 years on 2 November 1910 (s6 of the Defence Amendment Act 1910)
  • training of Junior and Senior Cadets (s36-40)
  • Minister of Education may take over the training of Boy Scouts to form part of Junior Cadets (s39) – amended 2 November 1910 (s7 of the Defence Amendment Act 1910)
  • General Training Section will spend 14 days and 12 half days a year in training camp (except the Artillery and Engineer branches) (s41)
  • The Reserve shall have two muster parades each year (s42)
  • Defence Rifle Clubs may be established shall be affiliated to Action and Reserve Forces as local conditions permit, and may train Senior Cadets or General Training Section as appropriate (s44)
  • all persons liable to be trained under this Act shall apply in writing within 3 months (s45)
  • miscellaneous (s46-8)
  • physically unfit people to be exempt from training (S49)

Part VII: Offences

  • those who refuse to be enrolled to be fined £5 and blocked from enrolling as a voter (s50-51)
  • employers can’t prevent training (s52)
  • offences: damage to property, obstructing parades, false information, bringing liquor into camp, inciting desertion, wearing uniform without authority, disclosing defence information, trespassing etc (s53-66)

Part VIII: Courts of Inquiry and Court Martial
Part IX: Military Pensions

  • provisions relating to pensions and allowances to officers and men, widows, relatives

Part X: General provisions

  • Governor may enter into contracts to manufacture or supply ammunition, or purchase ammunition works (s86-87)
  • Governor may set apart land for training, rifle ranges etc (s88)
  • Governor may set regulations regarding the entry of foreign troops and warships into NZ (s89)
  • guns and appointments remain the property of the govt (s90-1)
  • men can be exempted on religious grounds (s92)
  • costs, orders, exemption from tolls and jury service (s93-102)

1910 – 2 November
Defence Amendment Act 1910

  • Council of Defence disbanded in favour of a Commandant (s3)
  • provisions for Court Martial amended (s13)

1912 – 7 November
Defence Amendment Act 1912

  • amended rules for military custody for failing to pay fines under s51 of the 1909 Act, attachment orders, and court martials
  • people may be granted exemption from service in cases of undue personal hardship (s33)
  • many more technical amendments

1913 – 22 December
Regulations for the Military Forces of the Dominion of New Zealand (New Zealand Gazette, 27 January 1914, pp.233-62) (these were in power throughout WW1)
Section I – Organisation

  • all men liable for service in the Military Forces (which includes all officers, NCOs, and men in the Staff Corps, Permanent Staff, the Permanent Force, the Territorial Force, the Reserve, the Rifle Clubs, and the Senior Cadets) (s1 and definitions)
  • officers and soldiers of the NZ Staff Corps (all officers other than those of the Permanent Force duly commissioned or transferred to the NZ Staff Corps under these regulations), Permanent Staff (all warrant and NCOs and engaged for a continuous term of service in the NZ Military Forces other than those on the establishment of the NZ Permanent Force), and Royal NZ Artillery (aka ‘the Permanent Force’) are at all times liable for foreign service; the remainder of the Military Forces (except the Senior Cadets) are liable for service within NZ only (s2 and definitions)
  • the organisation and establishment of the NZ Staff Corps, RNZA, and the Senior Cadets, and the organisation for peace and war of the Territorial Force, including the establishment of units, is laid down in ‘New Zealand Establishments (s3)
  • the government of the Forces is vested in the Crown, and command and administration of the Forces is vested in the Commandant of the Forces (s4)
  • Dominion divided into Auckland, Wellington, Canterbury, and Otago military districts, and are further subdivided into area groups and areas (s5) – revoked and replaced 25 September 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 September 1916, pp.3032-4)

Section II – Duties of Commanders: Confidential reports

  • outlines the responsibilities of officers at various levels

Section III – The staff

  • composition and duties of headquarters staff, the chief of general staff and director of staff duties and training, the quartermaster-general, director of ordnance, director of accounts, judge-advocate-general (s54-72)
  • duties of staff in districts: principal medical officer, brigade-major, staff officer to coast defence commander, adjutant field artillery brigade (s73-78)
  • duties of officers and others concerned with the work in area groups and areas: officer in charge of area group, regimental adjutants, adjutant of field artillery brigade and divisional adjutant of garrison artillery, area sergeants-major, and quartermaster-sergeants (s79-83)

Section IV – Appointment, Promotion, Retirement, Resignation, and Transfer

  • rules concerning the appointment of officers, the duration of their terms, necessary qualifications etc in the various arms of the NZ Military Force (s88-170)

Section V – Registration, enrolment, and posting

  • people liable for military service are liable to register in the area they reside – application forms available from post offices, police stations, and defence offices – including boys turning 14, men returning to NZ, immigrants arriving in NZ, and all others liable (s171)
  • clergymen or Justices of the Peace can certify that people are obviously physically or mentally unfit for service (s172)
  • record-books to be kept locally (s173)
  • officers of NZMC can allow or disallow exemptions (s174-175)
  • once registration and medical examinations are completed, record books sent to Officer in Charge of Area Group who will assign registration numbers (s176)
  • remote country areas where training is impracticable can be exempt from the Act (s177)
  • Area Sergeants-Major to investigate applicants with criminal records and determine whether they can be admitted (s179)
  • men posted to companies, where they’ll be issued with arms and equipment – units listed as Infantry Battalions, Mounted Rifle regiments, Field Artillery, Signal Companies, Garrison Artillery, Field Companies of Engineers, Departmental Corps (s180-188)

Section VI – Military law, discipline, courts-martial, courts of inquiry, and boards

  • ‘military law’ governs the soldier’s activities in peace and war, Army Act, Rules of Procedure, and King’s Regulations to be used as a guide for matters not dealt with specifically in the 1909 Act and its regulations (s189-191)
  • general and specific instructions about discipline including punishments (s192-240)

Section VII – Training and education

  • all training to be carried out in strict accordance with the Imperial Training Manuals and Regulations issued by the Army Council for use throughout the empire – training to be distributed as evenly as possible throughout the war (s241-242)
  • units listed: Infantry, Mounted Rifles, Field Artillery, Engineers, Garrison Artillery, Signal Troops and Companies, Medical Corps (s242)
  • with permission, an officer or soldier may carry out drills (musketry or training in camp) with another unit, or even one in the UK while visiting (s243-244)
  • obligatory training of Territorial Force: 30 drills (20 of them outdoor parades); twelve half day or six whole day parades in the field, except the Garrison Artillery units which will be exercised at the works of defence to which they will be allotted on mobilisation; 7 days annual training in camp; and a prescribed course of musketry (more detail) (s247)
  • obligatory training of Reserve: two half-day parades with a Territorial unit or company (s248)
  • obligatory training of Senior Cadets: fifty drills of one hour’s duration or 34 drills of one and a half hours’ duration; six half-day parades; prescribed course of musketry – record-keeping, promotion (s249-253)
  • drill: one and a half hours’ instruction, training of an elemental character, consisting of individual or company training in the Infantry and the corresponding training in the other arms; should be distributed throughout the year and culminate in an annual camp; attendance at war games, church parades, funerals, guards of honour, or street duty will not count as obligatory training (s254-257)
  • whole or half day parades: half-day is not less than 3 hours continuous instruction in the open and during daylight, six hours for a full day (s258)
  • annual training in camp: where they should be held, when, etc (s259-270)
  • inspection: to be held in the field, for administration, and for special subjects, and reported on (more detail) (s271-280)
  • musketry: instruction to be carried on in accordance with the Musketry Regulations (s281-288)
  • ammunition: soldiers of Territorial force not permitted to carry ammunition or load their guns with it when not permitted – should be kept at the range (s289-298)
  • training in special sections: machine gun sections, scouts, sanitation and police, signallers, Field Ambulance Duties, staff tours, brigade and regimental tours (s299-311)
  • officers’ training courses (s314-325)
  • qualifications for officers’ promotion (s326-349)

Section VIII – General duties and miscellaneous

  • responsibility for public money and stores (s350-355)
  • garrison and regimental duties – roster of duties, daily duties in camp, guards and picquets, examination of arms and pouches when ammunition is issued, employment of officers and men in various regimental positions (s356-389)
  • medical and hospital duties in camp (s390-395)
  • messes, exemptions from jury service, bands (s396-408)
  • veterinary duties, transport, horses, forage etc (s409-434)
  • chaplains for divine service (s435-440)
  • leave of absence (s443-450)

Section IX – Movements and travelling

  • general instructions (s451-460)
  • movements of troops by railway (s461-477)
  • transport of baggage and stores to annual camps (s476-477)

Section X – Uniforms, equipment, decorations, and medals

  • outlines the uniforms the different ranks wear, including identity disks, equipment, and medals

Section XI – Ceremonial

  • outlines the orders of precedence on ceremonial occasions, honours and salutes, official visits, guards of honour, flats, salutes, military funerals, compliments by guards (s509-571)

Section XII – Correspondence, forms, books, and stationary

  • outlines reporting lines etc

Section XIII – Rifle Clubs (s602-656)
Section XIV – Senior Cadets (s657-679)
Section XV – The New Zealand Forces Motor Reserve of Officers (s680-692)

Amendments to December 1913 regulations:

  • relating to New Zealand Forces Motor Reserve of Officers amended 30 January 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 February 1915, p.478), 31 May 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 June 1915, pp.2000-1)
  • relating to NZ Dental Corps added 16 February 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 February 1916, pp.573-4)
  • relating to Military Honours and Military Funerals amended 14 December 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 December 1917, pp.4545-6), and 25 March 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 June 1918, p.2125)
  • regulations relating to imprisonment and detention amended 6 March 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 14 March 1918, pp.814-5)
  • regulations relating to enlistment in the Royal New Zealand Artillery amended 17 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 July 1918, p.2695); regulations relating to appointments amended 30 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1919, pp.14-15); regulations of 25 July 1918 and 9 January 1919 revoked and replaced, 21 June 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 June 1919, p.1918); amended 18 July 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1919, p.2441)
  • regulations relating to stores amended 27 September 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 October 1918, pp.3429-30)
  • regulations relating to rifle clubs amended 28 January 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 30 January 1919, pp.224-5)
  • regulations relating to orderlies to the Governor-General, 22 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 February 1919, p.586)
  • regulations relating to discipline amended 4 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 March 1919, p.715)
  • regulations relating to reserve of officers, retirements, and annual training in camps amended 17 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 April 1919, p.1179), 15 September 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 September 1919, p.2995)
  • further amendments: 18 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3580), 11 February 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 February 1920, p.542), 11 March 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 March 1920, pp.887-8), 7 June 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 June 1920, p.1976); 21 July 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 July 1920, pp.2270-1)

1913 – 20 August
Financial Instructions and Allowance Regulations for New Zealand Military Forces under Defence Act 1909

  • technically amended 13 January 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 February 1915, p.477), 12 March 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 March 1915, p.899), 4 June 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 June 1915, p.2002),15 June 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 June 1915, pp.2084-5), 6 December 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 December 1915, p.4000), 24 February 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 March 1916, pp.645-6), 12 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 April 1916, pp.1124-5), 21 October 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 February 1917, pp.467-8); 10 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 December 1918, pp.3922-8); 22 June 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 June 1918, p.2430), NZ Army Pay Dept, 24 January 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 30 January 1919, pp.226-7), 22 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 February 1919, p.568) 3 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 April 1919, p.905-8), 17 October 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 23 October 1919, pp.3200-1), 14 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 November 1919, p.3531), 13 May 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 May 1920, p.1559), 26 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 June 1920, p.1816); 12 July 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 July 1920, p.2166)

1914 – 6 August
‘Terms of enlistment
Order of preference
A circular setting forth the conditions governing applications from volunteers to the defence authorities has been issued. It sets forth that applications will be received in the following order: - (a) The regiment of the R.N.Z.A., the N.Z.S.C., the New Zealand Permanent Staff; (b) territorials now serving, over 20 years of age, including those on the unattached lists (a) and (b); (c) the territorial reserve; (d) failing a sufficient supply of volunteers from these sources, applications from others with previous military experience, between the ages of 20 and 35, will be entertained. Such volunteers must be primarily enlisted into an existing territorial unit. The conditions of the agreement or attestation are for home defence, and, if required, to serve abroad out of New Zealand for the duration of the war, and for such longer period as is required to convey the troops home. No one will be accepted who has not reached the age of 20 years, is under 5ft 4in in height, or who exceeds 12st in weight. In special cases the last two restrictions may be disregarded.’
ref:
New Zealand Herald, 6 August 1914, p.9

1915 – 1 October
National Registration Act 1915, to compile a register of men between the ages of 17 and 60 years.

  • Governor can call for a national register of men between 17 and 60 to be created (s2)
  • register to include name and full address; age, date, place of birth, parents’ places of birth; nationality and country of allegiance; marital status; number of dependants; occupation; physical condition and infirmities; military experience; whether they have volunteered for war service in NZEF, whether they are willing to, or whether they are willing to act in another capacity (s4)
  • Act repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1915 – 11 October
Expeditionary Forces Act 1915, to be read together with and deemed part of the Defence Act 1909 (retrospectively authorises the raising of the NZEF under the Defence Act 1909)

  • Governor can raise an expeditionary force during present war with Germany by voluntary enlistment; officers, NCOs and men of this expeditionary force part of the Defence Forces under the Defence Act 1909 (s3-5)
  • service of all is for the duration of the present war (s5-7) and six months thereafter (s9)
  • all have to take an oath of allegiance (s8) printed on p.306
  • the provisions of this Act to apply to all the Forces already raised since the beginning of the war (s25)
  • present period to be deemed a time of war under the terms of the 1909 Act (s29)
  • provisions relating to pay, payment to dependants, proof of death of person serving overseas (s31-33)

1915 – 12 October
Defence Amendment Act 1915, amending Defence Act 1912

  • provisions of War Pensions Act 1915 apply to any member of the Expeditionary Force or their dependants in the case of death of disablement (s2)
  • governor can authorise the establishment of a National Reserve, ‘established for military training and military service within New Zealand’, through a Gazette notice (s3)
  • Senior Cadets and General Training Section added to the definition of Defence Force under the 1909 Act (s4)

1915 – 15 November
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 November 1915, pp.3813-4) [WRA 1919 pp.40-3]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • no male over the age of 18 years shall leave NZ without a permit issued by Internal Affairs – valid for only one month – doesn’t apply to enemy aliens, non-British subjects, men in the army, or seamen; amended 29 November 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1915, p.3937), 13 December 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 December 1915, p.4031), age reduced to 15 years 21 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2806-7) [WRA 1919 pp.70-2]; 1 October 1917 [WRA 1919 p.119]; a travel bond may be payable (s26 of the War Legislation Act 1917)
  • no person can incite another to break a contract with the Crown relating to the war, to discontinue to serve the Crown, or fail to render service to the Crown
  • no person shall take liquor on board a troop-train

1914 – 20 November
Allen appoints military authorities as per Order in Council of 10 November 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 November 1914, p.4160)

  • A.W. Robin, commandant NZ Forces
  • C.M. Gibbon, chief of general staff
  • H.E. Pilkington, adjutant-general
  • J.C. Nichols, commanding Otago Military District
  • R.W. Tate, commanding Wellington Military District
  • J.E. Hume, commanding Auckland military district

1916 – 11 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 February 1916, pp.493-4)

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Minister of Defence may approve a badge to be worn by men who have enlisted or been enrolled for active service but have not yet been called up; have been honourably discharged; have offered themselves for service but are unsuitable; are engaged in an exempted industry

1916 – 1 March
Regulations for the organisation, training, discipline, and control of the National Reserve under the Defence Amendment Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1916, p.708)

  • National Reserve to consist of all voluntary units throughout NZ
  • sets out organisation, leadership etc
  • ‘All members of the National Reserve already enrolled shall be deemed to have made a military declaration of service, submitting during the continuance of membership, to the conditions of the King’s Regulations’
  • technically amended 24 July 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 July 1916, pp.2492-3)

1916 – 24 July
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1916, pp.2481-5) [WRA 1919 pp.60-4, 68-70]

  • no man over 18 years can leave NZ as crew of a vessel unless they have been discharged from the armed forces or have a permit to leave New Zealand; reduced to 15 years 21 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2806-7) [WRA 1919 pp.70-2]

1916 – 1 August
Military Service Act 1916, to be read together with and deemed part of the Expeditionary Force Act 1916 (creates National Reserve and conscription)
The Expeditionary Force Reserve

  • creates a Expeditionary Force Reserve consisting of every man of military age resident in New Zealand, except current members of the NZEF, men discharged from NZEF for poor health, men in prison for a year or more or of unsound mind, and natives (within the meaning of the Native Land Act 1909 – ie of pure blood, mixed blood/half caste) (s3)
  • Reserve shall have two divisions
  • First Division: unmarried men, men married since 1 May 1915 (except those with children under 16 from a previous marriage), widowers with no children under 16, and legally divorced men with no children under 16;
  • Second Division: all other reservists (s4)
  • governor may proclaim and direct the enrolment of either division (s5)
  • the government statistician shall be directed to prepare a register of such part of these divisions as the governor shall direct, the National Register prepared under the National Registration Act 1915 to be used for this purpose; names shall be struck out when enrolled in the NZEF (s6)
  • men to be discharged from reserve if they or their parents are enemy aliens, or if they are found to be medically unfit; punishment of summary imprisonment for three months or fine of £10 for not a reservist not presenting themselves for medical inspection (s7)

Transfer of Reservists to the Expeditionary Force

  • governor can proclaim the enrolment of any part of the Reserve, ‘to call up […] for service within the Expeditionary Force such number of men as the said Minister [of Defence] thinks necessary’ (s8)
  • men to be selected by lot from the register of the relevant division (or part thereof), to be selected at once or as the Commandant directs (s9)
  • names of balloted men to be published in the Gazette, who can then be transferred from the Reserve to the Expeditionary  Force the day following publication; from that point he is under military command and must report at any time and place the Commandant directs (s10-13)
  • commandant can exempt any man from overseas service found medically unfit, though liable for military service within New Zealand (s14)
  • men deliberately remaining in New Zealand after his unit embarks, or leaving the country without permission, will be guilty of desertion; punishment: hard labour of up to five years (s14)

Appeals

  • men called up for service have right of appeal on the grounds they weren’t enrolled in the reserve (or part of the reserve authorised for balloting), that leaving his occupation would be against the public interest, that his leaving for service would cause undue hardship to himself or others, that as of 4 August 1914 he was a member of a pacifist religious body (s18(1))
  • a Military Service Board shall assess these appeals – composition and procedure (s18(2)-31)

Local Subdivisions of the Reserve

  • local registers of reservists may also be kept in addition to the National Register (s32)

Application for Enrolment in the Reserve

  • reservists to make an application for enrolment in their division of the Reserve within 14 days of its being called up by proclamation in the Gazette (s33-34)

Miscellaneous

  • if two or more brothers from the same family are called up, they can appear before a Military Service Board to show cause why they should be exempted from service (s35)
  • governor-in-council may determine war service of those kept in NZ under 18(c) (s36)
  • NZEF may be divided into new units and divisions (s37)
  • punishments for offences under this Act (s38-39)
  • an offence to employ men who’d been called up or who’d deserted (s40-41)
  • reservists not allowed to change their name or address without informing the authorities (s42-43)
  • police authorised to question any man of military age about whether they were enrolled in the reserve, and anyone who refuses to answer or lies shall be guilty of an offence and dealt with according to law (s44)
  • it was an offence to withhold information about men not on the reservist roll (s45)
  • publication of notices under this Act in the Gazette to be sufficient notice (s46)
  • registered medical practitioners to examine any man for service when asked to do so by an authorised officer (s47)
  • names of men exempted from overseas service to be published in Gazette (s48)
  • men could be transferred from Reserve to New Zealand (Samoan) Expeditionary Force (s49)
  • Governor may extend the Act to calling up natives for service with the Expeditionary Force (s50)
  • Governor can proclaim that voluntary enlistment will cease (s51)
  • it will be an offence for any member of the NZEF to refuse inoculation or medical or dental treatment if such is necessary to render them fit for military service; vaccinations can be carried out without the consent of the individual (s52)
  • Governor can prescribe forms for attestation papers (s53)
  • regulations can be issued under Act (s54)

1916 – 21 August
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2804-5) [WRA 1919 pp.68-70]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • military authorities can supply copies of military service notices to the owner of the owner or occupier of any shop, factory, office, wharf, hotel, or boardinghouse, or any other premises frequented by the public, and they must be displayed in a prominent place for one calendar month
  • military authorities can supply lantern slides displaying military notices to theatres and cinemas to be projected onto screens
  • notices can likewise be displayed on tramway cars, passenger ships, railway stations and rail cars, or on the street
  • anyone who interferes with them is guilty of an offence

1916 – 21 August
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2806-7) [WRA 1919 pp.70-2]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • age at which men prohibited from leaving NZ without permission reduced from 18 years to 15 years
  • from 1 October 1916, no man over 15 years shall arrive in NZ without a passport less than two year old (except those coming from Australia with a permit, or coming from occupied Samoa, a NZ citizen returning to NZ, a member of the NZ or British armed forces, or ship’s crew)
  • enemy aliens arriving as crew on ships must possess a passport, the Customs officer at the port to report any aliens without passports
  • continued by s10 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 28 August
Regulations under Military Service Act 1916 prescribe the forms for enrolment in the reserve under s33 of the Act (New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 1916, pp.2873-4)

  • The forms would be available at post offices and must be personally delivered back to the post office once complete

1916 – 28 August
Additional Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 to encourage recruiting in the Expeditionary Force (New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 1916, pp.2874-5) [WRA 1919 pp.72-3]

  • ‘Whereas it is desirable for the encouragement of recruiting in the Expeditionary Forces raised for service in the present war that a distinctive badge should be issued to and worn by men who have served or offered to serve in the war, or who are for any proper reason exempt from any obligation to serve therein’
  • to take whatever form the Defence Department decrees, it being an offence to wear one without permission

1916 – 29 August
Regulations under the Defence Act 1909 (and its amendments) and the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces Act 1915 concerning the appointment, promotion, and gradation of members of the NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 7 September 1916, pp.2959-63)

  • rules concerning the original gradation list of officers, the gradation of those who subsequently joined the NZEF, the regulations concerning the appointments and striking off of officers, and training units and depots
  • technically amended 26 February 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 March 1917, pp.868-9) and 6 September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 September 1917, p.3544)

1916 – 1 September
Proclamation under the Military Service Act 1916, directing the enrolment of the reserve (New Zealand Gazette, 1 September 1916, p.2931)

  • Governor directs the First Division of the Expeditionary Force Reserve be enrolled

1916 – 2 September
Proclamation under the Military Service Act 1916, directing the enrolment of the reserve (New Zealand Gazette, 2 September 1916, p.2933)

  • Governor directs the Second Division of the Expeditionary Force Reserve be enrolled
  • amended 17 September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 September 1917, p.3609); enrolment of all classes of the Second Division directed

1916 – September
New Zealand Gazette,  7 September 1916, p.2986 (see also p.3025)
‘Military Service Act, 1916
Enrolment of Expeditionary Force Reserve.
By proclamation dated respectively 1st and 2nd September, 1916, the enrolment of the Reserve is directed. Enrolment MUST be made not later than 15th September (First Division) or 16th September (Second Division).
The reserve consists of men not less than twenty and under forty-six years of age.
The Reserve Register is based on the National Register.
Men not already registered must supply enrolment-cards not later than 16th September.
Men already registered need not supply an enrolment-card, but must, not later than 16th September, notify present address if place of abode has changed since registration.
Men reaching military age, or arriving in Dominion after 16th September, must supply enrolment-cards within fourteen days thereafter.
Changes of abode after enrolment must be notified within fourteen days.
The Act makes the Reservist’s obligation to do any of the above things a personal one, and he is not relieved by information previously given to recruiting officer or committee.
Men not enrolled may be sent straight to camp.
Men who fail to notify change of address may become liable on charge of desertion.
Employers of Reservists not enrolled, or of deserters, are liable to heavy fines or imprisonment.
For protection of Reservists certificates of enrolment will be issued as soon as practicable after receipt of application on form provided.
Call at nearest post-office for forms, information, and assistance.
Onus of proof in every case is on the defendant.
Malcolm Fraser
Government Statistician’

1916 – 18 September
Regulations under Military Service Act 1916 about swearing the oath of allegiance (New Zealand Gazette, 18 September 1916, pp.3029-32

  • volunteers had to take the oath (as per s8 of the Expeditionary Forces Act 1915) in the presence of an attesting officer as per Form 1
  • compulsory recruits had to be attested with Form 2 (or Form 1 if they preferred)
  • any compulsory recruit who refused to answer the questions put to him in the form will be guilty of disobedience
  • voluntary recruits can state a preference as to which reinforcement draft he prefers to be attached to, while a compulsory recruit may not
  • amended 17 September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 September 1917, pp.3610-2)

1916 – 18 September
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914, appointing military authorities (New Zealand Gazette, 21 September 1916, p.3066)

  • revokes military authorities gazetted on 26 November 1914
  • appoints Robin commandant of NZ Military Forces, C.M. Gibbon chief of General Staff, J.C. Nichols commanding Otago Military District, R.A. Chaffey commanding Canterbury Military District, G.W.S. Patterson commanding Auckland Military District, J.E. Hume commanding Wellington Military District

1916 – 25 September
Regulations under the Defence Act 1909 constituting Military Districts, Groups, and areas (New Zealand Gazette, 18 September 1916, pp.3032-34)

  • these regulations to come into force on 25 September 1916
  • Defence Act 1909 divides New Zealand into four military districts
  • each district is hereby divided into 21 groups with boundaries laid out in schedules
  • Clause 5 of the Regulations for the Military Forces of New Zealand, made 22 December 1913 and gazetted 23 January 1914, revoked, and the military districts therein abolished
  • amended 17 September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 September 1917, p.3613); the voluntary enlistment of reservists of the First Division has ceased, and by reason of the classification system of the Second Division it’s thought advisable to have a single register for the whole country rather than district registers

1916 – 26 September
Regulations under Military Service Act 1916 concerning registers of reservists (New Zealand Gazette, 2 November 1916, pp.3491-2)

  • the enrolment of the First Division of reservists was proclaimed on 1 September 1916, and the Second Division on 2 September 1916
  • the Minister of Defence divided the country into 21 recruiting districts on 25 September 1916
  • directs that registers be created for each of these districts, comprised of index cards kept in alphabetical order – the cards collected under the National Registration Act 1915 or – where they don’t exist – under the forms gazetted under the Military Service Act on 28 August 1916
  • each drawer to contain 500 cards, marked with recruiting district’s distinctive number
  • new drawers created to accommodate cards that come later
  • technically amended after the abolition of the district recruiting system on 1 October 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 October 1917, pp.3708-10)

1916 – 10 October
Regulations under Military Service Act 1916 concerning appeals to Military Service Boards (New Zealand Gazette, 10 October 1916, pp.3207-11)

  • at appeal hearings, Crown and appellant may be both be represented by Counsel
  • evidence and witnesses can be produced, and witnesses cross-examined
  • more specifics and forms

1916 – 1 November
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916 concerning the selection by lot of reservists (New Zealand Gazette, 2 November 1916, pp.3493-4)

  • there will be two drums of numbered marbles, distinguished as the drawer drum and the card drum; the numbers will be recorded in the order they were removed, which will correspond to particular cards in particular drawers
  • these regulations technically amended on 9 January 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1917, p.4), and 1 October 1917 after the abolition of recruiting districts (New Zealand Gazette, 1 October 1917, pp.3708-10)

1916 – 1 November
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916 concerning medical examination (New Zealand Gazette, 2 November 1916, pp.3495-6)

  • the Minister of Defence will create Medical Boards, consisting of officers of the NZ Medical Corps, to examine reservists called up for service in NZEF
  • when a reservist is called up, they’ll be told where their medical inspection will take place, which will be at or near the headquarters in the military district where they live
  • Medical Boards to report on each man’s classification
  • no man to be discharged as medically unfit from the NZEF until inspected by a Medical Board
  • voluntary recruits can be inspected prior to enlistment by either a Medical Officer or a Medical Board
  • these regulations technically amended on 17 September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 September 1917, pp.3612-3)

1916 – 4 December
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1916, pp.3751-3) [WRA 1919 pp.83-6]

  • no person to encourage any offence prejudicial to public safety, create hostility between the classes, interfere with training or recruiting, interfere with the manufacture or transport of goods required for the war, to prejudice relations with foreign nations or discourage victory in the present war, to encourage resistance to compulsory military service in the war, to interfere with the administration of criminal prosecutions, to refuse service to the Crown or encourage others to refuse, to excite disloyalty

1917 – 16 January
Regulations under the War Regulation Act 1914 concerning exemptions from military service because of work (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1917, pp.164-5)

  • men exempted from military service because of their occupation must notify the Commandant of the Defence Forces when they change job or address

1917 – 24 January
Warrant under Military Service Act 1916, constituting new Military Service Boards and appointing members thereof.

1917 – 26 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 26 February 1917, pp.777-8) [WRA 1919 pp.99-100]

  • men over 15 years landing in NZ have to fill in a form stating their name, occupation, age, country of birth/residence, whether British or of British parentage, whether they want to stay in NZ and when they plan to leave, what their purpose is in visiting
  • people returning from Australia, tourists with return tickets, ships’ crews exempted
  • anyone not intending to become a permanent resident must stay no longer than 3 months
  • terms of declaration varied, 4 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 November 1918, p.3691) – Undesirable Immigrants Exclusion Act 1919 allows regulations 1 and 2 to be revoked, 18 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, pp.3789-90)
  • Undesirable Immigrants Exclusion Act 1919 allows this regulation to be revoked, 18 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, pp.3789-90)

1917 – 24 April
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916 concerning non-combatant service for religious objectors (New Zealand Gazette, 24 April 1917, p.1399)

  • ‘religious objector’ means a reservist who has been exempted from military service by a Military Service Board under s18(e) of the Military Service Act 1916
  • religious objectors to carry out such non-combatant work as the executive government decides, at the same rate of pay as a NZEF soldier, and will be entitled to such lodging and rations as soldiers, but won’t have to wear uniform

1917 – 18 June
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916, concerning the Home Service Branch, NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 18 June 1917, pp.2445-6)

  • reservists called up for military service and voluntary recruits alike are attested into the NZEF for general service, and all certified medically fit for service (A, B, B1, and B2) shall be ‘posted to the Foreign Service Branch’, while those classified permanently unfit for foreign service but suitable for service in New Zealand (C1 and C2) shall be posted to Home Service Branch – men can be swapped between the two groups according to the findings of a Medical Board
  • soldiers of the Home Service Branch will work under the same conditions as soldiers of the Foreign Service Branch
  • those not immediately required will be put on leave without pay
  • until Minister of Defence decides otherwise, soldiers of the Home Service Branch will be called up only from those who volunteer for home service
  • provisional organisation and establishment outlined
  • Home Service Branch to wear a special uniform
  • technically amended 9 July 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 July 1917, p.2764)
  • regulations of 18 June 1917 revoked and replaced on 20 August 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 August 1918, p.3082)

1917 – 4 July
Military Service Act 1916, classification of Second Division of the NZEF Reserve (New Zealand Gazette, 4 July 1917, pp.2697-8) [WRA 1919 pp.111-2]

  • Second Division divided into six classes, (A) no children, (B) one child, (C) two children, (D) three children, (E) four children, (F) more than four children
  • ‘child’ is irrespective of age, includes children legally adopted or step-children where reservist married the mother before 1 May 1915, illegitimate children count only if the reservist married the mother before 1 May 1915
  • if a son of a reservist dies in service then he will be computed as a living child
  • amended 3 September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 September 1917, pp.3501-2) relating to deserted children

1917 – 8 June
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916, concerning the voluntary enlistment of reservists (New Zealand Gazette, 18 June 1917, p.2429)

  • from 23 June 1917, voluntary enlistment of reservists over 21 years old and belonging to the First Division of Reserve shall cease

1917 – 25 June
Regulations under the Expeditionary Forces Act 1915 concerning paying soldiers discharged as medically unfit from training camps (New Zealand Gazette, 25 June 1917, pp.2511-2)

  • in cases where men are discharged from NZEF training camps because they’re medically unfit for overseas service, they would henceforth be granted leave with pay until discharged
  • the War Pensions Board constituted a commission of inquiry to look into these cases

1917 – 4 July
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916, concerning returns required from reservists of the Second Division (New Zealand Gazette, 4 July 1917, p.2698)

  • reservists of the Second Division to supply to a postal officer or post office a statement of the number of his children, their dates and places of birth, as of 11 July 1917 – within 10 days of that date
  • this doesn’t apply to those who registered under the National Registration Act 1915 or the Military Service Act 1916

1917 – 25 May
Regulations under the Defence Act 1909, concerning the equipment of the New Zealand Military Forces (New Zealand Gazette, 14 June 1917, pp.2369-2428)

  • detailed summary of gear issued to all the different parts of the NZEF

1917 – 17 September
Proclamation under Military Service Act 1916, directing that all classes of the Second Division of the Expeditionary Force Reserve be enrolled

1917 – 29 September
Military Service Amendment Act 1917, relating to the selection of men for the NZEF, to be read with and deemed part of the Military Service Act 1916 (passed 29 September 1917).

  • if the number of reservists in a particular balloted group is less than that prescribed by the Gazette notice, then all the reservists in that group will be deemed selected

1917 – 1 October
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916, concerning the keeping of reservist registers and selection of reservists by lot since the abolition of the recruiting district system for the Second Division of Reserve in September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 October 1917, pp.3708-10)

1917 – 17 December
Exemption from military service granted to persons residing in certain areas (as granted in New Zealand Gazette, 27 July 1911), revoked

1917 – 22 December
Additional war regulations (New Zealand Gazette, 22 December 1917, p.4618) [WRA 1919 pp.137-8]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • military authorities may arrest any visitor from another allied country which has compulsory military service, and send them back there
  • military authorities may search any building or ship where evidence of offences against the war regulations might be found
  • it’s illegal to use invisible ink

1918 – 26 March
Police gaol established at Wanganui on 5 March 1916; declared a military detention barrack (New Zealand Gazette, 28 March 1918, p.928)

1918 – 9 July
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 12 July 1918, p.2604) [WRA 1919 pp.159-60]

  • constables can demand to see a certificate of enrolment, discharge, or leave from any man of military age
  • any person who doesn’t produce these papers can be detained in custody by the constable for no more than 48 hours, as may be required to ascertain whether there are reasonable grounds for charging him with an offence under the Military Service Act 1916

1918 – 19 September
Military Service Act 1916 – abolishing certain Military Service Boards and revoking appointments of members thereof (New Zealand Gazette, 19 September 1918, p.3343)

  • various military service boards constituted and established by warrant 24 January 1917
  • services of Third Wellington and Second Otago military service boards no longer required and hereby abolished
  • various other military service boards disestablished 10 January 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1919, pp.96-7)

1919 – 21 January
Amending regulations governing the disposal of officers, warrant officers, and non-commissioned officers invalided from the NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 30 January 1919, p.225)

  • amends regulations published in the gazette on 8 March 1917

1919 – 7 August
Discharge of men of the NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 13 August 1919, p.2610)

  • all members of the NZEF discharged, except officers and non-coms, men who have served overseas, men employed on home service, and men on the defaulters’ list

1919 – 11 August
Expeditionary Force Reserve abolished (New Zealand Gazette, 13 August 1919, p.2609)

  • by reason of the termination of hostilities the further continuance of the Reserve is no longer necessary

1919 – 18 September
Scale of bonus of soldiers of the NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 26 September 1919, p.3031)

  • bonus may be issued to men honourably discharged under s7 of the Expeditionary Forces Amendment Act 1918
  • a bonus of one shilling and sixpence per day authorised

1919 – 31 October
Discharge of men of the NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 20 November 1919, p.3548)

  • as per s14 of the Expeditionary Forces Act 1915, all members of the NZEF discharged after service abroad but who re-enlisted without going overseas again, and all members employed on home service, discharged from service

1920 – 16 March
No. 9 (Christchurch) and No. 11 (North Canterbury) military districts merged (New Zealand Gazette, 25 March 1920, p.951)

1921 – 10 February
Regulations under the Defence Act 1909 constituting military districts (New Zealand Gazette, 10 February 1921, p.423)

  • country divided into Northern, Central, and Southern military districts

Maori recruiting and conscription

1914 – 4 September
Expeditionary Forces Voting Act 1914

  • members of NZEF entitled to vote in the next general election and licensing poll – how it’s to be done
  • Expeditionary Forces Voting (No. 2) Act 1914 (5 November 1914) extends the entitlement to Maori members of NZEF voting in Maori electoral districts (No. 2 Act repealed by the third schedule of the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919)
  • original Act repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1915 – 23 August
Regulations under the War Pensions Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 August 1915, p.3028)

  • wives of Maori soldiers married ‘by Native custom’ have to provide the name of a judge etc who can certify that
  • Maori land owned taken into consideration for assessing pension payments

1917 – 2 April
Maori Soldiers’ Fund Trustees incorporated under the War Funds Act 1915, 2 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1917, p.1187)

1917 – 26 June
Proclamation under the Military Service Act 1916, concerning the extension of the Act to Natives (New Zealand Gazette, 26 June 1917, pp.2509-10)

  • henceforth Natives would be liable to calling-up for military service under s50 of the Military Services Act 1916
  • consequently a separate reserve is established called the Native Expeditionary Force Reserve
  • no past or future gazette notice applying to the Expeditionary Force Reserve shall apply to the Native Expeditionary Force Reserve unless explicitly stated
  • amended 23 July 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1917, p.2963) so that any Native married on or before 1 May 1915 shall be a member of the Second Division of the Native Expeditionary Force Reserve

1917 – 2 July
Proclamation under Military Service Act 1916, constituting Native Recruiting Districts (New Zealand Gazette, 2 July 1917, pp.2321-2)

  • the provisions of the Military Service Act 1916 extended by Proclamation on 26 June 1917 to provide for the compulsory calling-up of Natives for military service
  • the country is therefore divided into seven recruiting districts (listed)

1918 – 6 February
Proclamation under Military Service Act 1916, proclaiming the enrolment of the First Division of the Native Expeditionary Force Reserve (as per the proclamation of 26 June 1917) (New Zealand Gazette, 6 February 1918, p.385)

1918 – 11 February
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916, concerning the selection by lot of native reservists (New Zealand Gazette, 14 February 1918, pp.533-4)

  • card index to be kept for each native recruiting district, and selected by lot as per the Order in Council of 1 October 1917

1918 – 27 April
A Native Military Service Board constituted under s17 of the Military Service Act 1916. Chairman: Chief Judge of NLC C.E. MacCormick, John Ormsby, and Pitiera Taipua (New Zealand Gazette, 29 April 1918, p.1271)

Home Service Branch

1917 – 18 June
Regulations under the Military Service Act 1916, concerning the Home Service Branch, NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 18 June 1917, pp.2445-6)

  • reservists called up for military service and voluntary recruits alike are attested into the NZEF for general service, and all certified medically fit for service (A, B, B1, and B2) shall be ‘posted to the Foreign Service Branch’, while those classified permanently unfit for foreign service but suitable for service in New Zealand (C1 and C2) shall be posted to Home Service Branch – men can be swapped between the two groups according to the findings of a Medical Board
  • soldiers of the Home Service Branch will work under the same conditions as soldiers of the Foreign Service Branch
  • those not immediately required will be put on leave without pay
  • until Minister of Defence decides otherwise, soldiers of the Home Service Branch will be called up only from those who volunteer for home service
  • provisional organisation and establishment outlined
  • Home Service Branch to wear a special uniform
  • technically amended 9 July 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 July 1917, p.2764)
  • regulations of 18 June 1917 revoked and replaced on 20 August 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 August 1918, p.3082)

Calling up notices for First Division of NZEF Reserve

Date of ballot

Gazette reference

15 November 1916

23 November 1916, pp.3663-93

11 December 1916

14 December 1916, pp.3855-78

8 January 1917

12 January 1917, pp.135-62

5 February 1917

13 February 1917, pp.541-93

5 March 1917

13 March 1917, pp.909-43

10 April 1917

17 April 1917, pp.1251-90

30 April 1917

8 May 1917, pp.1905-70

28 May 1917

6 June 1917, pp.2213-79

25 June 1917

4 July 1917, pp.2633-96

20 August 1917

3 September 1917, pp.3383-3500

24 September 1917

2 October 1917, pp.3713-80

26 October 1917

6 November 1917, pp.4083-95

21 November 1917

4 December 1917, pp.4391-7

18 December 1917

15 January 1918, pp.103-10

14 February 1918

19 February 1918, pp.537-45

19 March 1918

26 March 1918, pp.903-8

13 April 1918

25 April 1918, pp.1143-8

12 May 1918

21 May 1918, pp.1877-82

5 June 1918

19 June 1918, pp.2213-17

15 July 1918

24 July 1918, pp.2633-8

12 August 1918

21 August 1918, pp.2961-6

9 September 1918

18 September 1918, pp.3263-8

10 October 1918

16 October 1918, pp.3513-8

Calling up notices for Second Division of NZEF Reserve

Lists of balloted men from Class A:


Date of ballot

Gazette reference

26 October 1917

6 November 1917, pp.4095-134

21 November 1917

4 December 1917, pp.4398-437

18 December 1917

15 January 1917, pp.111-42

14 February 1918

19 February 1918, pp.546-51

19 March 1918

26 March 1918, pp.909-912

13 April 1918

25 April 1918, p.1149

12 May 1918

21 May 1918, p.1883

5 June 1918

19 June 1918, p.2218

15 July 1918

24 July 1918, p.2639

12 August 1918

21 August 1918, p.2967

9 September 1918

18 September 1918, p.3269

10 October 1918

16 October 1918, p.3519

Lists of balloted men from Class B:


Date of ballot

Gazette reference

13 April 1918

25 April 1918, pp.1150-1230

12 May 1918

21 May 1918, pp.1884-1948

5 June 1918

19 June 1918, pp.2219-2304

15 July 1918

24 July 1918, p.2640

12 August 1918

21 August 1918, p.2968

9 September 1918

18 September 1918, p.3270

10 October 1918

16 October 1918, p.3519

Lists of balloted men from Class C:


Date of ballot

Gazette reference

15 July 1918

24 July 1918, pp.2641-86

12 August 1918

21 August 1918, pp.2969-3012

9 September 1918

18 September 1918, pp.3271-3305

10 October 1918

16 October 1918, p.3520

Calling up notices for Native Expeditionary Force Reserve

Lists of balloted men:


Date of ballot

Gazette reference

30 April 1918

6 May 1918, pp.1753-4

10 June 1918

25 June 1918, pp.2409-11

16 July 1918

6 August 1918, p.2807

10 September 1918

24 September 1918, p.3345

Orders to parade under Military Service Act 1916

Date of notice

Gazette reference

21 February 1917 (Archie Baxter p.767)

23 February 1917, pp.765-9

27 February 1917

27 February 1917, pp.773-6

9 March 1917

12 March 1917, pp.903-8

16 April 1917

26 April 1917, pp.1437-44

9 May 1917

14 May 1917, pp.2035-42

19 June 1917

2 July 1917, pp.2623-32

8 October 1917

15 October 1917, pp.3917-24

8 November 1917

13 November 1917, pp.4219-24

5 December 1917

11 December 1917, pp.4471-6

14 December 1917 (seamen)

8 January 1918, pp.3-5

29 January 1918

13 February 1918, pp.477-83

22 March 1918

22 March 1918, pp.893-4

23 March 1918

23 March 1918, pp.897-902

7 May 1918 (Maori)

7 May 1918, pp.1757-60

19 April 1918 (seamen)

15 May 1918, pp.1829-30

19 April 1918

15 May 1918, pp.1831-8

24 June 1918 (Maori)

1 July 1918, pp.2479-81

24 July 1918

26 August 1918, pp.3057-63

24 July 1918 (seamen)

26 August 1918, pp.3065-6

Defaulters

1919 – 14 January
Military defaulters list – regulations as to appeals (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1919, pp.123-4)

  • men included in the Military Defaulters’ List in the Gazettes have three months to appeal their inclusion

1919 – 9 May
Military Defaulters’ List – under Expeditionary Forces Amendment Act 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 14 May 1919, p.1343)
Men listed in Military Defaulters’ Lists are deprived of civil rights for ten years from 10 December 1918, meaning they:

  • can’t be employed by the Crown or local authority
  • can’t hold office at national or local level
  • can’t vote
  • if they were out of NZ on 10 December 1918, they can’t return for 10 years
  • they can’t change their name for 10 years
  • any defaulter who breaks these provisions is liable to imprisonment for 12 m0onths

1919 – 7 August
Discharge of men of the NZEF (New Zealand Gazette, 13 August 1919, p.2610)

  • all members of the NZEF discharged, except officers and non-coms, men who have served overseas, men employed on home service, and men on the defaulters’ list

Date of list

Gazette reference

9 May 1919 (main list)

14 May 1919, pp.1343-62

3 July 1919 (additions)

3 July 1919, p.2081

29 July 1919 (additions and deletions)

30 July 1919, p.2473

30 August 1919 (additions and deletions)

2 September 1919, p.2767

6 October 1919 (additions and deletions)

15 October 1919, p.3131

27 November 1919 (additions and deletions)

27 November 1919, p.3603

12 August 1920 (additions and deletions)

18 August 1920, p.2477

21 April 1921 (deletion)

28 April 1921, p.1037

16 September 1922 (addition and deletion)

21 September 1922, p.2631

25 September 1922 (deletion)

28 September 1922, p.2667

27 May 1924 (deletion)

29 May 1924, p.1316

14 October 1925 (deletion)

22 October 1925, p.3026

Navy

1914 – 27 July
Regulations under Naval Defence Act 1913, prescribing matters requiring to be prescribed under the Act (New Zealand Gazette, 30 July 1914, p.2919)

  • examinations under s5 of the Act, the conditions of appointment to active service, the ages of compulsory retirement, the period of enlistment, to be those laid down by the King’s Regulations and Admiralty Instructions

1914 – 27 July
Regulations under Naval Defence Act 1913, re discipline of and uniforms to be worn by officers and men of New Zealand Naval Forces (New Zealand Gazette, 30 July 1914, pp.2919-20

1914 – 3 August
Reserve Naval Volunteers called into actual service (New Zealand Gazette, 3 August 1914, p.3035)

1914 – 20 August
Regulations under Naval Defence Act 1913, concerning rates of pay, allowances etc for officers

1914 – 3 August
Declaring H.M.S. Philomel and New Zealand Naval Forces to pass under the control of Great Britain (New Zealand Gazette, 3 August 1914, pp.3035-6)

1917 – 3 September
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 3 September 1917, p.3502) [WRA 1919 pp.118-9]

  • all references to military authorities in any regulations issued under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments will be deemed to also refer to naval officers

Military hospitals

1915 – 12 October
Appropriation Act 1915

  • authorises the use of funds from the hospital ship fund for comforts to be supplied to soldiers, the equipment of a hospital at Walton on Thames or any stationary or base hospital (s25)
  • s25 repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1918 – 18 December
Defence Act 1909 – additional regulations as to the discipline of the Defence Forces (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1919, pp.15-16)

  • no soldier undergoing medical treatment consume liquor or bring it into a hospital without permission of the officer in charge
  • soldiers undergoing medical treatment shall be guilty of an offence if they go AWOL, neglect orders, attend any political meeting in uniform, accept payment for civil employment before discharge, appear improperly dressed in public, behaves in an inappropriate or unsoldierly manner, fails to report venereal disease, disobeys the rules of the rules of the hospital, is in possession of liquor on a train or gets intoxicated, disobeys commands, is guilty of misconduct which aggravates medical problems
  • Commanding Officers can summarily fine offenders £2 to be deducted from pay
  • amended 22 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 March 1919, pp.857-8)

1919 – 14 June
Military hospital declared (New Zealand Gazette, 19 June 1919, p.1834)

  • 37 ½ acres of Pukeroa Domain, Rotorua, bounded on north by the Tauranga-Rotorua Road, toward the east by Rangiuru St, towards the south and east by the medical reserve, public school reserve, towards the south by Ranolf Street, as shown on L&S plan 6/8/6

1919 – 20 December
Pukeora Military Sanatorium declared a military hospital (New Zealand Gazette, 8 January 1920, p.5)

  • 326 acre block shown on L&S plan 26/1/56 and Hawkes Bay CT4L 198

Dates of declaration and termination of war

1914 – 9 November
Certain proclamations and orders in council extended to state of war with Turkey (New Zealand Gazette, 9 November 1914, p.4019)

  • all proclamations and orders in council relative to the present war with Germany now extended to Turkey (except for the enemy merchant ships regulations of 4 August 1914)

1918 – 10 December
War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918 [WRA 1919 p.20]

  • duration and termination of the war defined – war with Germany began 4 August 1914, and date of conclusion will be named in a Proclamation by the Governor-General in the Gazette (s24)

1919 – 3 July
The following proclamation issued by His Majesty the King is published by His Excellency the Governor-General for the information of the public (New Zealand Gazette, 3 July 1919, p.2079)

  • Treaty of Versailles concluded 28 June 1919

1919 – 16 July
Peace Day to take place on 19 July – public activities to cease (New Zealand Gazette, 16 July 1919, p.2379)

1920 – 20 February
Declaring 10th January, 1920, as date of termination of war with Germany (New Zealand Gazette, 23 February 1920, p.665)

  • declared in accordance with s24 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918

1920 – 9 March
Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

  • lists acts with clauses relating to wartime conditions, their nature, and when they’re due to expire

Home defences

1914 – 9 November
Notice warning people off Motuihi Island (New Zealand Gazette, 12 November 1914, p.4044)

  • set aside as an internment camp for prisoners of war

War memorials

1919 – 5 November
Finance Act 1919

  • local bodies may provide and maintain permanent war memorials of the war with Germany (s15) – provision extended to Doman Boards (s34 of the Finance Act 1920)

1920 – 11 November
Finance Act 1920

  • Hokitika Savings Bank authorised to contribute no more than £200 to war memorial fund (s35)
  • Auckland Savings Bank authorised to contribute £25,000 to the Auckland Museum and War Memorial Building Fund – likewise Auckland City Council £10,000 and Auckland Harbour Board £5000 (s36-37)

Finance Acts in subsequent years permit other local bodies to contribute money towards war memorials (under the heading ‘Local Authorities and Public Bodies’).

Specific military units and boards

Medical Corps

1916 – 24 July
Regulations for the organisation, training, and control of an Officers Training Corps (Medical) (New Zealand Gazette, 27 July 1916, pp.2500-2)

1919 – 15 March
Regulations for the NZ Army Medical Dept and the NZ Army Medical Corps (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1919, p.806)

Dental Corps

1915 – 7 November
NZ Dental Service Corps formed (New Zealand Gazette, 25 November 1915, p.3911

1916 – 16 February
Regulations for the NZ Dental Corps issued, added to the additional regulations for the Military Forces of New Zealand of 22 December 1913 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 February 1916, pp.573-4)

  • rate of pay for NZ Dental Corps increased, 16 January 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 January 1917, p.256)

Motor Service Corps

1913 – 22 December
Regulations for the Military Forces of the Dominion of New Zealand (New Zealand Gazette, 27 January 1914, pp.233-62)

  • sets out the organisation of the Motor Forces Service Corps

1915 – 4 June
Regulations for the New Zealand Motor Forces Service Corps.

  • technically amended 26 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 March 1917, pp.1133-4)
  • NZ Forces Motor-service Corps disbanded 11 February 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 February 1920, p.688)

Ordnance Corps

1917 – 23 January
Regulations for Ordnance Services

  • technically amended 6 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 July 1918, p.2564), 20 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 May 1919, p.1568)

1917 – 1 February
Regulations under the Defence Act 1909, concerning the creation of the New Zealand Army Ordnance Department and the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (New Zealand Gazette, 7 June 1917, pp.2292-3)

  • constitutes the New Zealand Army Ordnance Department and the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps and outlines their establishment, duties, appointment process etc
  • technically amended 13 August 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 August 1917, pp.3233-4), 18 December 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 January 1918, p.27)

Army Pay Dept

1917 – 1 April
Regulations under the Defence Act 1909, concerning the creation of the New Zealand Army Pay Department and the New Zealand Army Pay Corps (New Zealand Gazette, 7 June 1917, pp.2290-1)

  • constitutes the New Zealand Army Pay Department and New Zealand Army Pay Corps and outlines their establishment, duties, appointment process etc

Munitions and Supplies Board

1917 – 3 August
Munitions and Supplies Board created (New Zealand Gazette, 6 August 1917, p.3060)

 

Industrial conditions in New Zealand

Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914

1914 – 10 August
Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914

  • Governor in Council may set maximum prices of goods, and prohibit the export of goods necessary to the public interest
  • Governor in Council may suspend industrial awards and agreements and the provisions of certain Acts during time of war
  • Governor may seize and take possession of any class of goods on behalf of His Majesty
  • Commission of inquiry appointed to report on the prices and availability of goods, their transport, and the need to exercise the powers named in this Act
  • proclamation can ban trade with enemy countries (repealed by Trading with the Enemy Act 1914)
  • Act to continue until 31 December 1915 (extended each year)
  • technically amended by second schedule of the Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1916
  • amended so that Governor-General may take possession of any land and buildings required for a public purpose on 31 October 1917 (s27 of the War Legislation Act 1917) – this clause repealed 22 March 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1921
  • provision for restricting increase in prices of commodities introduced on 31 October 1917 (s21 of the Statute Law Amendment Act 1917) – clause repealed 22 March 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1921
  • provision to make regulations for the purpose of securing supplies for the use of His Majesty’s Government of the United Kingdom introduced on 10 December 1918 by s14-17 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918 – repealed by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance (No. 2) Act 1921
  • provision allowing the Arbitration Court to amend certain awards or industrial agreements with respect to hours of employment and rates of wages introduced 10 December 1918 by s18-19 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918 – repealed by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance (No. 2) Act 1921
  • provision prohibiting the demanding of excessive prices or hoarding goods introduced 10 December 1918 by s21 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918
  • the requirement that the Courts take notice of the existence of a state of war repealed on 4 November 1919 (third schedule of the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919)
  • 1914 and 1915 acts repealed 22 December 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance (No. 2) Act 1921, though all Orders in Council made under the authority of the 1914 Act will continue in force

National Efficiency Board and essential industry

1917 – 16 January
Regulations under the War Regulation Act 1914 concerning exemptions from military service because of work (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1917, pp.164-5)

  • men exempted from military service because of their occupation must notify the Commandant of the Defence Forces when they change job or address

1917 – 5 February
Coal trade regulations under the War Regulations Amendment Act 1916 (Coal Trade Regulations) (New Zealand Gazette, 5 February 1917, pp.440-1) [WRA 1919 p.93]

  • to make provision for the adequate production and proper supply of coal for industry
  • Minister in Charge can require information about the production, importation, exportation, supply, sale, purchase, storage, use, and consumption of coal, and any other relevant matters
  • Minister may take charge of any coal-hulk, wharf or other place or possession necessary to provide the essential industries of NZ with coal
  • coal can only be delivered or shipped by permit
  • household use cannot exceed 5 tons at a time or 20 tons over 28 days
  • amended 21 May 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 May 1918, pp.2065-6) [WRA 1919 pp.148-9]
  • Coal-trade regulations of 5 February 1917 (and amending regs of 28 August 1917) [WRA 1919 pp.117-8], 29 May 1918, 2 June 1919, [WRA 1919 pp.204-5], 15 July 1919, 15 August 1919 revoked (New Zealand Gazette, 15 September 1921, p.2329)
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1917 – 5 February
Regulations under the War Regulations Amendment Act, 1916, relative to the sale of wheat, flour, bran, and pollard (New Zealand Gazette, 6 February 1916, pp.457-8)

  • making provision for the maintenance of the essential wheat and flour industries under the Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914
  • involvement of Board of Trade in setting maximum prices of flour and wheat
  • amended 15 October 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 October 1917, p.3916)
  • prices revised 16 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 April 1917, pp.1055-6)
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1917 – 9 February
Regulations under the War Regulations Amendment Act 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 February 1917, pp.535-7) [WRA 1919 pp.95-7]

  • providing for the lading and unlading of ships as essential industry
  • Controller of a Government Wharf may be appointed to employ all wharf labour at wharves
  • any person of a conduct or character prejudicial to the effectiveness of the wharf may be warned off the wharf
  • Controller may close part of a wharf if they think it best
  • continued by s6 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1917 – 16 February
Coal-mining declared an essential industry (New Zealand Gazette, 16 February 1917, p.700)

1917 – 16 February
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 16 February 1917, pp.699-700) [WRA 1919 pp.97-9]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • industries may be declared essential by Order in Council
  • no person can incite a seditious strike or seditious lockout intended to effect the conduct of military or naval operations, the manufacture or transport of goods required for the war, the loading or unloading of any vessel carrying troops or necessary goods
  • continued by s14 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

1917 – 27 February
National Efficiency Board established (New Zealand Gazette, 5 March 1917, pp.851-4)

1917 – 16 March
Indents for materials and stores from the United Kingdom (New Zealand Gazette, 16 March 1917, p.988)

  • UK Ministry of Munitions have asked that a local authority be established in NZ for the purpose of directly or indirectly maintaining essential industry and transport for the same
  • henceforth all orders necessary to maintain industries of national importance from the UK should be made to the Munitions and Supplies Dept, Union Steam Ship Co buildings, Wellington

1917 – 17 April
The shipping industry, the carriage of goods, merchandise, or passengers by land or sea, the lading and unlading of ships, and the frozen meat industry declared essential industries (New Zealand Gazette, 17 April 1917, p.1291)

1917 – 2 April
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments for the management of soldiers’ properties (Soldiers’ Property Regulations 1917) (New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1917, pp.1211-13) [WRA 1919 pp.103-5]

  • to make provision for the management and disposition of the business, property, and affairs of NZEF soldiers
  • Minister of Defence may, on the recommendation of the National Efficiency Board, constitute Soldiers’ Property Boards of Trustees to carry these regulations into effect
  • soldier may by power of attorney appoint any Board of Trustees to manage his property, business, or affairs (to be confirmed by the National Efficiency Board)
  • the Boards shall continue after the death or incapacity of a soldier, only to finish three months after a soldier gives notice or their will is probated
  • the National Efficiency Board to administer these Boards
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: John Lamont, A.J. Clanfield, J.C. Petersen, Theobald Meagher, C.M. Wood, W.H. Gladding, G.C. Wilson, and Reginald Roberts, 1 November 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 November 1917, p.4201) (I’ve obviously missed some earlier ones – the dates of first gazettal are listed in the cancellation notices)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: John Lamont (No. 2), and John Birmingham, 26 November 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1917, p.4363)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: John Gladding (No. 2), 29 January 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 31 January 1918, p.348)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: C.L. McFarland, John Biggar, George Biggar, 21 February 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 February 1918, p.643)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: W.S. Glenny, John Lorrett, F.M. Goggin, 6 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 April 1918, p.1033)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: James Cain, Felix Baker, 18 June 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 June 1918, p.2462
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Simon Brophy, H.W. Howorth, 19 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 July 1918, p.2735)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: John William Neate, 20 September 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 September 1918, p.3362
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Lancelot Edmund Athelstan Hitchings, 23 October 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 October 1918, p.3593)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Stephen Robson and Frederick William Innes, 7 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 November 1918, p.3710)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Harold Arthur Hopkins, Richard John Stevenson Gray, and William Hicks, 25 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 December 1918, p.3904)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards appointed for: Edward Joseph Williams, 22 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 February 1919, p.593)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: William Hicks, 9 January 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1919, p.109)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: H.A. Hopkins and J.C. Petersen on 30 January, and James Cain on 3 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 February 1919, p.357)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Reginald Roberts, Stephen Robson, James Young, Richard John Stevenson Gray, John William Neate, 19 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 February 1919, p.441)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: William Stanley Glenny, Frederick William Innes, 27 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 March 1919, p.676)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: George Frederick Bulfin, Garret Barry, C.M. Wood, John Lamont, John Lamont (No. 2), on 11 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 March 1919, p.727)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: E.S. Jameson, 18 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1919, p.826)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: L.E.A. Hitchings, 25 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 March 1919, p.868)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: William Reilly, 14 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 April 1919, p.1035) 
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: G. Edwards and A.J. Clanfield, 7 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 May 1919, p.1319)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: E.J. Williams, 8 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 May 1919, p.1382)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: F.W. Rush, 16 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 May 1919, p.62)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: L.B. Brown, 4 June 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 June 1919, p.1766)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: E.W. Larsen, 5 June 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 June 1919, p.1798)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Felix Baker and John Lorrett, 7 July 1919, p.2335)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: C.L. MacFarland, 19 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1919, p.2685)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: F.M. Goggin, 25 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 1919, p.2746)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: F.G. Leahy, John Birmingham, F.J. Hodges, 29 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 September 1919, p.2789)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: A.B. Irvine and H.W. Howarth, 4 September 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 September 1919, p.2845)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Thomas Brennan, 17 October 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 23 October 1919, p.3212)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: W.H. Gladding and W.H. Gladding (No. 2), 30 October 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 November 1919, p.3393)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: J. Biggar and G. Biggar, 8 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 November 1919, p.3461)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Thomas Bate, 1 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1919, p.3668)
  • Soldiers’ Property Boards cancelled for: Simon Brophy, 2 February 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 February 1920, p.509)
  • both the National Efficiency Board and the Soldiers’ Property Regulations (which the NEB administered) revoked, 17 February 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 February 1920, p.676)

1917 – 5 June
Regulations under the War Regulations Amendment Act 1916 restricting the use of coal-gas and electricity (Lighting Regulations 1917) (New Zealand Gazette, 6 June 1917, pp.2281-2) [WRA 1919 pp.107-8]

  • intended to restrict the wasteful consumption of coal gas and electricity and make adequate provision for essential industry
  • lighting authorities can place such restrictions on the use of coal gas or electricity as they see fit
  • the definition of ‘electricity’ expanded to ‘electricity or by means of oil fuel’, 15 October 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 October 1917, p.3916) [WRA 1919 p.122]
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1917 – 5 July
The manufacture and supply of coal-gas, of electricity for light or power, and the supply of water for domestic and industrial purposes declared essential industry (New Zealand Gazette, 5 July 1917, p.2761)

1917 – 16 July
War Regulations Act – protection of mining privileges (Mining Privileges Protection Regulations 1917) (New Zealand Gazette, 16 July 1917, p.2874) [WRA 1919 pp.115-6]

  • intended to protect mining privileges in order to protect an essential industry in the public interest
  • Military Service Boards may create a mining privilege which releases mines from the liability to abandonment or forfeiture under the Mining Act 1908

1917 – 1 October
Membership of the National Efficiency Board altered (New Zealand Gazette, 1 October 1917, p.3707)

1918 – 30 April
War Regulations under section 35, paragraphs a, b, and c, of the War Legislation Act 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 30 April 1918, pp.1273-4) [WRA 1919 pp.144-6]

  • Act allows Governor-General to prohibit or restrict the use of labour or capital in connection with any business or undertaking deemed inessential; denying the registration of any company
  • no person, business, or local authority can commence development works without the consent of the Minister of Finance (except for less than £3000, for residential purposes, or where a building has been destroyed by fire or earthquake and is mainly covered by insurance)
  • no company can expand by issuing new shares and terms of licensing enemy companies changed

1918 – 9 July
Regulations as to importation, sale, and distribution of petrol (New Zealand Gazette, 12 July 1918, pp.2601-4 [WRA 1919 pp.155-9]

  • rules about the rationing and use of petrol for essential industry
  • amended 30 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 August 1918, p.2806) [WRA 1919 p.165]
  • holders of licenses under petrol regulations: 1918: p.3323-4, 3884
  • prices amended 11 February 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 February 1920, p.495)
  • prices amended 26 July 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 August 1920, p.2373)
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)
  • revoked 12 June 1922 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 June 1922, p.1636)

1918 – 27 August
War regulations for the protection of soldiers’ businesses (Soldiers’ Business Regulations) (New Zealand Gazette, 27 August 1918, pp.3067-70) [WRA 1919 pp.168-73]

  • the businesses of soldiers in the present war are essential to the public welfare, so steps need to be taken for the maintenance and management of such businesses; likewise, provisions should be made to restrict businesses which compete with those of soldiers
  • National Efficiency Board can force businesses competing directly with soldiers’ businesses to operate under a restricted business license, which sets such restrictions on business as the NEB deems appropriate
  • one option is the restricted business paying some profits to the Board of Trustees controlling the protected business (Boards of Trustees being those created under the Soldiers’ Property Regulations 1917 of 2 April 1917)
  • business will remain protected when a soldier dies, but protection will cease when the soldier is discharged from the NZEF
  • no-one can start a business directly competing with a soldier’s business without the permission of the NEB
  • revoked 3 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 November 1919, p.3371)

1920 – 17 February
Revocation of establishment of National Efficiency Board, and also of Soldiers’ Property Regulations 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 February 1920, p.676)

  • NEB created by regulations of 27 February and 1 October 1917 – now disbanded
  • Soldiers’ Property Regulations made 2 April 1917, administered by the NEB, also revoked

Imperial requisition

1915 – 3 March
Export of frozen meat (New Zealand Gazette, 3 March 1915, pp.725-6)

  • by Order in Council dated 23 February 1915, the export of meat to anywhere but the UK was banned
  • henceforth, on the basis of an agreement between the government and the freezing companies, the govt will buy all NZ frozen meat available for export to export to the UK govt
  • will be under the control of the newly constituted ‘Imperial Government Meat Supply Branch’
  • scheme comes into operation on 1 March 1915
  • agreed prices listed

1915 – 2 August
Prohibiting the export of scheelite (New Zealand Gazette, 2 August 1915, p.2679)

1916 – 17 January
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 January 1916, p.123) [WRA 1919 p.43]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Minister of Defence may requisition any British ship in any NZ port for use as a transport, and retain it for such as long as he thinks necessary

1916 – 21 December
Requisition of New Zealand wool (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, pp.3957-9)

  • lists ports which have a govt wool-broker, and the names of the wool brokers

1917 – 16 January
Purchase of cheese by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1917, pp.168-9)

  • system by which cheese bulk-purchased for UK govt

1917 – 18 January
Appointment of Requisitions Committee (New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1917, p.1189)

  • committee to organise and direct the conduct of requisition schemes

1917 – 14 March
Purchase of hides by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 14 March 1917, pp.948-50)

  • outlines bulk purchase scheme, including the names of brokers and receiving depots
  • notified that the govt has ceased purchasing hides and calk-skins, 16 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 April 1918, p.1057) [WRA 1919 p.143]
  • 16 April 1918 notice revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 24 April
Regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 with respect to the sale and purchase of sheep-skins, hides, and calf-skins (New Zealand Gazette, 24 April 1917, pp.1397-9) [WRA 1919 pp.106-7]

  • Gazette notice dated 31 January 1917 set forth the terms by which the British govt would purchase NZ hides for the purposes of war
  • therefore NZ govt restricts the sale of sheep-skins, hides, and calf-skins except to the NZ govt
  • amended 11 February 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 February 1918, p.535 [WRA 1919 pp.138-9]
  • revoked 16 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 April 1918, p.1057)
  • applications for exporting hides and calf-skins will be considered, 7 May 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 May 1918, p.1804)
  • the industry is essential in the public welfare, so the regulations restrict licensees of meat-exporting slaughterhouses from carrying on the business of fellmongering (New Zealand Gazette, 18 September 1918, pp.3307-8) [WRA 1919 p.178]
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1917 – 10 August
War Regulations – sale and purchase of wool prohibited (New Zealand Gazette, 10 August 1917, pp.3217-8)

  • by proclamation of 21 December 1916, the NZ govt could purchase all the wool of that season’s clip, and this notice continues that
  • amended 10 October 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 October 1917, pp.3846-7)
  • extended 8 October 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 October 1918, pp.3511-2) [WRA 1919 pp.180-1]
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1917 – 25 August
Requisition of New Zealand wool (New Zealand Gazette, 25 August 1917, pp.3319-21)

  • wool brokers and wool broker ports listed

1917 – 5 September
Requisition by Imperial Government of New Zealand wool and other supplies (New Zealand Gazette, 6 September 1917, p.3521)

  • the Department of Imperial Government Supplies to henceforth direct all matters relating to requisitions of wool and other supplies by the Imperial Government

1917 – 10 September
War Regulations – purchase of wheat prohibited (New Zealand Gazette, 10 September 1917, pp.3535-6)

  • NZ govt only to purchase wheat, in interests of maintaining supplies

1917 – 15 October
Requisition of New Zealand wool (New Zealand Gazette, 15 October 1917, pp.3925-8)

  • wool brokers and wool broker ports listed

1917 – 19 November
War regulations – sale and purchase of lamb pelts prohibited (New Zealand Gazette, 19 November 1917, pp.4275-6) [WRA 1919 pp.123-4]

  • sale of lamb pelts prohibited except for sale to the British govt

1918 – 1 February
Purchase of sheep-skins by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 1 February 1918, pp.373-5)

  • wool brokers listed

1918 – 2 February
Purchase of butter by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 4 February 1918, pp.379-80)

1918 – 2 February
Purchase of cheese by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 4 February 1918, pp.381-2)

1918 – 17 May
Purchase of slipe wool by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 17 May 1918, pp.1871-5)

  • freezing works listed

1918 – 16 April
Purchase of butter by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 16 April 1918, p.1058)

  • some butter to be retained from export for local consumption

1918 – 17 September
War regulations restricting the business of fellmongering by licensees of meat-export slaughter-houses (New Zealand Gazette, 18 September 1918, pp.3307-8)

  • sale of sheep-skins to anyone except the govt banned under order in council of 24 April 1917
  • the industry is essential in the public welfare, so the regulations restrict licensees of meat-exporting slaughterhouses from carrying on the business of fellmongering

1918 – 2 December
Requisition of New Zealand wool (New Zealand Gazette, 2 December 1918, pp.3863-6)

1919 – 23 January
Purchase of slipe wool by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 25 January 1919, pp.203-6)

  • freezing companies listed

1920 – 9 August
Purchase of sheep-skins and wool by the government (New Zealand Gazette, 12 August 1920, p.2395)

  • extends purchase notices of 1 February 1918 and 2 December 1918 concerning wool purchase, to all wool produced until 30 September 1920

1920 – 11 November
Finance Act 1920

  • bonus payments for wool requisitioned by the UK government to be distributed amongst producers (s22)

Domestic price control and rationing

1914 – 31 August
Commission to inquire into and report upon certain matters under the Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 31 August 1914, p.3403)

  • Commission appointed to report on the state of prices of food stuffs, the quantity or demand or such food stuffs available, and the advisability of fixing maximum prices for those goods

1914 – 29 September
Fixing the maximum price of wheat and flour (New Zealand Gazette, 29 September 1914, pp.3653-4)

  • revoked and revised 19 October 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 October 1914, pp.3821-2)

1915 – 7 January
Fixing the maximum price of wheat (New Zealand Gazette, 7 January 1915, pp.141-2)

  • notice revoked 6 February 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 February 1915, p.539)

1916 – 8 August
Appropriations Act 1916

  • Governor permitted to raise the duty payable on imported wheat or flour if competition is being carried on, on unfair lines, by importers; to apply for the rest of the war or six months after (s32)
  • increased to twelve months after the war on 4 November 1919 (Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919 s5)
  • s32 repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 13 October
Fixing the maximum price of butter (New Zealand Gazette, 13 October 1916, p.3286)

  • export of butter and cheese banned by another notice of the same date (pp.3287-8)
  • notice revoked and prices revised, 15 February 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 February 1917, pp.635-6)
  • amended as to shipping, 26 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 Marcn 1917, pp.1054-5)

1917 – 5 February
Fixing the maximum prices of wheat, flour, bran, and pollard (New Zealand Gazette, 6 February 1917, pp.455-7) [WRA 1919 pp.94-5]

  • regulations issued about the sale of same (pp.457-8)
  • amended 7 May 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 May 1917, p.2033), 14 May 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 14 May 1917, p.2044), 8 October 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 October 1917, p.3843), 15 October 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 October 1917, p.3916)

1917 – 14 May
Fixing the maximum price of milk within the Borough of Wanganui and the town districts of Gonville and Castlecliff (New Zealand Gazette, 14 May 1917, p.2043)

  • amended 9 July 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 July 1917, p.2764); 11 June 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 June 1918, p.2211)
  • revoked 15 July 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 July 1919, p.2423)

1917 – 22 December
Fixing the maximum price of wheat (New Zealand Gazette, 22 December 1917, pp.4609-10)

1917 – 22 December
Wheat Trade Regulations (New Zealand Gazette, 22 December 1917, pp.4610-7 [WRA 1919 pp.127-37]

  • list of companies appointed as brokers for the purchase and sale of wheat (New Zealand Gazette, 28 March 1918, p.928)
  • amended 25 February 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 February 1919, pp.551-8) [WRA 1919 pp.188-93], 3 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 April 1919, pp.961-2) [WRA 1919 pp.198-9], 19 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 August 1919, p.2649), 16 March 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1920, pp.912-20)
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1918 – 18 February
Maximum prices of bacon and ham (New Zealand Gazette, 22 February 1918, p.593)

  • revoked and replaced 19 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 December 1918, p.4057)
  • both notices revoked 11 February 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 February 1920, p.495)

1918 – 18 March
Maximum price of bread (New Zealand Gazette, 19 March 1918, p.849)

1918 – 23 March
Maximum price of grass-seed and clover-seed (New Zealand Gazette, 23 March 1918, p.895)

  • revoked 23 July 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 August 1918, p.2771)

1918 – 16 April
Fixing the maximum price of butter (New Zealand Gazette, 16 April 1918, p.1058)

  • notice on same page outlining the purchase of butter by the government
  • notice revoked and replaced 12 April 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 April 1920, pp.1140-1)
  • prices revised 15 June 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 June 1920, p.1975)

1918 – 7 May
Fixing the maximum retail price of wheat (New Zealand Gazette, 7 May 1918, pp.1755-6)

1918 – 6 August
Regulations relating to the export of timber

  • amended 18 February 1919
  • amended 19 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 August 1919, p.2651)
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1918 – 10 September
War regulations – sale of milk in boroughs (Milk-supply regulations 1918) (New Zealand Gazette, 11 September 1918, pp.3199-200) [WRA 1919 pp.176-7]

  • regulating and controlling the supply of milk so it will remain available to inhabitants of boroughs at a reasonable price and of good quality
  • these regulations shall be in force in Wellington from 20 January 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1919, p.102)
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1918 – 22 October
War regulations prescribing a standard size for butter-boxes (New Zealand Gazette, 22 October 1918, pp.3567-8) [WRA 1919 p.182]

  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1918 – 14 November
Fixing the maximum prices of oranges and lemons (New Zealand Gazette, 15 November 1918, p.3769)

  • another notice (pp.3769-70) permits the seizure of all oranges and lemons in certain boroughs of Wellington
  • maximum wholesale and retail prices set 15 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 November 1918, p.3787)
  • orders revoked 13 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 December 1918, pp.3999-4000)

1918 – 18 November
Fixing the maximum retail prices of vegetables, apples, and fish in the Wellington districts (New Zealand Gazette, 18 November 1918, pp.3789-90)

  • maximum prices fixed in Wellington district
  • another notice (p.3826) permits the seizure of vegetables, apples, and fish in certain boroughs of Wellington
  • maximum wholesale and retail prices set 21 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 November 1918, p.3825)
  • orders revoked 13 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 December 1918, pp.3999-4000)

1919 – 24 January
Fixing the maximum price of corn-sacks (New Zealand Gazette, 24 January 1919, p.201

1919 – 25 February
Order in council fixing the maximum retail price of bacon (New Zealand Gazette, 25 February 1919, p.550)

1919 – 25 February
Fixing the maximum price of wheat of the season 1918-1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 February 1919, pp.550-1)

1919 – 25 February
Wheat Trade Regulations 1919 (adds to the scheme of wheat purchasing described in order in council of 22 December 1917) (New Zealand Gazette, 25 February 1919, pp.551-8) [WRA 1919 pp.188-93]

  • outlines the scheme of government control of the wheat market through brokers
  • amended 3 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 April 1919, pp.961-2) [WRA 1919 pp.198-9], 19 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 August 1919, p.2649), 16 March 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1920, pp.912-20)
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1919 – 8 May
Fixing the maximum wholesale and retail prices of rice in New Zealand (New Zealand Gazette, 8 May 1919, p.1341)

  • revoked 1 July 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 3 July 1919, p.2075)

1919 – 23 May
Exportation of potatoes (New Zealand Gazette, 29 May 1919, p.1609)

  • Minister of Customs prepared to consider applications to export potatoes

1919 – 10 June
Prohibiting the importation of wheatmeal and ground wheat (New Zealand Gazette, 19 June 1919, p.1845)

1919 – 19 August
Prohibiting the importation of saccharin of foreign manufacture (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1919, p.2660)

1919 – 6 October
War Regulations as to the manufacture and sale of boots (New Zealand Gazette, 7 October 1919, pp.3085-6)

  • Board of Trade to approve boot designs
  • administration of these regulations transferred to the Board of Trade, 6 October 1920 (3rd schedule of War Regulations Continuance Act 1920)

1919 – 15 December
Prohibiting the exportation of coined silver (New Zealand Gazette, 8 January 1920, p.39)

1920 – 11 February
Board of Trade Regulations – control of the sale of flour (Board of Trade (Flour-Milling) Regulations 1920) (New Zealand Gazette, 12 February 1920, p.495)

  • made under the Board of Trade Act 1919

1920 – 16 March
Fixing the maximum price of wheat (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1920, pp.911-12

  • Wheat Trade Regulations 1920 in same issue

1920 – 16 March
Wheat trade regulations 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1920, pp.912-20)

  • wheat trade scheme extended and modified

1920 – 11 April
Maximum prices of flour, bran, and pollard (New Zealand Gazette, 15 April 1920, pp.1140-1)

  • amended 21 April 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 April 1920, p.1255); 5 July 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 July 1920, p.2131)

1920 – 28 June
Board of Trade regulations – control of distribution of cement, bricks, or timber (New Zealand Gazette, 29 June 1920, pp.2053-4)

1920 – 18 October
Fixing the maximum price of butter (New Zealand Gazette, 18 October 1920, p.2893)

Banned and permitted exports

Searched 1914-21

1913 – 15 December
Customs Act 1913

  • Governor empowered to ban the export of military goods or goods which may be used to manufacture military goods in time of war (s47a)

1914 – 4 August
Prohibiting the export of coal under certain circumstances (New Zealand Gazette, 4 August 1914, p.3041)

  • export of coal banned under s47 of the Customs Act 1913, except where the Minister of Defence is sure that the coal is to be used by His Majesty’s ships and not a foreign ship of war
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 7 August
Proclamation setting forth the law and policy with regard to trading with the enemy (New Zealand Gazette, 7 August 1914, pp.3093-4, 3175)

  • King’s proclamation instructing that trade with enemy countries be stopped
  • detail of regulations expanded (New Zealand Gazette, 15 September 1914, pp.3547-9)

1914 – 7 August
Prohibiting the export of certain specified goods (under s47 of the Customs Act 1913) (New Zealand Gazette, 7 August 1914, pp.3095-6)

  • oils and chemicals, aeroplanes, pack animals, guns and ammunitions, engines etc
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 8 August
Prohibiting the export of certain specified goods to specified parts of Europe (New Zealand Gazette, 8 August 1914, pp.3111-2)

  • metals and chemicals, camp equipment, telegraph cables, guns and munitions, steam vessels etc could not be exported to foreign ports in Europe and on the Baltic and Mediterranean Sea, except those of France, Russia (except the Baltic ports), Spain, and Portugal
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 10 August
Prohibiting the export of flour and oatmeal, and of wheat, oats, and other cereals (New Zealand Gazette, 10 August 1914, p.3115)

  • those foodstuffs prohibited from export except in cases where the Minister of Defence is satisfied they’re going to His Majesty’s naval or military forces – partially revoked by notice of 13 August 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 August 1914, p.3171)
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 13 August
Allowing the export of oats, barley, linseed, beans, and peas to any part of His Majesty’s dominions (New Zealand Gazette, 13 August 1914, p.3171)

  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 2 November
Prohibiting the export of wool except to specified places (under Customs Act 1913 and Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914) (New Zealand Gazette, 3 November 1914, p.3931)

  • wool can be exported to other parts of the British empire and other places as the Minister of Customs consents
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 2 November
Prohibiting the export of certain specified goods (under s47 of the Customs Act 1914 and the Trade and Commerce Act 1914) (New Zealand Gazette, 3 November 1914, pp.3932-3)

  • metals and chemicals, aeroplanes, barbed wire, military clothing, guns and ammunition, leather, saddlery and horse shoes, vehicles of all kinds, vessels, warships etc cannot be exported to foreign ports in Europe and on the Baltic and Mediterranean Sea, except those of France, Russia (except the Baltic ports), Spain, and Portugal
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 17 December
Prohibiting the export of forage from New Zealand (New Zealand Gazette, 17 December 1914, p.4363)

  • export prohibited except as the Minister of Defence directs
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1915 – 22 February
Prohibiting the export of whale oil except to specified places (New Zealand Gazette, 24 February 1915, p.661)

  • can only be exported to UK and Australia
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1915 – 23 February
Prohibiting the export of mutton, beef, and tinned meat except to the UK or other specified places (New Zealand Gazette, 24 February 1915, p.662)

  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1915 – 8 March
Prohibiting the export of veal and rabbits, except to the UK or other specified places (New Zealand Gazette, 8 March 1915, p.816)

  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1915 – 8 March
Prohibiting the export of vessels, boats, or craft (New Zealand Gazette, 11 March 1915, p.833)

  • to prevent ships being moved to enemy ownership
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1915 – 15 March
Prohibiting the export of oats (New Zealand Gazette, 15 March 1915, p.880)

  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1915 – 1 April
Prohibiting the export of certain goods (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

  • revokes earlier orders in council relating to prohibiting exports
  • second schedule lists goods which can’t be exported to any destination without permission of Minister of Customs: coal, flour, oatmeal, wheat, oats, forage – these may be exported to Britain from 22 November 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 November 1915, pp.3889-90)
  • third schedule lists goods which can only be exported to UK: frozen mutton and lamb, chilled and frozen beef or veal, rabbits, tinned meats
  • fourth schedule lists goods which can’t be exported to foreign ports in Europe except Belgium, Spain, and Portugal: sausage skins, gum, sulphur, flax, food for men and animals, seeds and nuts, animal and vegetable oils, seeds/clover/grass, bags and sacks, asbestos, copra – extended to include Italy on 23 August 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 August 1915, p.2977)
  • fifth schedule lists goods which can only be exported to Britain and British dominions: wool, hides, barley/linseed/beans/peas, extracts of meat, scheelite, whale oil, petroleum, rubber, copper, graphite, wool cloth and yarns, blankets and horse-rugs, vessels/boats/crafts, contraband of war – flour, oatmeal, wheat, oats, and forage added to list from 22 November 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 November 1915, pp.3889-90)
  • this list and its amendments revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1915 – 3 May
Prohibiting the export of butter (New Zealand Gazette, 3 May 1915, p.1685)

1915 – 21 June
Prohibiting the export of potatoes (New Zealand Gazette, 21 June 1915, p.2115)

1915 – 29 July
Prohibiting the export of sheep and cattle (New Zealand Gazette, 29 July 1915, p.2677)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1915 – 2 August
Prohibiting the export of scheelite (New Zealand Gazette, 2 August 1915, p.2679)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1915 – 22 November
Prohibiting the importation or exportation of unset diamonds (New Zealand Gazette, 22 November 1915, p.3890)

  • amended 8 December 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 December 1915, p.4009), 3 August 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 August 1916, p.2633)
  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1915 – 6 December
Prohibiting the exportation of all articles to the Netherlands (New Zealand Gazette, 7 December 1915, p.3985)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1915 – 13 December
Prohibiting the exportation of all articles to China and Siam (New Zealand Gazette, 13 December 1915, p.4032)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 31 January
Prohibiting the exportation of tallow except to the United Kingdom (New Zealand Gazette, 1 February 1916, p.385)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 2 February
Prohibiting the exportation of certain hides (New Zealand Gazette, 3 February 1916, p.424)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 15 February
Prohibiting the exportation of leather (New Zealand Gazette, 16 February 1916, p.495)

  • certain kinds of leather permissible for export under certain conditions (New Zealand Gazette, 18 February 1916, p.583)
  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 22 February
Prohibiting the importation of certain explosives (New Zealand Gazette, 23 February 1916, pp.543-4)

  • revoked 8 January 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1919, p.95)

1916 – 1 March
Prohibiting the exportation of all articles to Switzerland (New Zealand Gazette, 1 March 1916, p.625)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 7 March
Prohibiting the exportation of wool (New Zealand Gazette, 7 March 1916, p.691)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 13 March
Prohibiting the export of copra and oleaginous seeds, nuts, and kernels (New Zealand Gazette, 13 March 1916, p.771)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 29 March
Prohibiting the importation of certain articles (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1916, p.970)

  • oxydonors, oxygenators, or oxypathors

1916 – 29 March
Prohibiting the exportation of hides and calf-skins (New Zealand Gazette, 29 March 1916, p.893)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 10 April
Prohibiting the export of certain goods (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

  • revokes April 1915 to March 1916 gazette notices
  • second schedule – goods which can’t be exported except with the permission of the Minister of Customs: coal, sheep, cattle, scheelite, hides, leather, unset diamonds
  • third schedule – can only be sent to the UK: frozen meat, tallow, wool and sheep skins, copra, oleaginous seeds/nuts/kernels
  • fourth schedule – can only be sent to UK or Australia: hides less than 45lb in weight, calf-skins
  • fifth schedule – goods can be sent to UK or other British possessions and protectorates: sheep skins, barley/linseed/beans/peas, flour/oatmeal/wheat/oats, forage, extracts of meat, whale oil, petroleum, rubber, copper, graphite, wool cloth/yarns etc, blankets and horse rugs, vessels/boats, sausage skins, gum, flax, food for humans, seeds/clover/grass, bags and sacks, asbestos, pepper, capsicums, war contraband
  • sixth schedules: goods can only be sent to the following countries: UK/British possessions, France, Japan, USA, Argentine, Brazil, Uruguay, Pacific Islands
  • veal can be exported from 21 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 May 1919, p.1490)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1916 – 11 May
Prohibiting the exportation of butter (New Zealand Gazette, 11 May 1916, p.1723)

  • revoked 13 October 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 October 1916, pp.3287-8)

1916 – 24 July
Prohibiting the exportation of sheep-skins (with or without wool), pig-skins, and pelts (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1916, pp.2485-6)

  • revoked 18 September 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 September 1916, pp.3035-6) – these can now be exported to any British dominions
  • 18 September 1916 notice revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)
  • prohibition on the exportation of sheep-skins and pelts revoked 22 November 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 November 1920, p.3160)

1916 – 9 August
Prohibiting the exportation of scrap-iron (New Zealand Gazette, 17 August 1916, p.2692)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1916 – 2 September
Prohibiting the exportation of platinum and wattle bark (New Zealand Gazette, 2 September 1916, p.2396)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1916 – 18 September
Prohibiting the exportation of rennet and the importation of foreign soap (New Zealand Gazette, 18 September 1916, p.3036)

  • soap from France permitted as of 6 November 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 November 1916, p.3502)
  • soap from Italy and Japan permitted as of 29 January 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 February 1917, p.391)
  • revoked 2 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 December 1918, p.3879)

1916 – 13 October
Prohibiting the export of butter and cheese (New Zealand Gazette, 13 October 1916, pp.3287-8)

  • maximum price of butter fixed by notice of the same date (p.3286)
  • export license required to export butter, butter-fat levy to be paid as determined by the Board of Trade
  • license procedure amended 27 November 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1916, p.3695)
  • restrictions extended 10 October 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 October 1917, p.3847)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1916 – 30 October
Exportation of hides (New Zealand Gazette, 2 November 1916, p.3470)

  • Minister of Customs permits the export of 10,000 hides for military purposes to Canada

1916 – 18 November
Prohibiting the exportation of wool, except with the consent of the Minister of Customs (New Zealand Gazette, 18 November 1916, p.3613)

  • amends 10 April 1916 notice which allows wool to be exported to Britain
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1916 – 27 November
Prohibiting the importation of sanatogen (New Zealand Gazette, 1 December 1916, p.3706)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3574)

1916 – 11 December
Prohibiting the importation of Kugelman’s Herbal Remedies and other goods (New Zealand Gazette, 14 December 1916, p.3819)

1916 – 18 December
Prohibiting the exportation of certain chemicals (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, p.3889)

  • caustic soda, caustic potash, carbonate of soda (soda-ash), bichromate of soda, silicate of soda, sodium sulphide, sodium sulphite, sodium nitrate (chili saltpetre)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1916 – 18 December
Prohibiting the importation of gas-mantles of foreign manufacture (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, pp.3889-90)

  • except from the UK and British dominions
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3574)

1917 – 16 January
Prohibiting the export of cheese (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1917, pp.167-8)

  • another notice in same gazette concerning the purchase of cheese by the govt (pp.168-9)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 16 January
Importation of certain hop preparations and substitutes prohibited (New Zealand Gazette, 25 January 1917, p.252)

1917 – 29 January
Prohibiting the export of sheep-skins and pelts (New Zealand Gazette, 1 February 1917, p.437)

  • amended 12 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 March 1917, p.987)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 30 January
Exportation of beef casings (New Zealand Gazette, 1 February 1917, p.419)

  • applications to export beef casings to the USA will be considered by the Minister of Customs

1917 – 31 January
Exportation of tallow to Russia (New Zealand Gazette, 1 February 1917, p.419)

  • up to 150 tons of tallow per month can be exported to Russia, to be consigned to the Russian government

1917 – 5 February
Prohibiting the importation of Violetta Electric Apparatus (New Zealand Gazette, 15 February 1917, pp.601-2)

1917 – 7 February
Exportation of stilton cheese and dairy cheese (New Zealand Gazette, 8 February 1917, p.506)

  • these may be exported to British dominions as well as Britain
  • notice superseded 12 June 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 14 June 1917, p.2349), permitting the export of stilton cheese, cheddar cheese (3rd grade), cheddar cheese (1st or 2nd grade less than export size), and dairy cheese

1917 – 8 February
Prohibiting the exportation of wheat and oats and of certain productions thereof (New Zealand Gazette, 8 February 1917, p.531)

  • wheat, oats, other cereals, flour, oatmeal, crushed oats, rolled oats, and similar preparations
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 12 March
Prohibiting the export of hides and calf-skins to any destination (New Zealand Gazette, 14 March 1917, p.948)

  • can only be exported to UK govt
  • same gazette contains the terms of purchase by UK govt (pp.948-50)
  • revoked 16 April 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 16 April 1918, p.1057)

1917 – 7 May
Prohibiting the importation of the medicine known as Vitadatio (New Zealand Gazette, 17 May 1917, p.2065)

1917 – 14 May
Prohibiting the exportation of sapphires and rubies (New Zealand Gazette, 14 May 1917, p.2044)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 18 June
Export of casings to the United States (New Zealand Gazette, 21 June 1917, p.2454)

  • export permitted with a permit

1917 – 16 July
Export of hemp (phormium tenax) to the United States (New Zealand Gazette, 19 July 1917, p.2886)

  • can be exported without permit

1917 – 6 August
Prohibiting the exportation of empty bottles and jars, and bicarbonate of soda (New Zealand Gazette, 6 August 1917, p.3061)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 13 August
Prohibiting the exportation of scrap metal, postage stamps, and chemicals, drugs, and chemical preparations (New Zealand Gazette, 16 August 1917, pp.3230-1

  • prohibition on exporting postage stamps lifted 28 January 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 30 January 1919, p.219)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 25 August
Prohibiting the export of salt (New Zealand Gazette, 30 August 1917, p.3339)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 17 September
Prohibiting the exportation of iron wire, wire nails and staples, and manufactured articles of metal generally (New Zealand Gazette, 17 September 1917, p.3613)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 1 October
Exportation of tallow (New Zealand Gazette, 4 October 1917, p.3820)

  • applications will be considered for export of limited quantities of tallow to the USA

1917 – 12 November
Prohibiting the importation of wheat, flour, bran, and pollard (New Zealand Gazette, 13 November 1917, p.4225)

  • notice re, 27 November 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 November 1917, p.4354)

1917 – 19 November
Prohibiting the exportation of paints and colours (New Zealand Gazette, 19 November 1917, p.4276)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 19 November
Prohibiting the importation of preparations purporting to be remedies for drink and drug habits (New Zealand Gazette, 22 November 1917, p.4287)

1917 – 3 December
Prohibiting the exportation of certain roofing materials (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1917, p.4440)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1917 – 22 December
Prohibiting the exportation of pork, bacon, and hams (New Zealand Gazette, 22 December 1917, p.4617)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 14 January
Prohibiting the exportation of plate and sheet glass (New Zealand Gazette, 17 January 1918, p.162)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 31 January
Prohibiting the exportation of live pigs and manures of every description (New Zealand Gazette, 31 January 1918, p.312)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 5 February
Exportation of tallow (New Zealand Gazette, 7 February 1918, p.406)

  • Customs will consider applications to export some grades of tallow to the USA

1918 – 11 February
Prohibiting the exportation of glue pieces, hide pieces, face pieces, leg pieces, hide trimmings, sinews, lugs, and similar goods for the manufacture of glue and gelatine (New Zealand Gazette, 14 February 1918, p.494)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 18 March
Prohibiting the exportation of bags, bagging, sacks, sacking, and piecegoods of jute, hessian, or linen (New Zealand Gazette, 21 March 1918, p.863)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 5 March
Importation of fowl-wheat (New Zealand Gazette, 7 March 1918, p.782)

  • Customs can permit the importation of wheat from Australia owing to wheat failures in Canterbury

1918 – 16 April
Prohibiting the exportation of electrical material (New Zealand Gazette, 16 April 1918, p.1059

  • amended 11 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 March 1919, p.703)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)
  • 11 March 1919 notice revoked 12 April 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 April 1920, pp.1140-1)

1918 – 16 April
Prohibiting the importation into New Zealand of spirits of less than a certain strength (New Zealand Gazette, 18 April 1918, p.1078)

1918 – 14 May
Prohibiting the exportation of oils of every description (New Zealand Gazette, 16 May 1918, p.1844)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 4 June
Prohibiting the exportation of empty casks of every kind (New Zealand Gazette, 4 June 1918, p.2175)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 18 June
Prohibiting the importation of Pulvermacher’s Electric of Galvanic Apparatus (New Zealand Gazette, 27 June 1918, p.2426)

  • device considered fraudulent
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 24 June
Prohibiting the exportation of peas (New Zealand Gazette, 27 June 1918, p.2426)

1918 – 25 July
Export of tallow to the United States (New Zealand Gazette, 25 July 1918, p.2735)

  • conditions under which it may be undertaken
  • amended 18 September 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 September 1918, p.3323)

1918 – 30 July
Prohibiting the exportation of cotton piecegoods suited for use as meat-wraps, cheese-cloths, or similar articles (New Zealand Gazette, 8 August 1918, p.2823)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 6 August
Regulations imposing restrictions on the export of timber (New Zealand Gazette, 6 August 1918, pp.2809-11) [WRA 1919 pp.165-8]

  • amended 18 February 1919 [WRA 1919 pp.186-7]

1918 – 14 August
Exportation of neatsfoot oil (New Zealand Gazette, 15 August 1918, p.2933)

  • applications to export neatsfoot oil will be considered
  • further notice 5 November 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 November 1918, p.3710)

1918 – 20 August
Prohibiting the exportation of gelatine and glue (New Zealand Gazette, 22 August 1918, p.3034)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1918 – 27 August
Prohibiting the importation of goods from the Regal Post-Card Company (New Zealand Gazette, 29 August 1918, p.3081)

  • Sydney company; their products not in the national interest

1918 – 7 September
Prohibiting importation of corn-sacks (New Zealand Gazette, 7 September 1918, p.3197)

1918 – 6 December
Exportation of tinned meats to British possessions and the USA (New Zealand Gazette, 12 December 1918, p.3940)

  • no permit to export required henceforth

1918 – 6 December
Exportation of hides and calfskins to the United Kingdom and British possessions (New Zealand Gazette, 6 December 1918, p.3940)

  • no permit to export required henceforth
  • notice cancelled 5 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 March 1918, pp.675-6)

1918 – 31 December
Importation and exportation of unset diamonds (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1919, p.74)

  • updates notices of 10 April 1916 and 22 November 1915, cancels notice of 9 December 1915
  • permits the trade in diamonds
  • further permits trade, 11 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1919, pp.804-5)

1918 – 31 December
Exportation of sapphires and rubies (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1919, p.74)

  • exportation permitted

1919 – 10 February
Prohibiting the export of potatoes (New Zealand Gazette, 10 February 1919, p.400)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1919 – 5 March
Export of hides and calf-skins – permits for export (New Zealand Gazette, 6 March 1919, pp.675-6)

  • restrictions on these exports lifted – permits for export may be applied for – forms
  • further forms, 16 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 April 1919, p.1092)
  • these two notices cancelled – new rules and prices for exporting hides and calf-skins, 2 October 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 2 October 1919, p.3083)
  • 2 October 1919 notice amended, 6 October 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 October 1919, p.3111)
  • 2 October 1919 notice cancelled and replaced (New Zealand Gazette, 20 February 1920, p.573

1919 – 18 March
Prohibiting the importation (and exportation) of tungsten and its alloys and compounds, also tungsten ores (New Zealand Gazette, 27 March 1919, pp.855-6)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1919 – 17 November
Prohibiting the exportation of sugar, jam, confectionery, and other articles of food preserved with sugar (New Zealand Gazette, 20 November 1919, p.3529)

1919 – 24 November
Prohibiting the export of certain goods (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

  • 37 gazette notices prohibiting the export of certain goods between 1916 and 1919 revoked
  • remaining items to not be exported: bags, butter, cattle, cheese, coal, cotton, frozen meat, glue and gelatine, hides/calf-skin/leather, manures, pigs, platinum, pork, potatoes, rennet, Russian rouble notes, scrap iron and steel, sheep/sheep skins, tungsten, wattle bark, wheat and cereals, wool
  • certain types of wool may be exported without restriction from 19 November 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 November 1920, p.3170)

1919 – 23 December
Prohibiting the exportation from New Zealand of silver (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1920, p.151)

1920 – 19 January
Prohibiting the exportation of preserved milk, condensed milk, and dried milk (New Zealand Gazette, 23 January 1920, p.247)

1920 – 25 February
Prohibiting the exportation of textile piecegoods containing wool, and all articles made wholly or partly from wool (New Zealand Gazette, 4 March 1920, p.730)

1920 – 14 May
Prohibiting the exportation of kauri-gum which has been in any manner adulterated or mixed with other gum (New Zealand Gazette, 27 May 1920, p.1727)

Goods the UK won’t export or import

1914 – 24 November
List of goods the exportation of which from the United Kingdom is prohibited (New Zealand Gazette, 26 November 1914, p.4178)

  • a wide variety of arms and military stores; drugs, chemicals, and medical supplies; fibres, cordage, and textiles; foods, forage and provisions; metals and minerals; oils, lubricants and fuel; and skins, wool, and leather
  • revised list published 5 January 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 January 1915, p.48)
  • revised list 17 September 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 September 1917, pp.3640-4)

1916 – 30 March
Articles prohibited to be imported into the UK (New Zealand Gazette, 30 March 1916, p.929)

  • Imperial Govt directs that these items not be sent to the UK
  • paper and cardboard, periodicals longer than 16 pages, tobacco and cigarettes, woods, stones, slates, preserved fruits
  • additional items (New Zealand Gazette, 11 May 1916, p.1695),
  • previous two lists revoked and replaced (New Zealand Gazette, 1 June 1916, p.1871)
  • additional items (New Zealand Gazette, 15 June 1916, p.1974)
  • further notices: 1916 p.2452, 2633, 2966, 3350, 3728, 3826; 1917 p.829, 2786, 3548, 4354; 1918: 1114, 3470, 3884, 3932

1916 – 19 July
Goods prohibited to be exported from the United Kingdom (New Zealand Gazette, 20 July 1916, pp.2419-24)

  • very detailed Imperial gazettal

1916 – 16 August
Prohibiting the importation of certain goods from Australia (New Zealand Gazette, 24 August 1916, p.2825)

  • Klepalo (cream of tartar substitute)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3574)

1916 – September
The Ministry of Munitions in the UK have announced that British manufacturers can no longer supply engineering tools and supplies for export because they’re needed for the war effort (New Zealand Gazette, 21 September 1916, p.3068)

1918 – 26 February
British manufactures (New Zealand Gazette, 28 February 1918, p.625)

  • a list of British manufacturers who now produce goods formerly manufactured mainly by Germany has been prepared by the British Board of Trade, and is available from HM’s Trade Commissioner, Wellington

1919 – 19 March
Importation of goods into the UK (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1919, p.819)

  • all bans on imports into the UK now lifted except for gold, spirits, and hops
  • notice replaced 16 June 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 19 June 1919, p.1848); 11 August 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 14 August 1919, pp.2620-1)

1919 – 9 July
Articles prohibited to be imported into the UK (New Zealand Gazette, 10 July 1919, p.2335)

  • following items can only be imported into the UK by license: chemicals, electrical goods, scientific/mathematical/optical instruments, tungsten powder and ferro-tungsten

Goods the USA won’t export or import

1918 – 9 January
Reprint from ‘Board of Trade Journal’ (New Zealand Gazette, 10 January 1918, pp.79-80)

  • USA proclamation of 27 August 1917 prohibits the export of various articles required for warfare

1918 – 9 January
Restrictions on the importation of goods to the USA (New Zealand Gazette, 10 January 1918, p.30)

  • list of goods which can only be exported to the USA with an import license
  • amended 12 February 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 14 February 1918, p.498)
  • further notices: 1918: 1799, 2617, 2829

1918 – 27 February
Restrictions on importation and exportation of goods to and from the United States (New Zealand Gazette, 28 February 1918, p.625)

  • USA bans all exports from and imports to other countries (without import licenses) from 16 February 1918

1918 – 23 December
Exportation of rabbit skins to the USA (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1919, p.74)

  • US authorities lift ban on rabbit skin imports

1919 – 15 January
Importation to US of NZ hemp (and tallow, hides, skins undressed, fur-skins, and rabbit skins) (New Zealand Gazette, 16 January 1919, p.103)

  • US govt will now issue import licenses

1919 – 19 February
Importation of goods into the US (New Zealand Gazette, 20 February 1919, p.432)

  • all goods imported into the US must be consigned to trade organisations

1919 – 5 May
Export of kauri-gum to the USA (New Zealand Gazette, 8 May 1919, p.1319)

  • USA will take all gum without export licenses

1919 – 28 May
Exportation from India of linseed, linseed-oil, and castor-oil (New Zealand Gazette, 29 May 1919, p.1602)

  • India will now consider imports of these from NZ

Workplace rules and requisitions for war production

1914 – 20 August
Suspending certain statutory and other provisions prohibiting the employment of workers for extended hours (New Zealand Gazette, 20 August 1914, p.3214)

  • s25 of Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914 allows Governor to suspend any award or industrial agreement
  • Inspector of Factories may permit workers to work on holidays, half-holidays, or beyond usual working hours to manufacture goods which are urgently required for war purposes

1914 – 7 September
Suspending certain provisions of the New Zealand Typographers’ Award (New Zealand Gazette, 10 September 1914, pp.3495-6)

  • Governor suspends provisions of Typographers’ Award of 21 October 1912 (Book of Awards, Vol. XIII, p.721) converting the payment of journeymen and apprentices from a weekly wage to hours actually worked

1914 – 19 October
Suspending certain provisions of the Auckland Grocers’ Assistants and Drivers Awards (New Zealand Gazette, 22 October 1914, p.3831)

  • from weekly pay to hours worked

1914 – 19 October
Suspending certain provisions of the Wellington District Bookbinders, Paper-rulers, and cutters award (New Zealand Gazette, 29 October 1914, p.3878)

1915 – 1 October
Factories Amendment Act 1915

  • amending s20 of the Factories Act 1908
  • regulates the hours of employment of women and boys woollen mills

1915 – 11 October
War Regulations Amendment (No. 2) Act 1915

  • the Minister of Defence may requisition any military supplies from the owner or occupier of any factory or workshop which may be adapted to the manufacture of military supplies (s3)
  • they’ll then be legally obliged to deliver (s4); price to be determined by arbitration (s5); penalty for failure to deliver (s6); Minister may take possession of factory in event of refusal (s7) and the owner penalised for refusal (s8)

1916 – 31 January
Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914 (Section 25) – suspending the provisions of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act 1908 and its amendments, and all awards and industrial agreements preventing or restricting the employment of discharged soldiers (New Zealand Gazette, 10 February 1916, p.449)

  • Inspector of Factories may direct that discharged soldiers may be employed in an industry on the wages and conditions the Inspector deems appropriate

1917 – 28 May
Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914 (Section 25) – modifying the provisions of all awards and industrial agreements in so far as they prevent or restrict the employment of apprentices (New Zealand Gazette, 28 May 1917, pp.2173-4)

  • employers may employ a new apprentice in lieu of one who joins the NZEF

1917 – 3 December
The Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914 (section 25) – suspending the provisions of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act 1908, and its amendments, and of all awards and industrial agreements in so far as they prevent or restrict the training and employment of discharged soldiers in certain industries (New Zealand Gazette, 4 December 1917, pp.4439-4440)

  • revokes order in council of 31 January 1917
  • new provisions

1920 – 8 March
Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

  • Factories Amendment Act 1915 repealed 6 months after the end of the war

Trading with the enemy

See also Banned and permitted exports

1914 – 4 August
Prohibiting the export of coal under certain circumstances (New Zealand Gazette, 4 August 1914, p.3041)

  • export of coal banned under s47 of the Customs Act 1913, except where the Minister of Defence is sure that the coal is to be used by His Majesty’s ships and not a foreign ship of war

1914 – 7 August
Proclamation setting forth the law and policy with regard to trading with the enemy (New Zealand Gazette, 7 August 1914, pp.3093-4, 3175)

  • King’s proclamation instructing that trade with enemy countries be stopped
  • detail of regulations expanded (New Zealand Gazette, 15 September 1914, pp.3547-9)

1914 – 8 August
Prohibiting the export of certain specified goods to specified parts of Europe (New Zealand Gazette, 8 August 1914, pp.3111-2)

  • metals and chemicals, camp equipment, telegraph cables, guns and munitions, steam vessels etc could not be exported to foreign ports in Europe and on the Baltic and Mediterranean Sea, except those of France, Russia (except the Baltic ports), Spain, and Portugal
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 2 November
Trading with the Enemy Act 1914

  • repeals ‘Illegal Trading with the Enemy’ section of Regulation of Trade and Commerce Act 1914
  • prohibits trading or assisting trade with the enemy, punishable by a maximum prison term of 5 years or a fine of up to £1000
  • outlined by proclamation made by His Majesty on 9 September 1914 called the Trading with the Enemy Proclamation No. 2 (amended on 8 October 1914)
  • Attorney-General has the power to order the inspection of books and documents
  • Trading with the Enemy Amendment Act 1915 (28 July 1915) extends the Act to cover attempts to trade with the enemy and inciting other people to trade with the enemy; evidence presented doesn’t have to be legally permissible under normal circumstances; offences committed by an employee to be deemed committed by their employer; summary convictions permitted; corporations carrying on business in enemy territory to be deemed an enemy
  • the whole Act repealed by the third schedule of the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919

1914 – 2 November
Prohibiting the export of certain specified goods (under s47 of the Customs Act 1914 and the Trade and Commerce Act 1914) (New Zealand Gazette, 3 November 1914, pp.3932-3)

  • metals and chemicals, aeroplanes, barbed wire, military clothing, guns and ammunition, leather, saddlery and horse shoes, vehicles of all kinds, vessels, warships etc cannot be exported to foreign ports in Europe and on the Baltic and Mediterranean Sea, except those of France, Russia (except the Baltic ports), Spain, and Portugal
  • revoked and replaced 1 April 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

1914 – 16 December
Trading with the enemy – Patents, designs, and trade-mark fees (New Zealand Gazette, 17 December 1914, p.4340)

  • fees payable for registering trade marks in enemy countries and for enemies registering a grant of an English patent

1915 – 26 January
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 January 1915, pp.327-30) [WRA 1919 pp.29-31]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • goods can only be shipped from NZ with a statutory Declaration of Ultimate Destination
  • no goods can be imported into NZ from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Holland, Switzerland, or Italy without a Certificate of Origin signed by a British Consul in the country of export
  • amended 8 March 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 8 March 1915, p.815) limits the need for a certificate of origin to goods exported after 8 March 1915
  • amended August 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 August 1915, p.3039), revokes the need for a certificate of origin for imported carbide of calcium, tar and pitch, strawboard, butter-paper, and manurial salts
  • amended 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, p.1026) omitting Italy from the list of countries requiring certificates of origin
  • amended 13 October 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 October 1916, pp.3283-6) [WRA 1919 pp.79-82]

1915 – 24 February
Relating to trading with the enemy (New Zealand Gazette, 24 February 1915, pp.662-3)

  • Imperial proclamation of banning trading with the enemy extended to cover neutral territory occupied by the enemy

1915 – 1 April
Prohibiting the export of certain goods (New Zealand Gazette, 6 April 1915, pp.1059-61)

  • revokes earlier orders in council relating to prohibiting exports
  • second schedule lists goods which can’t be exported to any destination without permission of Minister of Customs: coal, flour, oatmeal, wheat, oats, forage – these may be exported to Britain from 22 November 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 November 1915, pp.3889-90)
  • third schedule lists goods which can only be exported to UK: frozen mutton and lamb, chilled and frozen beef or veal, rabbits, tinned meats
  • fourth schedule lists goods which can’t be exported to foreign ports in Europe except Belgium, Spain, and Portugal: sausage skins, gum, sulphur, flax, food for men and animals, seeds and nuts, animal and vegetable oils, seeds/clover/grass, bags and sacks, asbestos, copra – extended to include Italy on 23 August 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 August 1915, p.2977)
  • fifth schedule lists goods which can only be exported to Britain and British dominions: wool, hides, barley/linseed/beans/peas, extracts of meat, scheelite, whale oil, petroleum, rubber, copper, graphite, wool cloth and yarns, blankets and horse-rugs, vessels/boats/crafts, contraband of war – flour, oatmeal, wheat, oats, and forage added to list from 22 November 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 November 1915, pp.3889-90)
  • this list and its amendments revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1915 – 4 May
License under Trading with the Enemy Act 1914 – cargo of s.s. Wismar (New Zealand Gazette, 6 May 1915, p.1690)

  • trade with enemy vessel Wismar, in territorial waters of Dutch Indies, permitted in order to recover certain cargo owned by NZ citizens

1915 – 7 June
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914, concerning the import of goods manufactured by enemy countries (New Zealand Gazette, 7 June 1915, pp.2031-2)

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • Collector of Customs can detain imports he suspects to come from enemy countries
  • repealed by regulations of 13 October 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 October 1916, pp.3283-6) [WRA 1919 pp.79-82]

1915 – 14 July
Relating to trading with persons of enemy nationality resident or carrying on business in China, Siam, Persia, or Morocco (New Zealand Gazette, 15 July 1915, pp.2423-4)

  • Imperial proclamation dated 25 June 1915
  • trading shall cease on 26 July 1915 with people of enemy nationality residing in named countries

1915 – 10 August
Goods imported from Belgium and certain neutral countries in Europe (New Zealand Gazette, 12 August 1915, pp.2886-7)

  • intended to establish a uniform procedure for importing goods from Holland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, and Belgium
  • rules around transhipment, paperwork etc

1915 – 19 November
Relating to trading with persons of enemy nationality resident in or carrying on business in Liberia of Portugese East Africa (New Zealand Gazette, 19 November 1915, p.3873)

  • Imperial proclamation dated 10 November 1915

1915 – 6 December
Prohibiting the exportation of all articles to the Netherlands (New Zealand Gazette, 7 December 1915, p.3985)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1915 – 13 December
Prohibiting the exportation of all articles to China and Siam (New Zealand Gazette, 13 December 1915, p.4032)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 1 March
Prohibiting the exportation of all articles to Switzerland (New Zealand Gazette, 1 March 1916, p.625)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

1916 – 10 April
Prohibiting the export of certain goods (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1916, pp.1023-6)

  • revokes April 1915 to March 1916 gazette notices
  • second schedule – goods which can’t be exported except with the permission of the Minister of Customs: coal, sheep, cattle, scheelite, hides, leather, unset diamonds
  • third schedule – can only be sent to the UK: frozen meat, tallow, wool and sheep skins, copra, oleaginous seeds/nuts/kernels
  • fourth schedule – can only be sent to UK or Australia: hides less than 45lb in weight, calf-skins
  • fifth schedule – goods can be sent to UK or other British possessions and protectorates: sheep skins, barley/linseed/beans/peas, flour/oatmeal/wheat/oats, forage, extracts of meat, whale oil, petroleum, rubber, copper, graphite, wool cloth/yarns etc, blankets and horse rugs, vessels/boats, sausage skins, gum, flax, food for humans, seeds/clover/grass, bags and sacks, asbestos, pepper, capsicums, war contraband
  • sixth schedules: goods can only be sent to the following countries: UK/British possessions, France, Japan, USA, Argentine, Brazil, Uruguay, Pacific Islands
  • veal can be exported from 21 May 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 22 May 1919, p.1490)
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1916 – 24 July
Trading with enemies – license by Attorney-General (New Zealand Gazette, 24 July 1916, p.2485)

  • New Zealand companies may conclude unfinished deals with foreign countries

1916 – 26 September
Prohibiting the importation of goods manufactured or produced in enemy territory or exported therefrom (New Zealand Gazette, 26 September 1916, p.3121)

  • revoked and replaced 10 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1917, p.1217)
  • amended in relation to Belgium, 6 June 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 7 June 1917, p.2296)
  • amended 3 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1919, p.978)

1916 – 13 October
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 13 October 1916, pp.3283-6) [WRA 1919 pp.79-82]

  • to be read with and deemed part of the regulations of 10 November 1914
  • certificates of origin and interest required for goods imported from Norway, Holland, Sweden, Switzerland, and Denmark
  • certificate of interest required for goods imported from Norway, Holland, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, France, Italy, Russia, Japan, Rumania, Portugal, China, Siam, Hayti, USA, French possessions in the South Pacific
  • shall not apply to goods exported before 15 October 1916, remaining subject to the War Regulations of 26 January 1915 for certificates of origin
  • Customs to detain any goods it’s uncertain about
  • it’s an offence to break contracts entered into with the army
  • amended 20 November 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 20 November 1916, p.3615) [WRA 1919 p.83]
  • certificates of interest no longer required for Hayti, 26 March 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 26 March 1917, p.1053) – revoked 15 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, p.3789)
  • certificates of origin and interest now required for imports from Finland (New Zealand Gazette, 28 November 1918, p.3844) [WRA 1919 p.184] – revoked 15 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, p.3789)
  • certificates of origin and interest now required for imports from Belgium, 8 April 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 April 1919, p,1021) [WRA 1919 p.200] – revoked 15 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, p.3789)
  • regulations 1-12 and the schedules revoked, 15 December 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 18 December 1919, p.3789)

1916 – 18 December
Additional regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, pp.3953-4) [WRA 1919 pp.87-8]

  • war regulations of 3 April 1916 provided that no owner of a British ship in NZ could transfer interests to non-British person – further clarification

1917 – 28 March
Restrictions on enemy commerce (New Zealand Gazette, 28 March 1917, pp.1101-2

  • Imperial proclamation dated 10 January 1917 amending that of 11 March 1915 concerning enemy shipping and attacks on allied shipping

1917 – 11 June
Shipping regulations under the War Regulations Act 1914 and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 11 June 1917, pp.2311-3 [WRA 1919 pp.109-10]

  • intended to control the NZ shipping industry to secure public safety and the efficient conduct of that industry and the industries dependent thereon
  • NZ ships can’t be re-registered elsewhere, sold or mortgaged, chartered, withdrawn from trade, leave NZ without permission from the Minister of Marine
  • extended to ships registered in outside ports but used by any company with its headquarters in NZ, 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 November 1919, pp.3563-4)

1918 – 16 February
Relating to trading with certain persons of enemy nationality interned in neutral countries (New Zealand Gazette, 22 February 1918, p.594)

  • Imperial proclamation dated 27 November 1917
  • bans trade with enemy aliens interned in neutral countries

1918 – 13 August
Russia – Certificate under the Trading with the Enemy (Occupied Territory) Proclamation, dated 16th February 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 August 1918, p.2933)

  • parts of Russia described as occupied territory
  • further notices 5 September 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 12 September 1918, p.3219); 22 October 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 24 October 1918, pp.3591-2)

1916 – 18 September
Prohibiting the exportation of rennet and the importation of foreign soap (New Zealand Gazette, 18 September 1916, p.3036)

  • soap from France permitted as of 6 November 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 6 November 1916, p.3502)
  • soap from Italy and Japan permitted as of 29 January 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 1 February 1917, p.391)
  • revoked 2 December 1918 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 December 1918, p.3879)

1919 – 17 November
Allowing the importation of goods manufactured or produced in Belgium, Northern France, and Alsace-Lorraine (New Zealand Gazette, 17 November 1919, pp.3516-7)

  • revokes notice of 10 April 1917, which prohibited imports from enemy-occupied territory
  • imports still prohibited from Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and Turkey
  • revoked and replaced 26 July 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 29 July 1920, p.2267)

1920 – 26 July
Prohibiting the importation of goods manufactured or produced in or exported from Germany, Austria, or Hungary (New Zealand Gazette, 29 July 1920, p.2267)

  • revokes notice of 17 November 1919
  • refines definitions

Patents, designs, and trade marks

1914 – 27 October
Inventions relating to Arms and Munitions of war, &c (New Zealand Gazette, 5 November 1914, pp.3951-2)

  • Imperial Army Orders reprinted

1914 – 2 November
Patents, Designs, and Trade-marks Amendment Act 1914

  • amends the Patents, Designs, and Trade-marks Act 1911
  • Governor in Council may suspend any patent or license, registration or trade mark, application under the principal Act, etc, until six months following the end of the war
  • Patents, Designs, and Trade-marks Amendment Act 1914 remains in force for six months after the termination of the war (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)
  • repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1914 – 16 December
Trading with the enemy – Patents, designs, and trade-mark fees (New Zealand Gazette, 17 December 1914, p.4340)

  • fees payable for registering trade marks in enemy countries and for enemies registering a grant of an English patent

1916 – 18 December
Order in council under the War Regulations Act and its amendments (New Zealand Gazette, 21 December 1916, p.3891)

  • to come into force 1 January 1917
  • the Registrar of Patents, Designs, and Trade Marks can withhold the publication of any invention or design if it’s desirable to do so on account of the war
  • amended 2 April 1917 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1917, p.1187)
  • revoked 5 March 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 April 1919, p.975)

War funds and finance

See also Banking

1914 – 14 August
Public Revenues Amendment Act 1914

  • amends Public Revenues Act 1910
  • Minister of Finance may borrow £2m on public securities, to be paid into a special account called the ‘War Expenses Account’, and to be spent as the Minister of Defence deems fit for the defence of NZ or any other part of the British empire
  • use of the money extended to providing relief or comfort of distress caused by the war, or for the comfort of sick or wounded soldiers, on 3 July 1915 by s6 of the Public Revenues Amendment Act 1915

1914 – 15 August
War Contributions Validation Act 1914

  • legalises the contribution of money or in kind to the Empire Defence Fund or otherwise in aid of the war (s2)
  • all such contributions will be paid into the War Expenses Account established under the Public Revenues Amendment Act 1914
  • War Contributions Validation (No. 2) Act 1914 extends the use of the funds to relieving distress occasioned by the war, or any patriotic objects approved by the Governor providing the money is paid into an approved fund; saving banks authorised to make contributions; local authorities empowered to make payments to relatives of employees who join the NZEF upon whom they depend
  • the whole Act repealed by the third schedule of the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1919

1915 – 3 July
Public Revenues Amendment Act 1915

  • govt borrowing limit extended from £1m to £2m
  • govt expenditure for railways to not exceed £150,000 and £250,000 for other services in any financial year
  • Minister of Finance authorised to raise £10m for purpose of the war, to be paid into War Expenses Account

1915 – 4 September
Public Revenues Amendment (No. 2) Act 1915

  • money for war purposes may be borrowed from the Imperial Treasury
  • govt borrowing limit extended from £2m to £3m
  • War Loans Sinking Fund created

1915 – 22 September
New Zealand Loans Amendment Act 1915

  • amends NZ Loans Act 1908
  • Minister of Finance may issue debentures with a currency of not less than 25 years, for £5 or multiples of £5

1915 – 1 October
Finance Act 1915

  • rates of land and income tax set (Part I)
  • customs duties amended (preserved fruit, spirits, wines, bicycle/motor cycles and parts, motor vehicles and engines/parts for them, material for manufacturing carts (s24 and second schedule))
  • Governor may introduce a 50% surtax on goods imported from enemy countries (s28) – amended to ‘not more than 50%’ on 5 November 1919 (s19 Finance Act 1919)
  • beer duty introduced
  • stamp duties amended, including horse racing profits
  • death duties amended
  • £2m to be raised for Public Works
  • railway charges increased

1915 – 11 October
War Funds Act 1915

  • constitutes National War Funds Council to administer war funds provided by patriotic societies, to be spent on any purpose approved by the Governor
  • technically amended 7 August 1916 (s36-40 of the War Legislation Amendment Act 1916)
  • amended to allow temporary investment of funds, and making it an offence to collect funds without authorisation (s32-22 of the War Legislation Act 1917)
  • use of war funds extended to include the acquisition of recreation grounds in commemoration of the services rendered by the military forces during the war on 31 October 1917 (s31 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918)
  • moneys may be invested temporarily; unauthorised people may not collect war funds, from 31 October 1917 (s32-33 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918)
  • Supreme Court may establish schemes of administration of war funds as of 10 December 1918 (War Funds Amendment Act 1918)
  • amended 22 September 1924 so that National War Funds Council becomes a body corporate and about its activities (War Funds Amendment Act 1924)
  • amended 21 September 1927 to extend definition of ‘war funds’, to authorise the transfer of unexpended war funds to the National War Funds Council, to authorise the transfer of the Christchurch RSA to the National War Funds Council (War Funds Amendment Act 1927)

1915 – 12 October
Gaming Amendment Act

  • amends the Gaming Act 1908
  • Minister of Internal Affairs may authorise any person to raffle any personal property to benefit war funds
  • to be repealed immediately on the termination of the war with Germany
  • Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4) confirms the expiry on 10 January 1920
  • repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 8 May
Regulations under the War Funds Act 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 11 May 1916, pp.1685-8)

1916 – 7 August
Finance Act 1916

  • rates of land and income tax set for the year – land tax increased by 50% and income tax by 33 1/3% (Part I)
  • excess-profits duty introduced (Part II)
  • Minister has the power to borrow £16m
  • provision to issue war loan certificates – amends NZ Loans Amendment Act 1915

1917 – 9 August
War Purposes Loan Act 1917

  • Minister of Finance empowered to borrow £24m subject to the NZ Loans Empowerment Act 1915
  • can issue war loan certificates
  • increased to £28m on 27 October 1917 by the War Purposes Loan (No. 2) Act 1917

1917 – 15 September
Finance Act 1917

  • land and income taxes introduced (Part I)
  • special war tax payable in addition to income tax (s39)
  • people earning more than £700pa subject to compulsory subscriptions to the war-purposes loan described in the War Purpose Loan Act 1917 (s40)
  • new customs duties introduced on perfume, toilet preparations, culinary and flavouring essences, medical preparations more than 50% proof; beer duty, tobacco (Part II)
  • ‘amusements tax’ introduced for tickets to places of entertainment (Part III); exemptions listed 15 April 1918 (s8-9 of Finance Act 1918); amended 22 December 1921 (by s14 of the Finance (No. 2) Act 1921); continued by Amusements-tax Act 1922 (17 October 1922)
  • war loan certificates may be acquired on time payments, may bear interest at 5%, may be exchanged for Post Office War Bonds, etc (Part IV)
  • trustees empowered to raise money on security of trust estate, and to invest proceeds in loan for war purposes (s70) – continued until 31 August 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920 (28 August 1920)
  • s70 continued until 31 December 1922 by the Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1921-22 (11 February 1922)

1918 – 15 April
Finance Act 1918

  • extends annual appropriations until 31 December 1918 (repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920)
  • land tax: shall be assessed and levied pursuant to Part I of the Finance Act 1917, at rates specified in the schedule to this Act (s6)
  • special war tax: levied at rates fixed in schedule, not to exceed £300 (s7)
  • amusements-tax: lists exemptions under the scheme outlined in the Finance Act 1917 (s8-9)
  • Minister of Finance authorised to raise a loan of £20m (s10)
  • Minister may issue war-loan certificates to raise a war-purposes loan (s11)
  • terms of issue (s12-13)

1918 – 10 December
Finance (No. 2) Act 1918

  • War Expenses Account established by the Public Revenues Amendment Act 1914 to continue (s2)
  • War Expenses Account to be credited with all money currently in it and flowing in from other Acts, received from the Crown from the sale of property, all gifts or voluntary contributions from the war (s3)
  • money in the account to be used for carrying on the war, to relieve distress caused by the war within NZ or elsewhere; for the establishment of hospitals, sanatoria, and other institutions for the treatment of the wounded from the war; for the maintenance of the NZEF between the end of the war and the disbandment of the forces; for the return of the troops to NZ; for the administration of Samoa; for the maintenance and repatriation of prisoners of war; for the restoration of conditions appropriate to a state of peace; for the redemption of Reserve Fund securities; for any other purposes enacted (s4)
  • amendment of stamp duty rules (Part II)
  • insurance companies exempt from Land and Income Tax (Part III)
  • Minister of Finance empowered to borrow £10m to be placed in War Expenses Account (s23)
  • Postmaster General may issue war-loan certificates to raise money (s24-28)
  • Minister of Finance may borrow £2.5m for Public Works (s29)
  • Minister of Finance may borrow to expand cold storage (s30)
  • Minister of Finance may borrow £1m for Discharged Soldiers Settlement, as permitted by s8 of the Discharged Soldiers Settlement Act 1915 and amended by s82 of the Finance Act 1917 (s31)
  • £200,000 to be borrowed for afforestation (s32)
  • money borrowed under the NZ Loans Act 1908 (s33)

1920 – 11 November
Finance Act 1920

  • all the money in the War Expenses Account to be expended pursuant to appropriation by Parliament, rather than s4 of the Finance (No. 2) Act 1918, s7 of the Expeditionary Forces Amendment Act 1918, or s11 of the Repatriation Act 1918 (s20)
  • Minister of Defence may appoint boards to manage regimental or canteen funds (s21)
  • bonus payments for wool requisitioned by the UK government to be distributed amongst producers (s22)
  • Minister of Finance may guarantee loans made by banks to discharged soldiers (s24)

Banking and trust funds

1914 – 5 August
Banking Amendment Act 1914

  • amends Banking Act 1908
  • Governor in Council may proclaim bank notes from any bank to be legal tender during the duration of the proclamation
  • amended on 7 August 1914 so that gold exported in breach of the Banking Amendment Act 1914 will be forfeited to the Crown (Banking Amendment (No. 2) Act 1914)
  • prohibition on exporting gold repealed 5 November 1919 (s3 of the Finance Act 1919)

1914 – 5 August
Declaring notes of certain banks to be legal tender (New Zealand Gazette, 5 August 1914, pp.6043-4)

  • bank notes from the Bank of New Zealand, the National Bank of NZ, the Union Bank of Australia, the Bank of Australasia, the Bank of New South Wales, the Commercial Bank of Australia declared legal tender from 6 August 1914 until 6 September 1914
  • extended to 7 October 1914 on 4 September (New Zealand Gazette, 4 September 1914, pp.3485-6)
  • extended to 7 January 1915 on 5 October 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 5 October 1914, pp.3693-4)
  • extended to 7 April 1915 on 17 December 1914 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 December 1914, p.4364)
  • extended to 6 August 1915 on 15 March 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 15 March 1915, pp.879-80)
  • extended to 6 November 1915 on 12 July 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 13 July 1915, pp.2341-2)
  • extended to 6 February 1916 on 26 October 1915 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 October 1915, pp.3599-600)
  • extended to 30 June 1916 on 17 January 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 17 January 1916, pp.121-2)
  • extended to 31 December 1916 on 26 June 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 June 1916, pp.2129-30)
  • further extension notices: 1916 p.3879; 1917 pp.232, 2315, 4440; 1918 pp.1115

1914 – 15 August
Trustee Amendment Act 1914

  • authorises the deposit of trust-moneys with certain approved institutions for a period not exceeding 12 months
  • the Courts to take judicial notice of the existence of a state of war
  • to continue until 31 December 1915 (extended by Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1916)
  • whole Act repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1914 – 27 October
National Provident Fund Amendment (No. 2) Act 1914

  • contributions of NZEF members to National Provident Fund to be protected
  • repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1916 – 7 August
Finance Act 1916

  • Governor in Council may make regulations about suspending, altering, varying the terms, conditions or restrictions relating to bank notes; for altering the amount of the reserve of coin, bullion, and public securities required to be held in NZ by any bank against debts, engagements and liabilities of such bank; providing that ten shilling bank notes may be issued – to be considered in relation to the present war (s44) – extended to include 5 shilling notes on 10 December 1918 (s34 of the Finance (No. 2) Act 1918)
  • may also make provisions for regulating or restricting the investment of moneys beyond NZ; regulate the rates of interest to be paid on money invested in NZ (s45)
  • shall continue for twelve months after the war (s48) (s66 of the Finance Act 1917 extends the provisions of s44 of the 1916 Act to a date to be fixed by Order in Council not earlier than 5 years after the expiry of the present war)
  • s45-47 of the Finance Act 1916 remained in force during the war and for twelve months after (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

1916 – 10 August
Regulations under section 44 of the Finance Act 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 10 August 1916, p.2679)

  • banks empowered to issue ten shilling notes

1916 – 21 August
Additional regulations under section 44 of the Finance Act 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 21 August 1916, pp.2807-8)

  • these regulations set a maximum amount for bank-notes issued or reissued in NZ, substituting any limit set by earlier regulations under the Banking Act 1908
  • Minister of Finance may extend a bank’s limit when satisfied that public (ie government) securities held by a bank in the UK have been hypothecated to the Crown under the Banking Amendment Act 1914
  • limits on the issue of banknotes provided by s2(2) of the regulations suspended

1917 – 15 September
Finance Act 1917

  • introduces a duty on gold held by banks in NZ on behalf of the Imperial Government (repealed 22 March 1921 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1921)
  • to remain in force for six months after the war
  • banks authorised to carry securities other than public securities (s66)

1918 – 21 May
War regulations – restricting remittances of money from New Zealand (New Zealand Gazette, 28 May 1918, pp.2063-4) [WRA 1919 pp.147-8]

  • intended to stem the outwards flow of cash from New Zealand in the interests of protecting the war effort
  • no-one can send a sum exceeding £1000 out of the country
  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 25 November 1919, p.3563)

1918 – 17 December
Prohibiting the exportation of Russian rouble notes (New Zealand Gazette, 19 December 1918, pp.4024-5)

  • revoked 24 November 1919 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 November 1919, p.3573)

1919 – 14 April
Prohibiting the importation of Russian rouble notes (New Zealand Gazette, 24 April 1919, p.1174)

1919 – 15 December
Prohibiting the exportation of coined silver (New Zealand Gazette, 8 January 1920, p.39)

1919 – 23 December
Prohibiting the exportation from New Zealand of silver (New Zealand Gazette, 9 January 1920, p.151)

1920 – 8 March
Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on 10th January 1920 (New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

  • issue of debentures in payment for land taken from the Crown under s44 of the Finance Act 1916 to continue for 12 months after the war
  • Banking Amendment Act 1914 not affected by termination of war. Proclamation has been issued declaring notes to be legal tender until 31st December 1922
  • s45-47 of the Finance Act 1916

Miscellaneous

Use of the word ‘Anzac’

1916 – 7 August
War Legislation Amendment Act 1916

  • governor may restrict the use of certain words relating to the war for the purpose of trade of business (s33)

1916 – 29 August
Use of the word ‘Anzac’ restricted under the War Legislation Amendment Act 1916 (New Zealand Gazette, 31 August 1913, pp.2893-4)

  • use of the word ‘Anzac’ prohibited by any trade or business

British property in enemy territory

1917 – March
French Commission appointed to deal with private interest of the allies in enemy or enemy-occupied territory – apply to the French Vice-Consul at Auckland for more information (New Zealand Gazette, 22 March 1917, p.1034)

1919 – 19 March
Claims by British subjects to property in Russia (New Zealand Gazette, 20 March 1919, p.819)

  • Public Trustee will forward claims to the Foreign Claims Office in London

Mining

1914 – 5 November
Mining Amendment Act 1914

  • restricting the use of winding ropes in mines (s7(24A))
  • amended by s24 of the War Legislation Act 1917
  • extended to expire six months after the war (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)
  • repealed on 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

Ammunition and explosives

1914 – 27 July
Regulations under the Explosive and Dangerous Goods Act 1908 (New Zealand Gazette, 27 July 1914, pp.2922-41)

  • explosives defined and classified
  • the rules around importing and conveying explosives
  • rules around manufacturing, storage, sale, and inspection of explosives

1921 – 27 September
Revoking war regulations relating to firearms, ammunition, and explosives (New Zealand Gazette, 29 September 1921, p.2422)

  • revokes regulations 5-12(b) relating to firearms, explosives, and ammunition as set out in s2 of the Second Schedule of the War Regulations Continuance Act 1920

Cook Islands and Western Samoa

1917 – 9 July
Extension of War Regulations to Cook Islands (New Zealand Gazette, 9 July 1917, pp.2763-4) [WRA 1919 pp.113-4]

  • War Regulations acts prescribe that the war regulations won’t apply to the Cook Islands except where specifically stated – these regulations apply the war regulations about seditious statements and inciting lawlessness to the Cook Islands from 25 July 1917

1917 – 15 October
War regulations for the Cook Islands (New Zealand Gazette, 15 October 1917, p.3915) [WRA 1919 pp.121-2]

  • under Cook Islands Act 1915, any alien enemy in the Cook Islands may be arrested and deported to NZ

1919 – 17 November
Prohibiting the export of intoxicating liquor to Western Samoa (New Zealand Gazette, 17 November 1919, p.3483)

Old age pensions

1917 – 15 September
Finance Act 1917

  • old age pensions and other pensions temporarily increased until twelve months after the end of the war (s83-4)
  • still in force in March 1920 (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

Local bodies

1916 – 7 August
War Legislation Amendment Act 1916

  • local bodies may claim back expenses of assisting the local Recruiting Board with recruiting (s24)
  • local bodies may pay the life insurance premiums of its employees in the NZEF as per s3 of the Local Authorities Empowering Act 1915 (s25) - s25 repealed 28 August 1920 by the Statutes Repeal and Expiring Laws Amendment and Continuance Act 1920

1917 – 31 October
War Legislation Act 1917

  • local authorities may borrow money to fund public works which will provide employment for discharged soldiers (with the special permission of the Governor-in-Council)
  • loan authority from taxpayers not to expire until two years after the war
  • similar provisions in s22-3 of the War Legislation and Statute Law Amendment Act 1918
  • still in power March 1920 (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)

1918 – 15 April
Finance Act 1918

  • no local authority shall be obliged to repay any loan so long as the war continues – they shall become payable 12 months after the termination of the war
  • term of loan may be extended beyond twelve months (Effect on war legislation of the termination of the war on the 10th January 1920, New Zealand Gazette, 9 March 1920, pp.783-4)
  • continued until 31 December 1922 by the Expiring Laws Continuance Act 1921-22 (11 February 1922)

War-related gazette notices not indexed

Patriotic societies (in War, European)
Promotion of officers in NZEF (in Defence)
War Expenses Account (in Public Accounts)
Contraband of war (in War, European)
Land set aside under Discharged Soldier Settlement Act
Notices relating to Mariners
Post-war regulations concerning the cutting of standing timber (under war regulations)

How to cite this page

'Index of wartime laws and regulations, 1914-21', URL: https://nzhistory.govt.nz/war/index-wartime-laws-and-regulations-1914-21, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage), updated 20-Apr-2015