sesquicentenary

Articles

Centennial - growth of New Zealand identity

  • Centennial - growth of New Zealand identity

    Between 8 November 1939 and 4 May 1940 more than 2.6 million people visited the New Zealand Centennial Exhibition in Wellington; this represents an average daily attendance of about 17,000 people. The government spent £250,000 – more than $19 million in today's money – on the exhibition.

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  • Page 1 - The 1940 Centennial Between 8 November 1939 and 4 May 1940 more than 2.6 million people visited the New Zealand Centennial Exhibition in Wellington; this represents an average daily attendance

Housing the Prime Minister

  • Housing the Prime Minister

    Almost 150 years after the government purchased the first official premier's residence on Tinakori Road, Wellington, the address of Premier House remains the same. But in the intervening years the building has been extended, renamed, abandoned and refurbished.

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  • Page 4 – Vogel House and Premier House

    Since 1975 the official prime minister's residence has been at Vogel House and, since 1990, Premier House

Treaty timeline

Waitangi Day

  • Waitangi Day

    Every year on 6 February, New Zealand marks the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. For most people, Waitangi Day is a holiday; for many, and especially for Māori, it is a time for reflecting on the Treaty and its place in modern New Zealand.

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  • Page 7 - Waitangi Day 1990sIn the 1990s Waitangi Day events became a focus for protests about

Flags of New Zealand

  • Flags of New Zealand

    The New Zealand flag hasn't always been our official flag. It was adopted in 1902, replacing the Union Jack. Between 1834 and 1840, the flag of the United Tribes was recognised as our first 'national' flag. Waitangi Day 2010 saw the first official recognition of the national Māori flag.

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  • Page 6 - The national Māori flagA history of the national Māori (Tino Rangatiratanga)