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Economy

Events In History

1 April 1987

The State-owned Enterprises Act heralded a major overhaul of the public sector and was a key part of the strategy of economic liberalisation known as 'Rogernomics'.

1 October 1986

Adding 10 per cent to the cost of most goods and services, GST was a key part of the economic reforms of the fourth Labour government – dubbed ‘Rogernomics’ after Minister of Finance Roger Douglas.

28 March 1983

New Zealand and Australia formally signed the Closer Economic Relations (CER) agreement, strengthening trade ties between the Tasman neighbours.

30 July 1979

Carless days for motor vehicles were introduced to combat the second ‘oil shock’ (petrol shortage) of the 1970s. They did little to reduce consumption and were scrapped in May 1980.

10 July 1967

Pounds, shillings and pence were replaced by dollars and cents − 27 million new banknotes and 165 million new coins.

15 February 1882

New Zealand’s first successful shipment of frozen meat to Britain in 1882 had a huge impact on the colony, paving the way for the trade in frozen meat and dairy products that became the cornerstone of New Zealand’s 20th-century economy.

21 January 1859

Enjoying a cold drink on a hot afternoon was not always as simple as adding ice from the freezer to water from the refrigerator. At one time the ice made a much longer journey.

Articles

US Forces in New Zealand

The first American soldiers landed on New Zealand soil in June 1942, beginning an 'invasion' which would have a profound impact on both visitors and hosts over the next 18 months. Read the full article

Page 8 - Economic impact

The presence of thousands of well-paid Americans in New Zealand as part of a large army which needed provisioning sparked a minor economic boom that had some long-term effects on

The Merchant Navy

3 September is Merchant Navy Day, which was first officially commemorated in New Zealand in 2010. The date marks the sinking of the first Allied merchant ship in 1939, just hours after the Second World War began. This is the story of the 'fourth service' at war. Read the full article

Page 2 - The longest lifeline

An island nation half a world away from its main trading partner, New Zealand in the mid-20th century was overwhelmingly dependent on sea transport for its prosperity and

Page 3 - Under the Southern Cross

New Zealand's domestic shipping industry played a vital role during the war. A small tributary of the vast British shipping empire, it was largely confined to 'short-sea'

Korean War

New Zealand was involved militarily in Korea from 1950 to 1957, first as part of the United Nations 'police action' to repel North Korea's invasion of its southern neighbour, and then in a garrison role after the armistice in July 1953. Read the full article

Page 1 - New Zealand in the Korean War

New Zealand was involved militarily in Korea from 1950 to 1957, first as part of the United Nations 'police action' to repel North Korea's invasion of its southern neighbour, and

Dominion status

On 26 September 1907 the colony of New Zealand ceased to exist. It became, instead, a dominion within the British Empire. Read the full article

Page 6 - New Zealand in 1907

What was New Zealand like when it became a

The 1960s

Five decades ago most Kiwis enjoyed a standard of living that was the envy of other nations. During the 1960s the arrival of TV and jet airliners shrank our world, and New Zealanders began to express themselves on a range of international issues, including opposition to the Vietnam War. Read the full article

Page 2 - Overview

Summary of what NZ was like in the 1960s, including our population, economy, popular culture, sporting achievements and

Page 10 - 1967 - key events

A selection of the key events in New Zealand history from

Pacific aftermath

Participation in the First World War changed Pacific Islanders' lives. Returning servicemen had seen the world. Read the full article

Page 5 - Economic, social and political impact

The First World War opened the Pacific Islands to the world more than they ever had been

Container shipping

Forty-five years ago, on 19 June 1971, the first all-container ship to visit New Zealand arrived in Wellington. Columbus New Zealand was part of a worldwide revolution in shipping. These simple steel boxes would change our transport industry, our ports and how we work and shop. Read the full article

Page 5 - Transforming our economy

Containers changed everything. Railways ordered fleets of flat-deck rolling stock and ‘daylighted’ tiny Victorian tunnels so they could get through. Truckers bought heavy-duty

The Vogel era

In 1870, Colonial Treasurer Julius Vogel launched the most ambitious development programme in New Zealand’s history. The ‘Vogel era’ was a decisive moment in New Zealand’s 19th-century transformation from a Māori world to a Pākehā one. Read the full article

Page 1 - The Vogel era

In 1870, Colonial Treasurer Julius Vogel launched the most ambitious development programme in New Zealand’s history. The ‘Vogel era’ was a decisive moment in New Zealand’s

Page 2 - New Zealand in 1870

Three decades after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand’s two main islands were like two different

Page 3 - Vogel's vision

In June 1870, Vogel unveiled the most ambitious public works and assisted-immigration programme in New Zealand’s

Page 4 - Building Vogel's railways

Julius Vogel wasn’t the first colonial politician to promise to fund public works and immigration with borrowed money. But the early 1870s offered better prospects for

Page 5 - Vogel's legacy

After the initial enthusiasm of the 1870s, Julius Vogel’s reputation suffered in the 1880s when New Zealand’s economy slumped into a long depression that was triggered by an

The 1970s

The 1970s were an era of economic and social change. Global oil shocks hit the New Zealand economy hard, while protests against the Vietnam War and nuclear testing continued. A new generation of activists raised questions about race relations, sexuality and the welfare system in New Zealand. Read the full article

Page 2 - Overview

Summary of what NZ was like in the 1970s, including our population, economy, popular culture, protest issues, politics and sporting

The New Zealand Legion

The year 1933 witnessed an unprecedented eruption of protest amongst urban businessmen and professionals in New Zealand. The most prominent manifestation of this protest was a radical conservative movement named the New Zealand Legion. Read the full article

Page 2 - Origins

The Wall Street Crash of October 1929 is generally recognised as the event that triggered the Great Depression. In New Zealand, the effects of the crash were not immediately

Page 3 - The desire to 'do something'

The New Zealand Legion was much more than a conservative protest against the coalition government. It was the focal point for a wide range of individuals, overwhelmingly from the

Page 5 - Ideology

While the New Zealand Legion’s initial policy was deliberately vague, it contained several key elements that were central to the movement’s ideology throughout its

Page 6 - Internal conflicts

Because the New Zealand Legion was such a catch-all movement for various ideas and grievances, it was inevitable that its inherent contradictions would

Page 7 - Decline

Internal divisions and resignations over policy had considerably sapped the New Zealand Legion’s strength by the beginning of

Feeding Britain

From March 1915 the British government purchased New Zealand’s entire output of frozen meat to help ensure a regular flow of food to the British public and the British Expeditionary Force in France and Belgium. Read the full article

Page 1 - Feeding Britain

From March 1915 the British government purchased New Zealand’s entire output of frozen meat to help ensure a regular flow of food to the British public and the British