Skip to main content

WW1

Events In History

28 June 1919

Bill Massey’s was the 17th signature on the treaty, the implementation of which formally ended the war between the Allies and Germany.

15 March 1919

Four months after the end of the First World War, hundreds of New Zealand soldiers rioted at Sling Camp on Salisbury Plain in southern England. It was the most serious breakdown of discipline in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in the European theatre.

10 December 1918

About 40 male Arab civilians were killed by Anzac troops in revenge for the death of New Zealand Trooper Leslie Lowry.

4 November 1918

By early November 1918 Germany stood alone against the Allies and revolution was breaking out behind the lines. But the German army was still resisting on the Western Front, and the New Zealanders’ capture of the walled northern French town of Le Quesnoy was a bold feat of arms.

26 June 1918

The steamer Wimmera, bound from Auckland to Sydney, struck a mine laid north of Cape Maria van Diemen in 1917 by the German raider Wolf. Twenty-six of its 151 passengers and crew were lost.

31 October 1917

The New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade played a key part in the capture of Beersheba, a turning point in the struggle for the Middle East in the First World War

7 October 1917

Felix Graf von Luckner earned the epithet Der Seeteufel (the Sea Devil) for his exploits as captain of the German raider SMS Seeadler in 1916–17.

24 September 1917

Ten New Zealand soldiers were killed when they were hit by a train at Bere Ferrers in southern England. The accident occurred as troops from the 28th Reinforcements for the NZ Expeditionary Force were being transported from Plymouth to Sling Camp on Salisbury Plain.

7 June 1917

The Battle of Messines was a prelude to the much larger Third Battle of Ypres, better known as Passchendaele. New Zealanders played a prominent role in the successful action at Messines but paid a heavy price: 3700 casualties, including 700 dead.

2 June 1917

The steamer Wairuna, en route from Auckland to San Francisco, was captured by the German raider Wolf and later sunk near the Kermadec Islands. The crew of 42 was taken prisoner.

25 August 1916

After being found guilty of desertion, 28-year-old Private Frank Hughes was killed by a firing squad in Hallencourt, northern France. He was the first New Zealand soldier executed during the First World War.

31 May 1916

In the misty North Sea on the last day of May 1916, 250 warships from Britain’s Royal Navy and Germany’s High Seas Fleet clashed in the First World War’s greatest and bloodiest sea battle.

11 April 1916

The Minnewaska, a troopship carrying the headquarters of the recently formed New Zealand Division, arrived in Marseilles, France

1 March 1916

After the evacuation from Gallipoli in December 1915, New Zealand troops returned to Egypt to recover and regroup. In February 1916, it was decided that Australian and New Zealand infantry divisions would be sent to the Western Front. On 1 March, the New Zealand Division was formed.

15 December 1915

In a well-planned operation which contrasted sharply with those mounted earlier in the Gallipoli campaign, Allied troops were successfully withdrawn from Anzac Cove and Suvla Bay between 15 and 20 December.

23 October 1915

The sinking of the transport ship Marquette in the Aegean Sea in late 1915 added to the grief of a nation still reeling from the heavy losses at Gallipoli.

21 August 1915

Hill 60 was the last offensive action fought by the New Zealanders during the Gallipoli campaign. The ‘abominable little hill’, as it was dubbed by Brigadier-General Andrew Russell, saw bitter fighting between New Zealand and Ottoman troops in late August 1915.

8 August 1915

The high point of the New Zealand effort at Gallipoli, the capture of Chunuk Bair underlined the leadership qualities of Lieutenant-Colonel William Malone.

9 May 1915

New Zealand's most successful tennis player, Anthony Wilding was one of the stars of the sport in the decade before the First World War.

2 April 1915

Up to 2500 New Zealand and Australian troops rioted in the Haret Al Wassir red-light district of Cairo's Ezbekieh Quarter.

8 February 1915

Able Seaman William Edward Knowles became one of the first New Zealanders to die in the First World War as a result of enemy action.

16 October 1914

Thousands of Wellingtonians rose before dawn and crowded vantage points around the harbour to watch as 10 grey-painted troopships, escorted by four warships, sailed to war.

29 August 1914

Colonel Robert Logan led a 1400-strong expeditionary force to capture German Samoa in New Zealand’s first military action of the First World War. This was the second German territory, after Togoland in West Africa, to fall to the Allies in the war.

5 August 1914

New Zealand received the news of the outbreak of war just before 1 p.m. on 5 August. At 3 p.m. the Governor, Lord Liverpool, announced the news from the steps of Parliament to a large and enthusiastic crowd.

28 June 1914
The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914 eventually led to the outbreak of the First World War.

Articles

Anzac Day

First observed in 1916, Anzac Day - 25 April - commemorates those killed in war and honours returned servicemen and women. The ceremonies held at war memorials around the country, and in places overseas where New Zealanders gather, are rich in tradition and ritual. Read the full article

Page 2 - The Anzacs

The word Anzac is part of the culture of New Zealanders and Australians. The word conjures up a shared heritage of two nations, but it also has a specific meaning, dating from

Links - military history

Links to military resources  including personnel records, medal winners and war graves.  Read the full article

Page 3 - First World War

Recommended links for researching New Zealand and the First World

New Zealand and Le Quesnoy

It was the New Zealand Division's final action of the First World War. On 4 November 1918, just a week before the Armistice was signed, New Zealand troops stormed the walled French town of Le Quesnoy. The 90 men killed were among the last of the 12,483 who fell on the Western Front. Read the full article

Page 1 - New Zealand and Le Quesnoy

It was the New Zealand Division's final action of the First World War. On 4 November 1918, just a week before the Armistice was signed, New Zealand troops stormed the walled

Page 2 - The liberation of Le Quesnoy

The capture of the French town of Le Quesnoy by the New Zealand Division on 4 November 1918 has special significance in New Zealand's military

Page 3 - Visiting Le Quesnoy

Just 4 kilometres east of Beaudignies in northern France is Le Quesnoy. This town was in German hands for almost all of the First World War, from August 1914, until the New

Page 4 - Battle accounts, Lieutenant Averill

Leslie Cecil Lloyd Averill is best remembered for his exploits during the liberation of Le Quesnoy on 4 November

Page 5 - Battle accounts, Private Nimmo

Captain James Matheson Nimmo joined 3rd Battalion, 3rd New Zealand (Rifle) Brigade on 27 September

First World War memorials

The New Zealand war memorials of the First World War have become part of the common fabric of our lives, like stop signs or lamp-posts. Virtually every township in the country has one, usually in the main street. Read the full article

Page 1 - Interpreting First World War memorials

The New Zealand war memorials of the First World War have become part of the common fabric of our lives, like stop signs or lamp-posts. Virtually every township in the country has

Page 3 - Further information

Links and books relating to New Zealand's First World War

Food in the 20th century

The pavlova - that frothy, baked confection of egg whites and sugar - has long been seen as an icon of New Zealand cuisine; its place of origin has been debated with Australians for just as long in one of the many instances of trans-Tasman rivalry. Read the full article

Page 4 - Tea and coffee break

Tea was a 'great mainstay' of 'thirsty colonial New Zealand', the food historian Tony Simpson

Page 5 - Fruit and vegetables

A house and garden on a patch of land were part of the 'New Zealand dream' for most of the 20th

The Gallipoli campaign

Each year on Anzac Day, New Zealanders (and Australians) mark the anniversary of the Gallipoli landings of 25 April 1915. On that day, thousands of young men, far from their homes, stormed the beaches on the Gallipoli Peninsula in what is now Türkiye. Read the full article

Page 1 - The Gallipoli campaign

Each year on Anzac Day, New Zealanders (and Australians) mark the anniversary of the Gallipoli landings of 25 April 1915. On that day, thousands of young men, far from their

Page 2 - Gallipoli in brief

The Ottoman Empire entered the war on the side of the Central Powers. New Zealand and Australian troops supported British and French soldiers in an attempt to capture the

Page 3 - Invasion

Allied forces landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula on 25 April 1915. British (and later French) forces made the main landing at Cape Helles on the southern tip of Gallipoli, while

Page 4 - Stalemate

By 29 April, the battle of the landing was over; both sides had fought themselves to a standstill. While the New Zealanders and Australians had established a beachhead at Anzac

Page 5 - The Sari Bair offensive

As the futile attacks continued at Helles, the Allies began looking at alternative strategies to break the deadlock. Lieutenant-General Birdwood, the ANZAC commander, formulated a

Page 6 - Evacuation

Hill 60 was the last major Allied attack at Gallipoli. The failure of the August offensive raised more questions about the future of the campaign, especially in light of the

Page 7 - Soldiers' experience

Life for the New Zealand soldier on Gallipoli was tough. They struggled with the harsh environment, living and fighting amongst the deep ravines and high cliffs that towered above

Page 10 - Gallipoli biographies

Find out more about some of the New Zealanders involved in the Gallipoli campaign between April 1915 and January 1916.

First World War - overview

Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and his wife Sophie were assassinated in the Bosnian city of Sarajevo. This was a key event in sparking the Great War of 1914–18. Read the full article

Page 1 - New Zealand and the First World War

Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and his wife Sophie were assassinated in the Bosnian city of Sarajevo. This was a key event in

Page 2 - Origins of the war

As part of the British Empire, New Zealand was formally involved in the First World War (often referred to as the Great War) by the declaration of war on Germany by King George V

Page 3 - Preparing for war

News of the outbreak of war was received in Wellington at 1 p.m. on 5 August 1914. It was announced by the governor, Lord Liverpool, on the steps of Parliament to a crowd of over

Page 4 - New Zealand goes to war

Before the outbreak of war, Prime Minister W.F. Massey had made it clear that New Zealand’s main contribution would be supplying troops to the major theatre of conflict. But

Page 5 - The war at home

New Zealand played a small but useful part in the British Empire's war effort, and its essential war aim was achieved with the defeat of Germany and its allies in late 1918. New

Page 6 - The legacy of war

The war had a major impact on constitutional arrangements within the British Empire, and it affected New Zealand's international status.

Page 7 - First World War timeline

A list of key events marking New Zeland's experience of the First World

Page 8 - Further information

Find more information about the First World

Māori and the First World War

Māori reactions to serving in the First World War largely reflected iwi experiences of British actions in the 19th century. Read the full article

Page 1 - Māori and the First World War

Māori reactions to serving in the First World War largely reflected iwi experiences of British actions in the 19th

Page 2 - White man's war?

Imperial policy initially doubted the wisdom of 'native' troops fighting a 'white man's

Page 3 - Māori objection to conscription

Māori served in the First World War in the Maori Contingent. At home, some Māori strongly opposed

1916: Armentières and the Battle of the Somme

Following the Gallipoli withdrawal, the newly formed New Zealand Division left for France in early April 1916. Sent to the Flanders region to gain front-line experience, they spent the next three months guarding a ‘quiet’ or ‘nursery’ sector of the line at Armentières before moving south to the Somme battlefields and their first large-scale action on the Western Front. Read the full article

Page 1 - The Battle of the Somme

Following the Gallipoli withdrawal, the newly formed New Zealand Division left for France in early April 1916. Sent to the Flanders region to gain front-line experience, they

Conscientious objection and dissent

There are always supporters and opponents of a country fighting a war. Over 2500 conscientious objectors lost their civil rights in New Zealand for refusing to serve in the First World War. Read the full article

Page 1 - Conscientious objection and dissent in the First World War

There are always supporters and opponents of a country fighting a war. Over 2500 conscientious objectors lost their civil rights in New Zealand for refusing to serve in the First

Passchendaele: fighting for Belgium

Ever since 1917 Passchendaele has been a byword for the horror of the First World War. The assault on this tiny Belgian village cost the lives of thousands of New Zealand soldiers. But its impact reached far beyond the battlefield, leaving deep scars on many New Zealand communities and families. Read the full article

Page 1 - Passchendaele: fighting for Belgium

Ever since 1917 Passchendaele has been a byword for the horror of the First World War. The assault on this tiny Belgian village cost the lives of thousands of New Zealand

Page 2 - The battle for Messines

The assault on Passchendaele was part of a vast Allied offensive launched in mid-1917, which, for New Zealanders, started with the Battle for

Page 3 - The Passchendaele offensive

The failed attempt to capture the town of Passchendaele saw more New Zealanders killed in one day than in any other military campaign since

Page 4 - After Passchendaele

Military events in Belgium after the Passchendaele offensive of October 1917, including the failed attack at

Page 5 - The human impact

One in four New Zealand men aged 20–45 was either killed or wounded in the First World War, but the impact of the war reached far beyond these individuals and directly affected

Page 6 - Helping the wounded

More than 14,000 New Zealanders were wounded between June and December 1917 in Belgium, and medical staff, orderlies, chaplains and stretcher-bearers worked round the clock to

Passchendaele activities

Why do the events at Passchendaele in October 1917 go largely unnoticed in the New Zealand calendar? Can a case be made for reconsidering the place of Anzac Day in our national calendar? Read the full article

Page 5 - Their names liveth for ever more activity

Exercise for finding out more about someone who was killed during the

Military mascots

New Zealanders have one of the highest pet-ownership rates in the world. Wartime was no different. Take a tour through this menagerie of military mascots: dogs, cats, donkeys, monkeys, pigs, goats and birds. There's the famous bull terrier Major Major, along with the less well-known, but very cute, slow loris adopted by 1 RNZIR in Borneo. Read the full article

Page 1 - Military mascots

New Zealanders have one of the highest pet-ownership rates in the world. Wartime was no different. Take a tour through this menagerie of military mascots: dogs, cats, donkeys,

Page 2 - First World War mascots

First World War mascots from the New Zealand Rifle Bigade's Great Dane, Freda, to Pelorus Jack of HMS New

Armistice Day

After four terrible years, fighting in the First World War finally ended with the signing of an armistice between Germany and the Allies on 11 November 1918. New Zealanders celebrated enthusiastically, despite having recently celebrated the surrenders of the three other Central Powers and the premature news of an armistice with Germany. Read the full article

Page 1 - Armistice Day

After four terrible years, fighting in the First World War finally ended with the signing of an armistice between Germany and the Allies on 11 November 1918. New Zealanders

Page 2 - Pre-Armistice Day surrenders

From 1 October 1918 New Zealanders progressively celebrated the surrenders of Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire and Austria-Hungary before the armistice with Germany on 11

Page 3 - False armistice

On 7 November 1918 the Prime Minister assured the public - following rumours to the contrary - that the government was not holding back news of a German surrender. The next

Page 4 - Armistice Day celebrations

The news everyone had been waiting for finally arrived on the morning of Tuesday 12 November 1918. Germany had surrendered and signed an armistice with the Allies the previous

Page 5 - Armistice Day and the flu

The influenza pandemic dampened some armistice celebrations, particularly in

Page 6 - New Zealanders overseas

The New Zealand Division official history records that those in France received the news of the armistice ‘generally in a matter of fact way, totally devoid of any demonstration

Page 7 - New Zealand in 1918

Some facts and stats about New Zealand in the year the First World War

Capture of German Samoa

When war broke out in Europe in August 1914, Britain asked New Zealand to seize German Samoa as a ‘great and urgent Imperial service’. Although the tiny German garrison offered no opposition, at the time it was regarded as a potentially risky action. Read the full article

Page 1 - Capture of German Samoa

When war broke out in Europe in August 1914, Britain asked New Zealand to seize German Samoa as a ‘great and urgent Imperial service’. Although the tiny German garrison offered no

Page 3 - Seizing German Samoa

With hindsight, New Zealand's capture of German Samoa on 29 August 1914 was an easy affair. But at the time it was regarded as a potentially risky action with uncertain

The Imperial Camel Corps

The Imperial Camel Corps, which included two New Zealand companies, played a vital role in the Sinai and Palestine campaigns during the First World War. Between 400 and 450 New Zealanders fought in the Corps, and 41 died before the two New Zealand companies were disbanded in mid-1918. Read the full article

Page 1 - Imperial Camel Corps

The Imperial Camel Corps, which included two New Zealand companies, played a vital role in the Sinai and Palestine campaigns during the First World War. Between 400 and 450 New

Page 2 - Formation and expansion

Camels have often fulfilled the role of cavalry on the battlefields of the Middle East and adjacent regions, including during the Sinai and Palestine campaigns of the First World

Page 3 - New Zealand Camel Companies

In August 1916 No 15 (New Zealand) Company, Imperial Camel Corps, was formed from men originally intended as reinforcements for the New Zealand Mounted Rifles

Page 4 - End of the Imperial Camel Corps

The New Zealand camel companies served with the Imperial Camel Corps Brigade in Palestine until it was disbanded in June 1918. At that point the Kiwi cameliers were reorganised as

Page 5 - Cameliers and camels at war

The cameliers of the Imperial Camel Corps would ride their mounts to the scene of the action but once there they were expected to dismount and fight on foot – as

Page 6 - Imperial Camel Corps organisation

Reflecting their ad hoc origins, the camel companies used a unique mixture of infantry and mounted rifles organisation and

Sinai campaign

The Sinai campaign is less well known than other First World War campaigns like Gallipoli and those on the Western Front. But it was here, in the harsh, arid desert, that the Allies took the first major step towards their ultimate victory over the Ottoman Turks in the Middle East. Read the full article

Page 1 - Sinai campaign

The Sinai campaign is less well known than other First World War campaigns like Gallipoli and those on the Western Front. But it was here, in the harsh, arid desert, that the

Page 2 - Overview

The Sinai campaign arose from a change in British thinking about the defence of the Suez

Page 3 - Action at Katia

In March 1916 the commander of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF), General Sir Archibald Murray, ordered his forces to occupy the area around the Katia oasis, 40 km east of

Page 4 - Battle of Romani

Although the action at Katia boosted Ottoman morale, it soon became clear that it had not deterred the British from continuing their offensive into the

Page 5 - Battle of Magdhaba

By mid-December 1916 the Egyptian Expeditionary Force had advanced across the Sinai to within sight of the original objective of the campaign, the town of El

Page 6 - Battle of Rafah

If the British failed to capture Rafah quickly they risked being overwhelmed by large Ottoman forces sent from

Page 7 - Further information

Further reading and links to more information about the Sinai

Temperance movement

Temperance was one of the most divisive social issues in late-19th and early-20th century New Zealand. Social reformers who argued that alcohol fuelled poverty, ill health, crime and immorality nearly achieved national prohibition in a series of hotly contested referendums. Read the full article

Page 4 - Voting for prohibition

The First World War period brought total or partial prohibition to several countries: New Zealand came within a whisker of joining

Palestine campaign

The British invasion of Ottoman-held Palestine in 1917-18 was the third - and last - campaign launched by the Allies against the Ottoman Turks in the Middle East during the First World War. Read the full article

Page 1 - Palestine campaign

The British invasion of Ottoman-held Palestine in 1917-18 was the third - and last - campaign launched by the Allies against the Ottoman Turks in the Middle East during the First

Page 2 - Overview

Victory in Sinai led to pressure from the British government, led by new Prime Minister Lloyd George, to invade Ottoman-controlled Palestine in

Page 3 - First Battle of Gaza

The commander of Eastern Force mistakenly thought that the Egyptian Expeditionary Force could capture Gaza in March 1917 by using essentially the same tactics as those employed at

Page 4 - Second Battle of Gaza

The Second Battle of Gaza three weeks after the First Battle, was an even bigger disaster – a frontal attack by British infantry divisions resulted in their suffering some 6000

Page 5 - Third Battle of Gaza

The third, successful attempt by the British to capture Gaza began in late October

Page 6 - The Trans-Jordan raids

Two raids east of the Jordan River cost 3000 casualties. They are the first real defeats suffered by the EEF since the Second Battle of

Page 7 - Battle of Megiddo

The final battle of the Palestine campaign in September 1918 resulted in arguably the most decisive British victory of the war.

Central Powers

Key statistics and facts about the forces of Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Germany and the Ottoman Empire during the First World War Read the full article

Page 1 - Central Powers

Key statistics and facts about the forces of Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Germany and the Ottoman Empire during the First World

Page 2 - The German Empire

Key information and statistics about the German Empire during the First World

Page 3 - Austro-Hungarian Empire

General facts and statistics about the Austria-Hungarian Empire during the First World

Page 4 - Kingdom of Bulgaria

Key information and statistics about the Kingdom of Bulgaria during the First World

Page 5 - Ottoman Empire

Key information and statistics about the Ottoman Empire during the First World

Allies

The military alliance that fought against the Central Powers was known as the Allies. Initially this alliance was based around the four great powers of Russia, France, Japan and the British Empire, along with the smaller states of Serbia, Montenegro and Belgium that also went to war in 1914. Read the full article

Page 1 - The Allies

The military alliance that fought against the Central Powers was known as the Allies. Initially this alliance was based around the four great powers of Russia, France, Japan and

Page 2 - Kingdom of Belgium

Key information and statistics about the Kingdom of Belgium during the First World

Page 3 - Republic of China

Key information and statistics about the Republic of China during the First World

Page 4 - Republic of France

Key information and statistics about the Republic of France during the First World

Page 5 - Kingdom of Italy

Key information and statistics about the Kingdom of Italy during the First World

Page 6 - Empire of Japan

Key information and statistics about the Empire of Japan during the First World

Page 7 - Kingdom of Montenegro

Key information and statistics about the Kingdom of Montenegro during the First World

Page 8 - Republic of Portugal

Key information and statistics about the Republic of Portugal during the First World

Page 9 - Kingdom of Romania

Key information and statistics about the Kingdom of Romania during the First World

Page 10 - The Russian Empire

Key information and statistics about the Empire of Russia during the First World

Page 11 - Kingdom of Serbia

Key information and statistics about the Kingdom of Serbia during the First World

Page 12 - United States of America

Key information and statistics about the United States of America during the First World

Page 13 - Other states

Key information and statistics about the other states who joined the Allies during the First World

British Empire

Key information and statistics about countries who fought as part of the British Empire during the First World War Read the full article

Page 1 - The British Empire

Key information and statistics about countries who fought as part of the British Empire during the First World

Page 2 - Dominion of New Zealand

Facts and statistics about New Zealand during the First World

Page 3 - Commonwealth of Australia

Key information and statistics about the Commonwealth of Australia during the First World

Page 4 - Dominion of Canada

Key information and statistics about Canada during the First World

Page 5 - British India

Facts and statistics about India during the First World

Page 6 - Dominion of Newfoundland

Key information and statistics about the Dominion of Newfoundland during the First World

Page 7 - Union of South Africa

Facts and stats about South Africa and the First World

Page 8 - United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

Key information and statistics about the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland during the First World

The Ottoman Empire

Few Kiwis today know much about one of our main First World War enemies, the Ottoman Empire - a sophisticated but often forgotten empire whose soldiers fought against New Zealand troops for four years in the Gallipoli, Sinai and Palestine campaigns. Read the full article

Page 4 - Ottoman Empire enters the First World War

Enver Pasha, the Ottoman Minister for War, reacted to the mobilisation of the Russian Army by ordering the Ottoman Army to prepare for war in August 1914.

Page 5 - Ottoman Empire at war

How the Ottoman Empire fared during the First World War

Page 7 - Rise of Arab nationalism

As the Ottoman Empire entered the First World War in 1914 the loyalty of its Arab subjects could no longer be taken for

Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment timeline

Timeline for the Wellington Mounted Rifles in 1915 Read the full article

Page 1 - 1915

Timeline for the Wellington Mounted Rifles in

Page 2 - 1916

Timeline for the Wellington Mounted Rifles in

Page 3 - 1917

What the Wellington Mounted Rifles did in

Page 4 - 1918

The Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment (WMR), along with the rest of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR), moves east across Palestine into the Jordan Valley in early

Page 5 - 1919

Like the rest of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR), the return of the Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment (WMR) to New Zealand in 1919 is delayed by a shortage of

Pacific Islanders in the NZEF

Cook Islanders, Niueans, Fijians and Gilbert Islanders all took their place in the ranks of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force during the First World War. As well as the dangers of war, Pacific soldiers faced language difficulties, an unfamiliar army diet and European diseases. Read the full article

Page 1 - Pacific Islanders in NZEF

Cook Islanders, Niueans, Fijians and Gilbert Islanders all took their place in the ranks of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force during the First World War. As well as the dangers

Page 2 - Niueans and Cook Islanders

Information about Niuean and Cook Island soldiers who were part of the 3rd Maori Contingent in

Page 3 - The Rarotongan Company

Information on the New Zealand Rarotongan Company, which served in the Sinai and Palestine campaigns

Page 4 - Fijian and Gilbert Island Contingents

Information about men from Fiji and the Gilbert Islands who enlisted for service in the NZEF.

Page 5 - Difficulties faced by Pacific Islanders

Information on the difficulties faced by Pacific Islanders when they left their island homes for the first time and entered the

Page 6 - Roll of Honour

List of soldiers from the Cook Islanders and Niue who were killed in the First World

Māori in the NZEF

More than 2000 Maori served in the Māori Contingent and Pioneer Battalion during the First World War Read the full article

Page 1 - Maori Units of the NZEF

More than 2000 Maori served in the Māori Contingent and Pioneer Battalion during the First World

Page 2 - Maori Contingent at Gallipoli

The first Maori Contingent sailed from Wellington aboard the SS Warrimoo in February 1915. The contingent served on the Gallipoli

Page 3 - Pioneer Battalion

In early 1916 the Maori Contingent ceased to exist and was replaced by the New Zealand Pioneer

Page 4 - On the Western Front

The New Zealand Pioneer Battalion arrived in France in April 1916. It was the first unit of the New Zealand Division to move onto the bloody battlefield of the

Page 5 - Further information

Further information about Māori in the First World

1919 peace celebrations

Although the guns fell silent on 11 November 1918, peace wasn't officially proclaimed until 28 June 1919, when the Treaty of Versailles was signed. In July 1919 communities throughout New Zealand and the Empire celebrated peace with elaborate public events over several days. Read the full article

Page 2 - Planning gets under way

Almost immediately after the armistice, communities throughout New Zealand and the Empire began to plan elaborate celebrations that would mark the official end of the war in a

Page 3 - Plans change

Instructions from the British government hindered New Zealand's efforts to plan peace celebrations, but the coal shortage had a much greater impact on the form they eventually

Page 4 - Peace celebration days

Peace celebrations were held throughout New Zealand. Most communities held a Soldiers’ Day, a Day of Thanksgiving, and a Children’s Day on Saturday 19, Sunday 20 and Monday 21

Page 5 - Further information

Suggestions of where to find further information on the peace

Researching New Zealand soldiers

Guidelines for anyone wanting to research New Zealand First World War soldiers. Read the full article

Page 1 - Researching New Zealand soldiers in the First World War

Guidelines for anyone wanting to research New Zealand First World War

Merchant marine

On 3 September New Zealand honours Merchant Navy Day. Here we explore the little-known but vital role played by the merchant marine during the First World War, when these civilian seafarers often found themselves in the front line of the war at sea. Read the full article

Page 1 - The merchant marine in the First World War

On 3 September New Zealand honours Merchant Navy Day. Here we explore the little-known but vital role played by the merchant marine during the First World War, when these civilian

Page 2 - The merchant marine goes to war

The outbreak of war in 1914 posed special problems for New Zealand because of its dependence on sea

Page 3 - The Otaki's epic battle

Many Home boats were lost, especially in 1917-18 when Germany stepped up its submarine warfare against Allied commerce. One action stood out, an epic battle between the New

Page 4 - Hospital ships

In May 1915, as casualties mounted at Gallipoli, the government chartered a hospital ship, the Union Company's 5282-ton trans-Tasman liner

Page 5 - The Wahine's wanderings

Most requisitioned ships continued to carry people or cargo. One Union Company ship, however, entered the Royal Navy and bore the prefix HMS. The Wahine was no ordinary

Page 6 - Agony on the Aparima

One of the worst losses of New Zealand lives at sea occurred on the Union Company’s Aparima in

Page 7 - Home waters

The First World War had a dramatic impact on shipping to and from New

Page 8 - Politics, patriotism and protest

Although New Zealand seafarers served in many hostile theatres, some questioned the politics of the

Page 9 - Merchant marine Roll of Honour

This roll lists the names of over New Zealand-born or – resident seafarers who died during the First World War while serving aboard merchant

Pacific aftermath

Participation in the First World War changed Pacific Islanders' lives. Returning servicemen had seen the world. Read the full article

Page 1 - Aftermath of WW1 in the South Pacific

Participation in the First World War changed Pacific Islanders' lives. Returning servicemen had seen the

Page 3 - Troop repatriation

When the armistice was signed in November 1918, Pacific island troops in New Zealand service were stationed in a number of

Page 5 - Economic, social and political impact

The First World War opened the Pacific Islands to the world more than they ever had been

Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment timeline

The Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment actions in 1915, from Sinai to Gallipoli Read the full article

Page 1 - 1915

The Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment actions in 1915, from Sinai to

Page 2 - 1916

When most of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force goes to France in April 1916, the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) remains in Egypt as part of an Anzac Mounted Division

Page 3 - 1917

During 1917 the Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment (AMR) and the rest of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) take part in three battles for

Page 4 - 1918

The Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment (AMR) and the rest of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) move east across Palestine into the Jordan Valley in early 1918 as part of

Page 5 - 1919

The return home of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) is delayed by a shortage of shipping.

Canterbury Mounted Rifles Regiment timeline

In May the CMR and the rest of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) are thrown – as infantry – into the desperate struggle to seize the commanding heights of the Gallipoli Peninsula. In the next four months the regiment suffers more than half of all its casualties in the war. Read the full article

Page 1 - 1915

In May the CMR and the rest of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) are thrown – as infantry – into the desperate struggle to seize the commanding heights of the

Page 2 - 1916

When most of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force goes to France in April 1916, the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) remains in Egypt as part of an Anzac Mounted

Page 3 - 1917

During 1917 the Canterbury Mounted Rifles Regiment (CMR) and the rest of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) take part in three battles for

Page 4 - 1918

The Canterbury Mounted Rifles Regiment (CMR) and the rest of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) move east across Palestine into the Jordan Valley in early 1918 as part

Page 5 - 1919

The voyage home of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade (NZMR) is delayed by a shortage of shipping. The men take classes designed to ease them back onto ‘civvy street’ after up

Featherston camp

History of the military training camp at Featherston during the First World War Read the full article

Page 1 - Featherston camp

History of the military training camp at Featherston during the First World

Page 2 - Featherston camp death register 1915–19

A transcript of the Featherston Camp death register from the First World

The Royal New Zealand Navy

Seventy years old in October 2011, the Royal New Zealand Navy is today an integral part of the New Zealand Defence Force. But its 1941 establishment was the result of a long process of naval development. Read the full article

Page 1 - The Royal New Zealand Navy

Seventy years old in October 2011, the Royal New Zealand Navy is today an integral part of the New Zealand Defence Force. But its 1941 establishment was the result of a long

Page 3 - First World War

When the Reform government took office in 1912, the way was opened for New Zealand to begin a new approach. The new minister of defence, James Allen, had long wanted New Zealand

First World War art

During the First World War official and unofficial New Zealand war artists produced a wide range of works depicting this country's war effort. These works later became part of New Zealand's National Collection of War Art. Read the full article

Page 1 - First World War art

During the First World War official and unofficial New Zealand war artists produced a wide range of works depicting this country's war effort. These works later became part of New

Page 2 - Unofficial war art

New Zealand soldiers used art to interpret the experience of the war for an audience of noncombatant civilians. Civilian artists in turn produced works that responded to and

Page 3 - Official war art

The NZEF employed its first official war artist, Lance Corporal Nugent Welch, in April 1918. Welch documented the activities of the New Zealand Division in France and Belgium,

Page 4 - Establishing a collection

Following the end of the war, attention turned to where New Zealand's official First World War art collection would be stored. Plans for a National War Memorial Museum in

Page 5 - National Collection of War Art

There are around 1500 paintings, drawings, sketches, cartoons and prints in New Zealand’s National Collection of War Art. This collection has its origins in the final year of the

Page 6 - Kiwi war artists

Selected biographies of New Zealand First World War

Page 7 - Further information

Website links and books relating to New Zealand First World War art

Anzac Day in the Pacific

Armistice Day was the initial focal point for commemorations in the Cook Islands and Niue after the First World War. But because men from both countries had served in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, observances gradually shifted to Anzac Day in April Read the full article

Page 1 - Anzac Day in the Pacific

Armistice Day was the initial focal point for commemorations in the Cook Islands and Niue after the First World War. But because men from both countries had served in the New

Page 2 - Early commemorative efforts

During the 1920s war memorials provided a focus for commemoration services in the Cook Islands, where the first Anzac Day service was possibly held in 1927. On Niue, Armistice

Page 3 - The growth of Anzac Day

By the end of the Second World War military commemorations in the Cook Islands and Niue centered around Anzac Day. Services in both countries followed the pattern of those in New

Page 4 - Present day commemorations

In the new millennium there has been increasing interest in the story of Pacific Island involvement in the First World War. In the Cook Islands there have been efforts to rebuild

Page 5 - Further information

Books and further reading relating to the history of Anzac Day in the Pacific Islands of Niue and the Cook

Schools and the First World War

Schools and children were quickly called into action at the outset of the First World War in 1914. Developing patriotic, fit and healthy citizens was seen as important to the survival of the country and the Empire. Hundreds of teachers joined the NZEF, including many from sole-teacher schools. Almost 200 never returned. Read the full article

Page 1 - Children, schools and the First World War

Schools and children were quickly called into action at the outset of the First World War in 1914. Developing patriotic, fit and healthy citizens was seen as important to the

Page 2 - Schools in 1914

The head of the Department of Education believed that ‘moral purpose should dominate the spirit of the whole school life.’ Schools and teachers were to shape children into

Page 3 - Displaying patriotism

In late 1917 district education boards ordered that children salute the New Zealand flag at the start of each school day. Some teachers opposed this as too

Page 4 - The School Journal

During the First World War the New Zealand School Journal played an important role in encouraging patriotism, self-sacrifice, obedience and support for the war effort among

Page 5 - Turning boys into soldiers

The Defence Amendment Act 1900 introduced military cadet training into schools. The Defence Act 1909 made military training for nearly all boys compulsory from the age of 12.

Page 6 - Supporting the war effort

During the war children were encouraged to be ‘cheerful’ and ‘helpful’, to ease the worry and sorrow of the mothers and wives of soldiers. There were also many practical ways in

Page 7 - Teachers who served

Whether as school cadet officers or supporters of saluting the flag, teachers did much to set the moral tone of New Zealand schools before and during the war. Many hundreds were

Page 8 - Further information

Links and books relating to schooling during the First World

The Salonika campaign

23 October is the anniversary of the 1915 sinking of the Marquette with the loss of 32 New Zealanders, including 10 nurses. They were en route from Egypt to the Greek port of Salonika as New Zealand’s contribution to the little-known Allied campaign in the Balkans Read the full article

Page 1 - The Salonika campaign

23 October is the anniversary of the 1915 sinking of the Marquette with the loss of 32 New Zealanders, including 10 nurses. They were en route from Egypt to the Greek port of

Page 2 - Lemnos

The Balkan campaign of the First World War (also known as the Salonika or the Macedonian campaign) came about because of the changing strategic aims of the Allies and Central

Page 3 - Serbia 1915

As New Zealand forces rested on the island of Lemnos in the autumn of 1915, the crisis in the Balkans intensified.

Page 4 - Campaign summary

The failure of the Anglo-French advance into Serbia in November 1915 forced the Allied forces to dig in on the outskirts of Salonika in case the Bulgarians attacked Greece.

Page 6 - Hidden Anzacs

A number of New Zealanders served in the British imperial forces at Salonika rather than with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

NZ's First World War horses

Between 1914 and 1916 the New Zealand government acquired more than 10,000 horses to equip the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. They served in German Samoa, Gallipoli, the Middle East and on the Western Front. Of those that survived the war, only four returned home. Read the full article

Page 1 - New Zealand's First World War horses

Between 1914 and 1916 the New Zealand government acquired more than 10,000 horses to equip the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. They served in German Samoa, Gallipoli, the Middle

Page 2 - Acquiring horses for war

Between 1914 and 1916 the New Zealand government acquired more than 10,000 horses to equip the New Zealand Expeditionary

Page 3 - Transporting horses from NZ

Nearly all of the 10,000 horses the government acquired for the New Zealand Expeditionary Force between 1914 and 1916 went overseas.

Page 4 - German Samoa

A total of 141 New Zealand horses were transported to Samoa during the First World War. Of these, 25 were despatched with the Samoa Advance Party of the New Zealand Expeditionary

Page 6 - Sinai and Palestine

Several thousand of the New Zealand forces’ horses remained in the Middle East when the New Zealand Division sailed to France. These horses served with the New Zealand Mounted

Page 7 - Western Front

More than 3000 horses and mules went from Egypt to France with the New Zealand Division in April 1916. Most of these horses had probably come from New Zealand

Page 8 - The end of the war

Of the 10,000 horses the government acquired between 1914 and 1916 very few died in New Zealand, or whilst being transported. Many died from disease or injury once overseas. Of

Page 9 - Further information

Recommended books and links to information about New Zealand horses in the First World

First World War bibliography

Sources for further reading about New Zealand's First World War experience. Read the full article

Page 1 - First World War bibliography

Sources for further reading about New Zealand's First World War

The War in the air

More than 800 New Zealanders served as air or ground crew in the war between 1914 and 1918, the vast majority of them in Europe. A handful saw action in Gallipoli and the Middle East. Read the full article

Page 1 - The War in the Air

More than 800 New Zealanders served as air or ground crew in the war between 1914 and 1918, the vast majority of them in Europe. A handful saw action in Gallipoli and the Middle

Page 2 - Early military aviation

Military aviation began with balloons. Powered aircraft were first used for military purposes just before the outbreak of the First World

Page 3 - First World War developments

The remarkable story of how over four years a new and primitive weapon developed into a key element of

Page 4 - New Zealand's air war 1914-1918

With no military flying corps in New Zealand, hundreds of adventurous young Kiwis joined British and Australian air services during the First World

Page 5 - Kiwi stories

Find out more about some of New Zealand's First World War

Page 6 - Further information

Books and links relating to the War in the Air during the First World

Hospital ships

The Maheno and Marama were the poster ships of New Zealand's First World War effort. Until 1915 these steamers had carried passengers on the Tasman route. But as casualties mounted at Gallipoli, the government - helped by a massive public fundraising campaign - converted them into state-of-the-art floating hospitals. Read the full article

Page 1 - Hospital ships

The Maheno and Marama were the poster ships of New Zealand's First World War effort. Until 1915 these steamers had carried passengers on the Tasman route. But as casualties

Page 3 - Gallipoli calls

The terrible casualty rate of the Gallipoli campaign spurred Governor Liverpool to raise funds for New Zealand hospital

Page 4 - Civilians at Gallipoli

The Maheno arrived in the Mediterranean in time for the Allies’ bloody late August 1915 offensives to find that not much had improved since the April

Page 5 - Life on board

What was life like aboard a hospital ship? That largely depended on your job, your rank and your

Page 6 - Later service and legacies

The Marama missed Gallipoli, reaching the Mediterranean a few weeks after the Allies abandoned the peninsula. The ships’ service pattern would now be dominated by long voyages

Page 7 - Hospital ships' movements 1915-19

Movements of the hospital ships Maheno and Marama during the First World

1918: Spring Offensive and Advance to Victory

In 1918, a series of major German and Allied offensives broke the stalemate of trench warfare on the Western Front, resulting in the collapse of the German Army and the end of the war within the year. New Zealand units played an important part in the Allies' final push for victory. Read the full article

Page 1 - 1918: spring offensive and advance to victory

In 1918, a series of major German and Allied offensives broke the stalemate of trench warfare on the Western Front, resulting in the collapse of the German Army and the end of the

HMS Philomel

New Zealand's first warship, HMS Philomel formed the core of the country's naval forces during the First World War. The aged and largely obsolete vessel was commissioned in New Zealand in July 1914, and went on to serve in the Pacific, Mediterranean and Middle East. Read the full article

Page 1 - NZ's first warship

New Zealand's first warship, HMS Philomel formed the core of the country's naval forces during the First World War. The aged and largely obsolete vessel was commissioned in New

The Post and Telegraph Department at war

The Post and Telegraph Department (the government agency from which New Zealand Post, Telecom and Kiwibank are descended) was crucial to this country’s participation in the First World War. Read the full article

Page 1 - The Post and Telegraph Department at war

The Post and Telegraph Department (the government agency from which New Zealand Post, Telecom and Kiwibank are descended) was crucial to this country’s participation in the First

Page 2 - Post and Telegraph timeline

Key events in the Post and Telegraph Department before, during and after the First World

Page 6 - Communications on the Western Front

In April 1916, the recently formed New Zealand Division was transported by troopship across the Mediterranean from the Egyptian port of Alexandria to Marseille in the south of

First World War farewells

Between 1914 and 1918, New Zealanders farewelled more than 100,000 men as they headed off to a military training camp or went straight to war. Read the full article

Page 1 - First World War farewells

Between 1914 and 1918, New Zealanders farewelled more than 100,000 men as they headed off to a military training camp or went straight to war.

Supporting the war effort

Thousands of New Zealanders donated money, goods or time to help those affected by the First World War. Read the full article

Page 1 - Supporting the war effort, 1914-1919

Thousands of New Zealanders donated money, goods or time to help those affected by the First World War.

Page 2 - Overview: 1914-1919

The sacrifices of the men at the front, and the plight of those living in the war zones, drove many New Zealanders to donate money, goods and time to help the war effort. By 1920,

Page 3 - Who were the volunteers?

The outbreak of war saw New Zealanders from all walks of life donate money, goods and time to fund-raising

Page 4 - What were the causes?

Page 5 - Supporting Belgium: Queen Elisabeth Medal

The Belgian government created the Medaille de la Reine Elisabeth, or Queen Elisabeth Medal, to honour Belgian and foreign women who had performed outstanding services in aid of

First World War by the numbers

This article provides a clearly written and carefully argued statistical survey of New Zealand’s military contribution to the First World War. Read the full article

Page 1 - First World War by the numbers

This article provides a clearly written and carefully argued statistical survey of New Zealand’s military contribution to the First World

The Public Service at war - overview

The New Zealand public service played a central part in New Zealand’s war effort, both at home and abroad Read the full article

Page 1 - The Public Service at war - overview

The New Zealand public service played a central part in New Zealand’s war effort, both at home and

NZ Railways at war

The railway system and its workforce was one of the most valuable assets available to the New Zealand state to support the national effort during the First World War Read the full article

Page 1 - NZ Railways at war

The railway system and its workforce was one of the most valuable assets available to the New Zealand state to support the national effort during the First World

Page 2 - Railways in the First World War

The steam railway was a driving force of the industrial revolution and European imperialist

Page 4 - Railwaymen in the NZEF

More than 5000 permanent NZR employees served overseas during the war, about 40% of the 1914

Page 7 - Further information

New Zealand Army Nursing Service

The 550 or so New Zealand nurses who served overseas during the First World War enlisted for the same reasons as the soldiers – duty, patriotism and adventure. Read the full article

Page 1 - New Zealand Army Nursing Service in the First World War

The 550 or so New Zealand nurses who served overseas during the First World War enlisted for the same reasons as the soldiers – duty, patriotism and

Rolls of honour and obituaries

Government rolls of honour and obituaries published at the end of the First World War. Read the full article

Page 1 - Government department rolls of honour and obituaries

Government rolls of honour and obituaries published at the end of the First World

Page 2 - Public Service Roll of Honour

This Roll of Honour lists 218 men from the core Public Service who died in the First World War. It was originally published in the New Zealand Gazette on 29 April

Page 3 - Post and Telegraph Roll of Honour

This Roll of Honour lists 234 men from the Post and Telegraph Department who died in the First World War.

Page 4 - Railways Department Roll of Honour

This Roll of Honour lists 450 men from the Railways Department who died in the First World

Page 5 - Public Service Journal obituaries 1915-18

Obituaries of soldiers killed in the First World War that were published in the Public Service Journal from

Page 6 - Railway workers' obituaries

Obituaries were published during the First World War in the New Zealand Railway

Page 7 - Post and Telegraph obituaries

Page 8 - Education service Roll of Honour

Roll of honour for education service employees killed in the First World

Infantry units

The function and form of the New Zealand infantry units during the First World War Read the full article

Page 2 - Auckland Infantry Regiment

Information about the structure, badges and campaigns of the Auckland Infantry Regiment during the First World

Page 3 - Canterbury Infantry Regiment

Information about the structure, badges and campaigns of the Canterbury Infantry Regiment during the First World

Page 4 - Otago Infantry Regiment

The organisation and insignia of the Otago Infantry Regiment during the First World

Page 5 - Wellington Infantry Regiment

Information about the structure, badges and campaigns of the Wellington Infantry Regiment during the First World

Page 6 - New Zealand Rifle Brigade

The New Zealand Rifle Brigade was created in April 1915 as a second New Zealand infantry brigade, to complement the brigade then serving at

Mounted Rifles units

An overview of the formation and units of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles in the First World war Read the full article

Page 1 - New Zealand Mounted Rifles

An overview of the formation and units of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles in the First World

Page 2 - Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment

The Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment (AMR) was one of four mounted rifles regiments raised to serve overseas in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) during the First World

Page 3 - Canterbury Mounted Rifles Regiment

After training in Egypt the CMR fought in the Gallipoli campaign from May to December 1915. On its return from Gallipoli the regiment spent another four months in Egypt before

Page 5 - Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment

The Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment (WMR) was one of four mounted rifles regiments raised to serve overseas in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) during the First World

Page 6 - Auckland Mounted Rifles timeline 1914-19

Detailed account of the AMR in

Page 7 - Canterbury Mounted Rifles timeline 1914-19

Formation and first actions of the Canterbury Mounted Rifles

Page 8 - Wellington Mounted Rifles timeline 1914-19

Timeline for the Wellington Mounted Rifles in

New Zealand Field Artillery

Overview of the roll of the New Zealand artillery in the First World War Read the full article

Page 1 - Artillery units

Overview of the roll of the New Zealand artillery in the First World

Page 2 - New Zealand Field Artillery Brigades

Page 3 - Ammunition Column

The work and unit history of the Ammunition columns during the First World

Page 4 - Trench Mortar Batteries

A unit history of the NZEF Trench mortar batteries in the First World

First World War military formations

This article provides an overview of how the New Zealand forces were organised during the First World War. Read the full article

Page 1 - First World War military formations

This article provides an overview of how the New Zealand forces were organised during the First World

Specialist Units of the NZEF

Overview of the role of Specialist Units in the First World War Read the full article

Page 1 - Specialist Units of the NZEF

Overview of the role of Specialist Units in the First World

Page 2 - Engineers

The role, organisation and heraldry of the New Zealand Engineers in the First World

Page 5 - Machine Gunners

The role and organisation of the New Zealand Machine Gunners unit in the First World

Page 7 - Signallers

The role and organisation of the New Zealand Signallers unit in the First World

Page 8 - Railway companies

The role and organisation of the New Zealand Railway Company and Light Railway Operating Company during the First World

Page 9 - Entrenching Battalions

The New Zealand entrenching battalions dug trenches and other earthworks to assist units such as tunnellers, pioneers, railways, engineers and

Page 10 - Imperial Camel Corps

Formation information relating the New Zealand Camel companies during the First World

Page 11 - Further information

Recommended reading for information about New Zealand Specialist units in the First World

Medical Units

The New Zealand Expeditionary Force was supported by a broad network of medical services in the First World War Read the full article

Page 1 - Medical Units of the NZEF

The New Zealand Expeditionary Force was supported by a broad network of medical services in the First World

Page 2 - New Zealand Medical Corps

Page 3 - New Zealand Army Nursing Service

The New Zealand Army Nursing Service was created in January 1915 to provide nurses for NZEF

Page 4 - Dental Corps

The New Zealand Dental Corps provided dental treatment to military personnel in New Zealand, and in the theatres of war from late

Page 5 - Veterinary Corps

Overview of the work and formations of the New Zealand Veterinary Corps during the First World

Supply and Administrative Units

Administrative units helped to ensure that soldiers were fed, clothed, and supplied with all the necessaries of warfare Read the full article

Page 1 - Supply and Administrative Units

Administrative units helped to ensure that soldiers were fed, clothed, and supplied with all the necessaries of

Page 2 - Army Service Corps

The Army Service Corps was the NZEF’s supply and transport branch, providing food, equipment and ammunition, and helping evacuate the

Page 3 - Employment Companies

New Zealand’s two employment companies, created in 1917, carried out labouring work behind the lines on the Western

Page 4 - Chaplains

Chaplains provided spiritual support to the troops, performing church services, officiating at burials, comforting the ill and dying, and organising entertainment for the

Page 5 - Army Ordnance Corps

The Army Ordnance Corps maintained and issued all types of stores except food and fuel at defence stores and depots during the First World

Page 6 - Army Pay Corps

The Army Pay Corps (sometimes Army Pay Department) issued pay to the men of the

Page 7 - Army Postal Service

Māori and Pacific units

Māori and Pacific troops served mainly as non-combatants at Gallipoli, the Western Front and in Sinai-Palestine during the First World War. Read the full article

Page 1 - Māori and Pacific units

Māori and Pacific troops served mainly as non-combatants at Gallipoli, the Western Front and in Sinai-Palestine during the First World

Page 2 - Māori units

Formation and organisation of the Maori Contingent and Pioneer Battalion during the First World

Page 3 - Rarotongan Company

Rarotongan and Niuean recruits were included in the NZEF’s Māori units durng the First World

1917: Arras, Messines and Passchendaele

During 1917, Allied hopes of a decisive breakthrough on the Western Front were repeatedly raised, then dashed. Read the full article

Page 1 - 1917: Arras, Messines and Passchendaele

During 1917, Allied hopes of a decisive breakthrough on the Western Front were repeatedly raised, then

Life in the trenches

The daily tasks of life went on despite the hellish conditions of the Western Front trenches. Read the full article

Page 1 - Life in the trenches

The daily tasks of life went on despite the hellish conditions of the Western Front

First World War glossary and list of abbreviations

This list provides basic definitions of common First World War terms and abbreviations found in military personnel files Read the full article

Page 1 - First World War glossary and list of abbreviations

This list provides basic definitions of common First World War terms and abbreviations found in military personnel

Related keywords

Main image: George Bollinger
George Bollinger's diary documents superbly the experiences and shifting attitudes of a New Zealand soldier during the Gallipoli campaign.

Images and media for WW1