religion

Events In History

Articles

Pai Marire

  • Pai Marire

    Pai Marire (goodness and peace) was one of several Maori Christian faiths to emerge in the 19th century. Like many others, it was closely tied to issues of land and politics.

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  • Page 2 – Te Ua Haumēne

    Pai Marire disciples travelled around the North Island in the mid-1860s. Against a backdrop of war and land confiscations, the founding principle of Pai Marire was often

Premiers and Prime Ministers

  • Premiers and Prime Ministers

    From Henry Sewell in 1856 to Jacinda Ardern in 2017, New Zealand has had 40 prime ministers and premiers. Read biographies of the men and women who have held the top job, discover more about the role's political origins, and explore fascinating prime ministerial facts and trivia.

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  • Page 1 - Premiers and Prime MinistersFrom Henry Sewell in 1856 to Jacinda Ardern in 2017, New Zealand has had 40 prime ministers and premiers. Read biographies of the men and women who have held the top job, discover

Māori King movement - 1860-94

  • Māori King movement - 1860-94

    King Tāwhiao's reign was dominated by the Waikato War and its fallout.

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  • Page 4 - RaupatuUnder the terms of the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863 the government confiscated 1.2 million acres (486,000 hectares) of Māori land in late

Anzac Day

  • Anzac Day

    First observed in 1916, Anzac Day - 25 April - commemorates those killed in war as well as honouring returned servicemen and women. The ceremonies that are held at war memorials across the country, or in places overseas where New Zealanders gather, are rich in tradition and ritual.

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  • Page 6 – Another war and peace

    Anzac Day came to have a wider focus and the commemorations became more popular in the years after the Second World War.

Armistice Day

  • Armistice Day

    After four terrible years, the First World War finally came to a close with the signing of an armistice between Germany and the Allied Powers on 11 November 1918. New Zealanders celebrated enthusiastically, despite having recently celebrated the surrenders of the three other Central Powers and the premature news of an armistice with Germany.

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  • Page 7 - New Zealand in 1918Some facts and stats about New Zealand in the year of the First World War

Biographies

  • Te Whiti-o-Rongomai III, Erueti

    Te Whiti was a Taranaki leader and prophet. A resistance movement based at Parihaka was led by him and Tohu Kākahi. Te Whiti was arrested following the infamous raid on Parihaka by Armed Constabulary in 1881.

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  • Rātana, Tahupōtiki Wiremu

    Tahupōtiki Wiremu Rātana, of Ngāti Apa and Ngā Rauru, founded the Rātana Church, which remains a major religious and political force today.

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  • Hadfield, Octavius

    Octavius Hadfield, member of the Church Missionary Society, was, in 1838, the first priest to be ordained in New Zealand. He became Bishop of Wellington in 1870.

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  • Te Ua Haumēne

    In 1862 Te Ua Haumēne established a new religion, Hauhau based on the principle of pai marire – goodness and peace. Most settlers viewed Hauhau as a anti-European religion that became synonymous with ‘violence, fanaticism and barbarism’.

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  • Jamieson, Penelope Ann Bansall

    English-born New Zealander Penny Jamieson was the first woman in the world to be ordained a diocesan bishop of the Anglican Church

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  • Cargill, William Walter

    Often seen out in his blue bonnet and tartan plaid in early colonial Dunedin, Captain William Cargill was the first leader of the Free Church of Scotland’s settlement in Dunedin.

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  • Aubert, Mary Joseph

    Suzanne Aubert – later Mary Joseph Aubert – was a Catholic nun, nurse, teacher and pioneering social worker, who sometimes had to battle church and government authorities in order to help those in need.

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  • Williams, William

    An early missionary and linguist, William Williams later came to criticise the government's dealings during the New Zealand Wars.

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